The Arkive
 
|| Year Gamma: London: Thursday: July 19: 2018 ||
First Published: September 24: 2015
The Humanion

 

 

The Humanion UK Online Daily

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Asia

Asia Arkive

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

University of Kathmandu Medical School Nepal

Asia is made of countries: Abkhazia, Afghanistan, Akrotiri and Dhekelia, Armenia:Europe: Azerbaijan:Europe: Bahrain, Bangladesh, Bhutan, British Indian Ocean Territory, Brunei, Cambodia, China, Christmas Island, Cocos Islands, Cyprus:Europe: East Timor, Georgia:Europe: Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Israel, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Laos, Lebanon, Macau, Malaysia, Maldives, Mongolia, Myanmar:Burma: Nagorno-Karabakh, Nepal, North Korea, Northern Cyprus, Oman, Pakistan, Palestine, Philippines, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Singapore, South Korea, South Ossetia, Sri Lanka, Syria, Taiwan, Tajikistan, Thailand, Turkey:Europe: Turkmenistan, United Arab Emirates, Uzbekistan, Vietnam and Yemen

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hong Kong: Proposed Ban on Pro-Independence Political Party is a Dangerous Blow for Freedoms of Association and Expression: Amnesty International

 

 

 

|| July 18: 2018 || ά. Responding to news that the Hong Kong authorities have initiated a procedure to ban the Hong Kong National Party, which advocates for Hong Kong independence from China, Mr Patrick Poon, China Researcher at Amnesty International, said, “This is a chilling day for freedom of association and freedom of expression in Hong Kong, with potentially far-reaching consequences. To use sweeping references to ‘national security’ to silence dissenting voices is a tactic favoured by repressive governments.

The authorities must stop using vague laws to intimidate people who hold different political views. The attempt to ban the Hong Kong National Party raises alarm bells as to what the government will look to curtail next in the name of national security. Under international law and standards, any prohibition of an organization is subject to a strict test of justification, with the burden of proof on the government to demonstrate that a real, not just hypothetical, danger to national security exists.”

The Hong Kong authorities have written to notify the Hong Kong National Party, a local organisation advocating for Hong Kong independence, of its plan to ban it. Among the reasons for the proposed ban are speeches made and rallies attended by the party’s Leader, Mr Andy Chan Ho-tin, in Hong Kong and Taiwan.

The proposed ban is based on the Societies Ordinance, which stipulates that the government can prohibit the operation of any organisation ‘for the interests of national security or public safety, public order or the protection of the rights and freedom of others’ or, if, the organisation is a political body, that has a connection with a foreign political organisation or a political organisation of Taiwan.

Any operations, member recruitment and fundraising activities of a banned organisation could result in up to three years’ imprisonment.

The Societies Ordinance has been criticised by human rights groups for the potential impact on freedom of expression and association. In 1999, a United Nations human rights body called on the Hong Kong government to review the Societies Ordinance, noting that it could be applied in a way to unduly restrict the right to freedom of association. :::ω.

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The World Health Organisation Expresses Concern About Access to Health Services for the Displaced People in Southern Syria

 

 

|| July 12: 2018 || ά. The World Health Organisation:WHO today called for the protection of health facilities and increased access to southern Syria, where the recent hostilities have left over 210,000 people displaced and in need of urgent health services. Up to 160,000 displaced Syrians, currently seeking safety in Quneitra, are inaccessible to health partners, raising concerns for their health. “People in Dar’a and Quneitra are waiting for the humanitarian community to reach them with urgently needed aid and we can not let them down. Access must be granted.” said Dr Michel Thieren, WHO’s Regional Emergencies Director.

“We call on all parties to open the door to people in southern Syria and allow the safe delivery of medicines and medical items they need and to grant severely injured patients safe passage to hospitals outside the area that can save their lives.” The majority of people displaced are exposed to soaring summer temperatures of up to 45 degrees Celsius and dusty desert winds, with limited access to clean drinking-water, sanitation services and adequate health care. In the past week, at least 15 Syrians, 12 children, two women and one elderly man, have died due to dehydration and diseases transmitted through contaminated water.

Almost, 75% of all public hospitals and health centres in  Dar’a and Quneitra are closed or only partially functioning, leaving injured people, including, hundreds of innocent children and pregnant women, in need of emergency obstetric services, with limited access to medical care.

The WHO-supported blood bank was relocated after the health facility in which it was located was destroyed and continues to function with minimum capacity.

Since the escalation of violence, WHO has provided medicines and supplies to health partners, hospitals and primary health care centres for, almost, 200,000 medical treatments, including, to facilities receiving critically injured patients.

WHO is, also supporting health service delivery in Dar’a, Jbab and other newly accessible areas through fixed and mobile health teams, which have provided more than 4,500 consultations to date and screened more than 660 children for malnutrition. Vaccination activities are ongoing with the health authorities and partners. :::ω.

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Birmingham and Haryana Sign Agreement on Clean Cold for India




|| May 22: 2018: University of Birmingham News || ά. The University of Birmingham and the State Government of Haryana have signed an agreement to advance the use of ‘clean cold’ technology in India and help meet rising demand for cooling sustainably. The agreement will see a collaboration to develop centres of excellence for clean cold chains, that will help to map out a blueprint and delivery plan for sustainable cooling across the north Indian state. A Memorandum of Understanding was signed in a special ceremony in London by Mr T L Satya Prakash, Managing Director of Haryana State Industrial and Infrastructure Development Corporation Limited on behalf of the State Government of Haryana and Professor Andy Schofield, Head of the College of Engineering and Physical Sciences at the University of Birmingham.

The meeting and signing ceremony was attended by the Haryana Chief Minister, Mr Haryana Manohar Lal Khattar. The signing follows the world’s first-ever Congress on Clean Cold held at the University of Birmingham last month and supported by the University’s India Institute. The India Institute, also, sponsored the first Birmingham-Haryana clean cold workshop last year. April’s ‘Cool World’ congress brought together cooling and energy efficiency decision-makers and experts from India and around the globe to discuss the urgent topic of how to meet our global demand for cooling sustainably. Professor Andy Schofield said, “The University of Birmingham is a global leader in clean cooling and we are committed to making a significant contribution to Indian society, particularly, through the work of our India Institute in bringing the UK and India closer together.

We are looking forward to working closely with the State Government of Haryana in tackling the formidable challenges posed by sustainable cooling. It’s hard to overstate the importance of cold chain in delivering Prime Minister Modi’s target of doubling farmers’ income by 2022. A seamless ‘cold chain’ is needed to move food swiftly from farm to consumer.

This will reduce food loss to raise farmers’ income and give them bigger markets, whilst expanding their selling range. But at the same time, it, must be, clean and sustainable cooling. Climate change and toxic air pollution must be tackled by reducing use of conventional, highly polluting cooling technologies and adopting zero-emission technologies.”

The agreement builds on the University’s work with collaborators in India to understand how to deliver sustainable refrigerated distribution chains to help boost farmers’ income. Researchers will work with Indian partners and State Governments, including, Haryana, to develop a Centre of Excellence that demonstrates innovative and integrated solutions for creating cooling solutions for farmers without compromising climate goals. This work combines engineering and social sciences, for an integrated approach, that includes the behaviour of individuals; technical solutions and the business models to make those solutions viable.

A workshop hosted by the State Government of Haryana working with India’s National Centre for Cold-chain Development to engage logistics and supply chain operators, management and financial consultants, as well as, major cooling and refrigeration companies is planned for this Summer.

Professor Toby Peters of the University of Birmingham said, “Effective refrigeration is essential to preserve food and medicine. It underpins industry and economic growth, is key to sustainable urbanisation and provides a ladder out of rural poverty. It makes much of the world bearable or, even, safe to live in.

The growth of artificial cooling is, already, having a major environmental impact. Given the speed of growth, we need to work together to provide sustainable affordable cooling services to all. Not just technologies but, also, new business models, policy, skills, capacity building and training which will be required. This agreement represents an opportunity to work with the State Government of Haryana and lead the way in creating a regional clean cold chain blueprint, that will help to shape the future of sustainable cooling in India and beyond.”

Professor Robin Mason, University of Birmingham Pro-Vice-Chancellor, International Affairs said, “The University of Birmingham is a civic university with a global outlook but there exists a special bond between Birmingham and India which stretches back to the arrival of our first Indian student in 1909.

Our India Institute affirms the University of Birmingham’s deep and continued commitment to engagement with the country. This agreement with Haryana is a great example of how we can contribute to Indian society, as our researchers forge links with their counterparts that will change millions of lives for the better.”

Caption: Professor Andy Schofield, University of Birmingham and Mr T L Satya Prakash, Mr T L Satya Prakash, Haryana State Industrial and Infrastructure Development Corporation Limited, sign the Memorandum of Understanding: Image: Nicola Gotts::: ω.

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Investing in the Health of Syrians is an Investment in the Future of Syria: WHO



|| April 24: 2018 || ά. As the international community comes together in Brussels to show support for Syrians and for a political solution to the conflict, the World Health Organisation:WHO calls for increased investments in health to protect the lives of almost 17 million vulnerable children, women and men inside Syria and in five major neighbouring countries. Every day, Syrians are dying of conditions, that are easily treatable. Inside the country, critical shortages, insecurity and disrupted systems have left millions of people in need of health aid.

Meanwhile, Syrians, who have fled to neighbouring countries find themselves just as vulnerable, with the vast majority living below the poverty line and unable to afford life-saving health care. Seven years into the crisis the conflict has left 11.3 million people inside Syria in need of life-saving and life-sustaining humanitarian health aid, while fewer than half of all public health facilities are fully operational. Indiscriminate attacks on health care continue; in 2018 alone, there have been eight health workers killed or injured and 74 verified attacks on health facilities. 

Throughout the country, people are unable to obtain basic, life-saving health care services without being exposed to significant risks on a daily basis. These include, almost, 02.3 million people in hard-to-reach and besieged areas. Hundreds of seriously ill and wounded people living in besieged areas have been denied the right to leave to obtain life-saving health care. Many of them have died as a result.

Newly accessible areas are, often, contaminated with explosive hazards and those, who chose to return to their homes, may be, more at risk of injuries, exacerbated by the lack of basic health care services in many areas of return. For, almost, six million Syrian refugees across the Region, the living situation continues to be extremely challenging. Many refugees face psychosocial and physical effects of war and displacement and are in need for primary, secondary and tertiary health care.

National health systems across the Region continue to be the primary responders to those health needs, however, access continues to be limited, not only due to overwhelmed and under-funded health systems, but also due to the financial limitations of the refugees themselves.

In addition to millions of Syrian refugees affected by the crisis, an additional four million host community members are, also, affected by the refugee crisis, and in need of aid. In Turkey, where integration of Syrian health care workers into national health systems is well established, language and cultural barriers remain a challenge.

Within the context of the Brussels conference on Syria and the Region WHO emphasises that health is a human right, that, must be, respected by all parties to the conflict, that the attacks on health workers and facilities must stop and that there must be adequate investment in the health sector of both Syria and neighbouring host countries. The people of Syria can not have a future without proper health care.

As part of the Humanitarian Response Plan for Syria 2018, WHO and health partners require US$426.4 million to reach 11.3 million people across the country with life-saving health care services. Of this amount, WHO requires US$143 million. To address the health needs of more than 05.3 million Syrian refugees and almost four million host community members affected by the Syrian refugee crisis, the health and nutrition sector requires US$294 million as part of the Regional Refugee and Resilience Plan for 2018-2019. ::: ω.

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Regine Humanics Foundation Begins Its Journey Today: The Humanion Is Now A Regine Humanics Foundation Publication

 



|| April 06: 2018 || ά. The Humanion was first published on September 24, 2015 and has been run, since that day, on a complete voluntary basis without any 'formal' or 'constituted' manner or form and, it was run on as a Human Enterprise, which is an idea of Humanics, in which, ownership is replaced by belongingship and, thus, in a Humanical Society, no one owns anything but everyone belongs to the whole as the whole belongs to everyone lawfully and equally and, it neither believes in nor makes money but human utilities, needs, aspirations, creativity, imagination and dreams are served without money, where everyone works and creates for all others as all others create and work for all others, thus, bringing in meaning and purpose to life along with it come natural justice, equality and liberty, that establish a true civilisation within the Rule of Law. And in one word, this system of human affairs management is called, Humanics and a society that runs itself in humanics is called a humanical society. Today, we have begun the process of 'constituting' this Human Enterprise, which does not exist in the current system, but the next closest thing to it, that exists in the UK Law is Social Enterprise. Therefore, today, Friday, April 06, 2018, we are beginning Regine Humanics Foundation, that is the 'Agency', that will lead, run, manage and develop everything, that The Humanion has been trying to do.

Regine Humanics Foundation is established by the Thinker, Author, Poet, Novelist, Playwright, Editor of The Humanion, Festival Director of London Poetry Festival and a Humanicsxian: hu: maa: neek: tian: One, that believes in, lives and exists by Humanics, Mr Munayem Mayenin, of London, England, United Kingdom. Mr Mayenin says, ''Humanics is a vision; people, may, call it, utopia, we, call it our Humanicsovicsopia; Humanics. Humanics is our philosophy, our faith, our conviction, our resolution, our way of existing, thinking, being and doing: to seek and try to do so in the determination that all we must do and be is to exist to advance the human condition. People, readers and agencies and organisations, from all across England, Scotland, Northern Ireland, Wales and the whole of the United Kingdom and Australasia, Africa, Asia, Europe, North and South America, from all walks and strata of life, have supported our endeavours, supported The Humanion and The Humanion Team, who volunteered their time to run things, since the beginning of The Humanion and long before that, when other things, that are now part of The Foundation, were developing. Nothing has changed in terms of the nature and value of what we have been seeking to do.''

''But the founding of The Foundation brings it all in a solid foundation so that we can keep on building this 'vision' so that it keeps on going regardless of who come to take the vision-mission of The Foundation forward. The Foundation runs along with time and along with the flowing humanity. This is the dream, this is the vision, this the hope in founding this Foundation. And, in this, we hope and invite all our readers, supporters, well wishers and all agencies and organisations to support our endeavours to build something, a Human Enterprise, which we are in the process of registering as a Social Enterprise, as a Community Interest Company, working for the common good of the one and common humanity. No one makes or takes profit out of The Foundation, which now runs The Humanion and everything else, that is part of it. The Foundation, once registered, will have an Asset Lock, which means that in any event, should The Foundation dissolve itself, all its existing assets shall go to a similar Social Enterprise. Therefore, we invite everyone to support The Foundation, support The Humanion in whatever way they can. And, there are endless number of ways people and organisations can support The Foundation and The Humanion.'' ::: ω.

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Yemen: They Keep on Fighting Killing and Devastating: WHO Keeps on Hospitals and Feeding Centres Alive in Yemen for the Most Desperate Yemenis Left Abandoned: 16.4 Millions are in Desperate Need of Healthcare

 
 


|| April 04: 2018 || ά. It takes Ms Aisha Jaafar one hour to reach the main health centre in Aslam district, Hajjah governorate, one of the most impoverished and remote areas of Yemen. The journey through bumpy and mountainous roads is necessary, as this mother is desperate to get treatment for her four-year-old daughter, Yusra, whose tiny body is weakened by acute malnutrition and bleeding diarrhoea. Like thousands of Yemenis, Ms Jaafar can not afford the cost of transportation to the nearest health centre. At times, she has no choice but to keep her sick daughter at home.

“I have to borrow money for transportation to the health centre and I, often, can not find anyone to lend it to me. I can not, even, afford to buy diapers for my daughter, who is constantly battling diarrhoea.” said she said. Severe financial hardship is not only faced by patients and their families; health workers, also, suffer the same challenges. “For months, I have not received a salary. Seeing all these destitute patients in great need, my people, is what motivates me to continue working in spite of the difficulties. If, I abandon these poor children, they will die.” said Mr Khadeejah Ahmed, a Nurse in a remote health centre in Hajjah governorate.

“Nearly all the people here are very poor and they really need us.” Recently, the WHO Representative to Yemen Dr Nevio Zagaria visited four districts in Hajjah plagued by poverty and fatal diseases. The aim of the visit was to discuss urgent health needs with local health authorities, enhance partnerships, and scale-up WHO support to health needs for people living in remote areas.

“People here struggle to receive, even, basic health services. As a result, malnutrition rates in this neglected part of the country are increasing. I was moved by the suffering of children on the verge of starvation, carried by their helpless mothers.” said Dr Zagaria. “Hajjah is one of several remote areas in Yemen, that is far from the main health centre, making access difficult for the most vulnerable.
 
To resolve this, we are decentralising the treatment of children with severe acute malnutrition and medical complications to local health centres, that are closer to affected communities. WHO is committed to strengthening healthcare delivery at district level in order increase people’s access to it, regardless of their location.”

In August 2016, WHO established its hub office in Hudaydah to further enhance WHO interventions in Hudayda and neighbouring governorates, including Hajjah. Since then, WHO has established four diarrhoea treatment centres and 14 oral rehydration corners to fight the spread of cholera and acute watery diarrhoea in the governorate. WHO, also, supports main hospitals in the governorate with essential medicines, fuel and water to keep them functioning. Five therapeutic feeding centres in five districts have, also, been set up and fixed medical teams are working in six districts.

“Despite the progress, more support is needed in remote areas that are extremely difficult to access due to their geographical and mountainous nature.” said Dr Zagaria.

An estimated 16.4 million Yemenis are in desperate need of healthcare. Through its Minimum Service Package, WHO aims to deliver basic health services to all people in need in Yemen, despite the ongoing conflict. “Even in times of crisis, health is a basic human right. No one should die just because they lack access to healthcare or can not afford the cost of transportation to the nearest health facility.” said Dr Zagaria ::: ω. 

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 Year Gamma Arkive 2017-18

Year Beta Arkive 2016-17

Year Alpha Arkive 2015-16

 
|| April 06: 2018 || ά. The Humanion was first published on September 24, 2015 and has been run, since that day, on a complete voluntary basis without any 'formal' or 'constituted' manner or form and, it was run on as a Human Enterprise, which is an idea of Humanics, in which, ownership is replaced by belongingship and, thus, in a Humanical Society, no one owns anything but everyone belongs to the whole as the whole belongs to everyone lawfully and equally and, it neither believes in nor makes money but human utilities, needs, aspirations, creativity, imagination and dreams are served without money, where everyone works and creates for all others as all others create and work for all others, thus, bringing in meaning and purpose to life along with it come natural justice, equality and liberty, that establish a true civilisation within the Rule of Law. And in one word, this system of human affairs management is called, Humanics and a society that runs itself in humanics is called a humanical society. Today, we have begun the process of 'constituting' this Human Enterprise, which does not exist in the current system, but the next closest thing to it, that exists in the UK Law is Social Enterprise. Therefore, today, Friday, April 06, 2018, we are beginning Regine Humanics Foundation, that is the 'Agency', that will lead, run, manage and develop everything, that The Humanion has been trying to do.

Regine Humanics Foundation is established by the Thinker, Author, Poet, Novelist, Playwright, Editor of The Humanion, Festival Director of London Poetry Festival and a Humanicsxian: hu: maa: neek: tian: One, that believes in, lives and exists by Humanics, Mr Munayem Mayenin, of London, England, United Kingdom. Mr Mayenin says, ''Humanics is a vision; people, may, call it, utopia, we, call it our Humanicsovicsopia; Humanics. Humanics is our philosophy, our faith, our conviction, our resolution, our way of existing, thinking, being and doing: to seek and try to do so in the determination that all we must do and be is to exist to advance the human condition. People, readers and agencies and organisations, from all across England, Scotland, Northern Ireland, Wales and the whole of the United Kingdom and Australasia, Africa, Asia, Europe, North and South America, from all walks and strata of life, have supported our endeavours, supported The Humanion and The Humanion Team, who volunteered their time to run things, since the beginning of The Humanion and long before that, when other things, that are now part of The Foundation, were developing. Nothing has changed in terms of the nature and value of what we have been seeking to do.''

''But the founding of The Foundation brings it all in a solid foundation so that we can keep on building this 'vision' so that it keeps on going regardless of who come to take the vision-mission of The Foundation forward. The Foundation runs along with time and along with the flowing humanity. This is the dream, this is the vision, this the hope in founding this Foundation. And, in this, we hope and invite all our readers, supporters, well wishers and all agencies and organisations to support our endeavours to build something, a Human Enterprise, which we are in the process of registering as a Social Enterprise, as a Community Interest Company, working for the common good of the one and common humanity. No one makes or takes profit out of The Foundation, which now runs The Humanion and everything else, that is part of it. The Foundation, once registered, will have an Asset Lock, which means that in any event, should The Foundation dissolve itself, all its existing assets shall go to a similar Social Enterprise. Therefore, we invite everyone to support The Foundation, support The Humanion in whatever way they can. And, there are endless number of ways people and organisations can support The Foundation and The Humanion.'' ::: ω.

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Life's Laurel Is You In One-Line-Poetry A Heaven-Bound Propagated Ray Of Light Off The Eye Of The Book Of Life: Love For You Are Only Once

 

 

Life: You Are The Law The Flow The Glow: In Joys In Hurts You Are The Vine-Songs On The Light-Trellis

 

 

 

 

   
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

|| All copyrights @ The Humanion: London: England: United Kingdom || Contact: The Humanion: editor at thehumanion.com || Regine Humanics Foundation Ltd: reginehumanics at reginehumanicsfoundation.com || Editor: Munayem Mayenin || First Published: September 24: 2015 ||
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