The Arkive
 
|| Year Delta: London: Monday: September 24: 2018: We Keep On Walking On The Path of Humanics ||
First Published: September 24: 2015
VII London Poetry Festival 2018: Sunday-Monday: October 14-15: 19:30-22:00
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Humanion

 

 

The Humanion UK Online Daily

As the Mother Earth Belongs to Every Single Human Being of the Humanion Regine Humanics Foundation Ltd and The Humanion Belong to All for We are a Human Enterprise: A Not for Profit Social Enterprise: Support Your Daily Quality Newspaper and Let Us Build an Institution That Will Flow with Time with the Rainbow Peoples of This Earth Far Into the Flowing Future: Support The Humanion: Support Regine Humanics Foundation

 

 

 

 

Political Philosophy

Anu Vehviläinen: Minister for 2000 Days: A Record of Public Service for Finland

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Political Philosophy Arkive Year Alpha and Year Beta

Year Gamma Arkive 2017-18

Year Beta Arkive 2016-17

Year Alpha Arkive 2015-16

End Homelessness The Humanion Campaign

Home is not where the heart is
Nor is it where things are kept 
A home is what skins the soul
Without it a human is non-person
Incomplete suffers slowly dying

END Homelessness


The Building-Block Foundational Human Rights: Without Establishing Foundational Human Rights Included in It a Universal Income for All Citizens Capitalism Can Not Go On the Way It Is: European Social Survey Finds Significant Public Support for Universal Basic Income

|| September 14: 2018 || ά. A new European Social Survey report has found significant public support in Europe for the introduction of universal basic income and a European Union-led social benefits scheme. Using European Social Survey data collected in 23 countries during 2016:17, the authors established that people in Europe widely endorse national government responsibility to protect vulnerable people. Whilst people are in favour of welfare support for the elderly, financial support for the unemployed and immigrants is met with more opposition by a considerable share of the population.

Is this ‘considerable opposition’ not related to the consideration that these have to do with ‘personal taxation’ so that the respondents respond from a ‘personal’ view-point. This is time to put forward the entirety of why capitalism has gone on for too long and has ‘created a shark-pool’ of the rich and riches while the vast chunk of societies are left with a horrible desperation and that does not mean just the unemployed and vulnerable people. It has been widely reported in the UK press that working people are queueing at foodbanks simply because in order to pay their rents and bills they have nothing else left to feed themselves. Foundational Human Rights is not ‘social security benefits’ nor are we speaking of ‘universal basic income’: we are speaking about foundational human rights and included in it is Universal Income, not as ‘benefit’ but as a share of the entire national wealth paid to all citizens of a nation.

And this Universal Income is not paid for any taxation or insurance contribution. How can that be done: humanics has answered these questions. It is time to wake up and see what capitalism has done to the desperately ‘sentenced’ people of Greece, the severest of cases while many European Union countries people are still paying for the crash and its aftermath. Capitalism can not be sustained as it is: people can not work and line the foodbank. People can not be part of any nation without a home and with access to education and much more besides. The old books are useless: it is time to create new ideas and bring capitalism to serve the people.

These are the Foundational Human Rights: A: Absolute Right to Live in Clean, Healthy, Safe and Natural Environment; B: Absolute Right to Breathe Natural, Fresh, Clean and Safe Air;  C: Absolute Right to Necessary Nutritional Balanced Food and Drink;  D: Absolute Right to Free Medical Care at the Point of Need;  E: Absolute Right to an Absolute Home;  F: Absolute Right to Free Degree-Level Education and Life Long Learning;  G: Absolute Right to Guaranteed Social Care;  H: Absolute Right to a Universal Income; I: Absolute Right to a Job;  J: Absolute Right to Dignified Civic and Human Funeral Paid Through by Universal Income. It is time that the world’s minds, who are concerned about the Human Condition look up and out into the world and the devastating human condition capitalism has created, particularly, after the crash and another crash will happen. It is time to challenge the status quo and think what is possible so that life is made better. It is time to challenge this view that in Europe life is all cosy and rosy! It is not: capitalism distributes poverty and inequality and keeps on increasing both so that it can gather vast chunks of the wealth to the tiny minority of the population.

The percentage of respondents, that support the introduction of a universal basic income scheme varies widely, from 33.9%, Norway to 80.4%, Lithuania. Support for a universal basic income is lower in more affluent countries in Northern and Western Europe and higher in the less wealthy welfare states in the East and South. Over 60% of respondents in Lithuania, Russia, Hungary, Israel, Slovenia and Portugal support the introduction of a universal basic income.

Lowest levels of support were found in Norway, Sweden and Switzerland. The report states: “This pattern suggests that basic income is welcomed as a way to improve social welfare rather than as a replacement for well-performing welfare systems.”

67.1% of those interviewed across Europe support the introduction of a EU-wide social benefit scheme, that would guarantee a minimum standard of living for the poor. But, on average, only three in ten Europeans, 30.5%, believe that more European Union involvement would lead to higher or much higher levels of social protection.

As with the introduction of basic income, support for EU involvement is higher amongst those in Eastern and Southern European countries, where welfare expenditure is relatively low. Over 80% of respondents in Portugal, Spain, Slovenia, Lithuania, Italy and Hungary support the introduction of a EU-wide social benefit scheme.

Only in Austria and The Netherlands was support for a EU-wide social benefit scheme below 50%.

Respondents were asked what should happen to someone’s unemployment benefit, if, they refuse to take a job, that pays less than what they earned previously. Over a quarter of respondents, 26.1%, felt that the full unemployment benefit should continue to be paid; 34.3% wanted to cut a small part of the benefit; 20.6% felt it should be cut in half and 19% felt it should be cut completely.

Support for cutting unemployment benefit in these circumstances is, particularly, high in Italy, Norway, Poland and Slovenia and comparatively low in Lithuania, Israel, Estonia and Russia. Italians are the most likely to want to limit unemployment benefit, if, someone refuses to take a job but think the government should take more financial responsibility for the unemployed.

The Polish do not expect high levels of unemployment benefit from their government and are most likely to support benefit reductions for those, who do not accept a job offer. The opposite is true of Israelis and Lithuanians, who believe the government should offer strong protection to the unemployed and tend to think that those, who turn down new work should not have their benefits cut.

The vast majority of people in Europe are open to allowing immigrants access to social benefits and services but with some conditions. The report’s authors found that fewer than 10% of respondents think that immigrants should never be allowed access to the welfare state, whilst only 09% believe that they should be granted full access to benefits and services immediately upon arrival.

43.1% of respondents think that social rights should be granted to immigrants following residence and payment of taxes for at least a year, with a further 29.1% thinking they should only be granted to citizens. When comparing responses to identical questions asked in Round Four, 2008:09 of the European Social Survey, the authors found no evidence that the refugee crisis led to more opposition to immigrants receiving social benefits:

“In Portugal and Spain, the percentage indicating that newcomers should receive social rights upon arrival has even increased substantially, from 09.6 to 20.3% in Portugal; from 11.7 to 18.9% in Spain.” Eastern Europeans are considerably more reluctant to provide social rights for immigrants despite relatively low immigration rates and lower levels of social security expenditure.

Support for the government to maintain acceptable living standards for the elderly is very high across Europe, especially, in areas where perceived living standards are currently lower. Public support for the government to provide for the elderly is highest in Israel, Iceland, Lithuania, Portugal, Russia and Spain.

In the Netherlands and Switzerland in particular, support for government responsibility is lower but, may, partl,  be attributed to the perception that the elderly have relatively higher living standards.

The Report: The Past, Present and Future of European Welfare States was authored by: Bart Meuleman, Wim van Oorschot, Sharon Baute, Sam Delespaul, Dimitri Gugushvili, Tijs Laenen and Federica Rossetti: University of Leuven, Belgium and Femke Roosma:Tilburg University, The Netherlands.

The European Social Survey is an academically led biennial cross-national social survey, that was created in 2001. It aims to chart change and stability in the social fabric of Europe. It was awarded European Research Infrastructure Consortium:ERIC status in 2013.

Round Eight of the European Social Survey was fielded in 23 countries during late 2016 and early 2017. The total sample size was 43,507 ranging from 880 respondents in Iceland to 2,852 respondents in Germany.

Read the Report :::ω.

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V PRAT Conference 2018 New York: October 26-27 Calls for Submissions: By September 05

 



|| August 18: 2018 || ά Mass incarceration in the United States has become a dehumanising force that is de-stroying the very fabric of society. Many young lives have wilted and many more are languishing in the penitentiaries for minor offenses and too often for no offense whatsoever. The racialisation of the criminal injustice system has resulted in the separation and impoverishment of families and the decimation of neighbourhoods.
In many communities one of the greatest barriers to a decent education is the de-praved influence of the prison-industrial complex. For human beings to flourish, it is essential that they receive a “universal” form of education capable of nurturing the emotional, psychological, physical and intellectual growth of the whole person. To bring about a humane society, we need to change the trajectory currently leading to mass incarceration, redirecting it toward universal education and potentially recast-ing the social, political, and economic structures of the country. For such transform-ative education to take hold, we must eliminate pedagogies of oppression and repres-sion and free intellectual inquiry from established forms of monopoly control.
Consequently, at the conference we will seek to move beyond policies to effective practice, by exploring such difficult questions as the following:

:Can universal education unlock an entrenched system of unjust laws?
:Can uni-versal education serve as an essential instrument both in reversing criminalization of the poor and in eradicating the prison-industrial complex?
:Can education be emancipated from cultural imperialism?
:Can effective resistance be mobilised against harmful institutional models, such as zero tolerance policies and high-stakes testing requirements?
:Are we suffering from a poverty of imagination among many educational “reform-ers?”
:Can awareness of available “best practices” encourage more innovative thinking?
:To what extent can socio-economic relationships, political systems and cultural productions be redirected toward empathy, community, cooperation, and human dignity?
:Can we truly succeed in building a just and humane society?

If, you plan to present, please, send a title and a brief abstract to: J. Everet Green at everet at verizon.net by September 05: 2018.

Conference Venues: Friday, October 26, 10:00 am to 18:00: Graduate Centre of the City University of New York. 365 Fifth Avenue.
Saturday, October 27, 10:00 am to 18:00: May Day Space in Brooklyn, 176 Saint Nicholas Avenue::::ω.
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The Non-Americans in America: Six Million is As Large a Number As to Be Equivalent of Many Nations in This World: America Can Not Punish Them with Political Annihilation: This Must Change for the Sake of America Itself

 

 

 

|| August 03: 2018 || ά. The Truth Out has published a new piece of research, written by Ms Kimberly R Kras, who is an Assistant Professor of Criminology and Justice Studies at the University of Massachusetts Lowell, today. This piece, ‘Citizenship Through the Eyes of Those Who Have Lost the Right to Vote’ is a timely and much needed piece of work to put to America and the American people, to bring about a debate for it is about the ‘political annihilation’ of a section of the ‘we the people’ of America, the number of which is unbelievably high: in this piece Ms Kras has put forward a figure, six million Americans can not vote in any American democratic exercise because they have been convicted of a felony.

And this scenario varies from state to state but in many states these people, despite the fact that they have served their time and ‘paid’ for the felony for which they were convicted and, yet, they can not vote. It is, as, if, they had been given two parallel sentences: one with finite end date and the other one ‘in perpetuam’, that it does not get spent! This is astonishing. Ms Kras reported some progressive actions taken by some states to balance this injustice out and corrected the state laws but this is not enough. What kind of a democracy is it where six million people are barred from taking part in exercising their citizenship rights? Further, whatever crime any criminal of whatever sorts commits, they can not and do not and must not lose their citizenships for, if, they were to lose their citizenship by virtue of that loss the ‘state’ loses any ‘right’ to accuse, charge and try them in its ow court of law because the ‘criminal’ is no longer its citizen. The state can only try its own citizens!

Further, citizenship of any state is not a ‘gift’ or ‘privilege’ nor ‘honour’ or ‘accolade’ given to individuals; it is people’s right by ‘defined virtues’ by the ‘book of the law’ or a Constitution of a country in which it is enshrined as a right of citizens and there are defined ways of getting that citizenship, including, often, simply, being born in that country or to parents, who are already citizens of that country. Therefore, because it is a right and as such so long a constitution remains valid, so long this state remains a member of the international body, i.e, the United Nations and all its mechanism, this state, simply, can not withdraw citizenship. It is against international law for a state to ‘revoke’ or take away people’s citizenship. It is not a matter of people’s opinion nor is it a matter of whether a majority wants it or not: there is such a thing as the law and this is the law: a state can not take away citizenships from its own citizens.

Furthermore, the criminals are still citizens and they were charged and tried and punished for their crimes and they are sent to prison and they serve their term. The incarceration, the taking away of one’s liberty and all forms of, other than the very bare physiological level, of life from the criminals is the highest form of ‘punishment’ for their crimes, which they serve. If, this includes, that they can not vote while serving the sentences, the state has some reasons to offer some form of an argument in relation to that but it can not sustain a sentence with reason and rational validity of taking away people’s rights to take part in the democratic process for the rest of their lives!

It is desperately sad and dangerous for a democracy to ignore and not to seek to rectify it, particularly, as Ms Kras’ research points out that the majority of these six million are poor and people of various ethnicities other than white. These two criteria: that they all are poor and that they are coming from all ethnic minorities, might, give us the idea as to how this has gone on for so long! But it can not go on any longer and we urge all progressive forces, voices and agencies to bring this issue to the forefront of the political debates and discourse. We suggest that the leaders in all spheres of societies across America in all its states form some form of a ‘State Law Review Convention’ of some sorts, this is unheard of but possible and all state legislatures work together under this convention mechanism and identify the variations in laws relating this ‘political annihilation’ of six million people’ in all the states and agree a ‘common course of corrective actions’, which, they, then, take to their local chambers and change their laws or send it up with a common resolution by all state legislatures to the Congress to Pass a Common Law, that will be applied to all states.

This can not go on as this: a nation can not defend ‘politically killing off’ six million of its own people from the national life. This is a bankrupt approach and it can not be accepted and acceptable. Democracy, if, it is, at all, about the ‘government of the people, by the people for the people’ then these ‘people’ are and can not but be deemed as humans, to mean that they are not all 100% ‘angels and angelic and all-perfect and all unfailingly uniformed. In this some of these people for vary many reasons, factors and influences will be failed and they themselves, may, fail themselves but for that they will ‘pay’ but that does not mean that that should declare them ‘politically dead’ forever.

This can not be supported or sustained. America must rise to challenge and change this utter and sheer injustice since by its actions of the current law, America has, effectively, declared six million people as, first, not part of ‘we the people’, because they are not, because they can not vote and, second, that they are not human in the sense that they should have been perfect but since they were not they no longer have the means to correct themselves and seek to make amend and rebuilt a new life, even, after they have served their times for what they did! In the first lesson on the American Constitution, this would tell a child that this is against the first sentence of the American Constitution: We the people for, effectively, these six million souls are not part of that ‘we the people’. If, American establishment fails in this it is the American people, who can not and must not fail in rectifying this injustice. We thank The Truth Out and Ms Kras for this work and, along with it, invite every single person reading this, to do all they can to support this brave and committed publication for these are the true champions of the people, who tirelessly bring to the surface, what no one would speak of, yet, these are vitally fundamental issues of society and the humanity, that lives in any society.

The Truth Out: ‘’Truth Out is a 501:c:3 non-profit organisation dedicated to providing independent news and commentary on a daily basis. Truthout works to spark action by revealing systemic injustice and providing a platform for transformative ideas, through in-depth investigative reporting and critical analysis. With a powerful, independent voice, we will spur the revolution in consciousness and inspire the direct action that is necessary to save the planet and humanity.’’ :::ω.

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Regine Humanics Foundation Begins Its Journey Today: The Humanion Is Now A Regine Humanics Foundation Publication

 
 

 


|| April 06: 2018 || ά. The Humanion was first published on September 24, 2015 and has been run, since that day, on a complete voluntary basis without any 'formal' or 'constituted' manner or form and, it was run on as a Human Enterprise, which is an idea of Humanics, in which, ownership is replaced by belongingship and, thus, in a Humanical Society, no one owns anything but everyone belongs to the whole as the whole belongs to everyone lawfully and equally and, it neither believes in nor makes money but human utilities, needs, aspirations, creativity, imagination and dreams are served without money, where everyone works and creates for all others as all others create and work for all others, thus, bringing in meaning and purpose to life along with it come natural justice, equality and liberty, that establish a true civilisation within the Rule of Law. And in one word, this system of human affairs management is called, Humanics and a society that runs itself in humanics is called a humanical society. Today, we have begun the process of 'constituting' this Human Enterprise, which does not exist in the current system, but the next closest thing to it, that exists in the UK Law is Social Enterprise. Therefore, today, Friday, April 06, 2018, we are beginning Regine Humanics Foundation, that is the 'Agency', that will lead, run, manage and develop everything, that The Humanion has been trying to do.

Regine Humanics Foundation is established by the Thinker, Author, Poet, Novelist, Playwright, Editor of The Humanion, Festival Director of London Poetry Festival and a Humanicsxian: hu: maa: neek: tian: One, that believes in, lives and exists by Humanics, Mr Munayem Mayenin, of London, England, United Kingdom. Mr Mayenin says, ''Humanics is a vision; people, may, call it, utopia, we, call it our Humanicsovicsopia; Humanics. Humanics is our philosophy, our faith, our conviction, our resolution, our way of existing, thinking, being and doing: to seek and try to do so in the determination that all we must do and be is to exist to advance the human condition. People, readers and agencies and organisations, from all across England, Scotland, Northern Ireland, Wales and the whole of the United Kingdom and Australasia, Africa, Asia, Europe, North and South America, from all walks and strata of life, have supported our endeavours, supported The Humanion and The Humanion Team, who volunteered their time to run things, since the beginning of The Humanion and long before that, when other things, that are now part of The Foundation, were developing. Nothing has changed in terms of the nature and value of what we have been seeking to do.''

''But the founding of The Foundation brings it all in a solid foundation so that we can keep on building this 'vision' so that it keeps on going regardless of who come to take the vision-mission of The Foundation forward. The Foundation runs along with time and along with the flowing humanity. This is the dream, this is the vision, this the hope in founding this Foundation. And, in this, we hope and invite all our readers, supporters, well wishers and all agencies and organisations to support our endeavours to build something, a Human Enterprise, which we are in the process of registering as a Social Enterprise, as a Community Interest Company, working for the common good of the one and common humanity. No one makes or takes profit out of The Foundation, which now runs The Humanion and everything else, that is part of it. The Foundation, once registered, will have an Asset Lock, which means that in any event, should The Foundation dissolve itself, all its existing assets shall go to a similar Social Enterprise. Therefore, we invite everyone to support The Foundation, support The Humanion in whatever way they can. And, there are endless number of ways people and organisations can support The Foundation and The Humanion.'' ::: ω.

 

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To Seek: To Do: To Change: To Make Better: A Courtney Anderson an Assistant Professor of Law: Atlanta Listen When A Voice Calls You Towards the Light of Equity: Where the Major Part of the Whole Bleeds Away There Can Be No Dream But Nightmare: Rise Towards the American Dream Away From the American Nightmare of Rampant Poverty Inequality and Contemptuous Disregard to Human Misery and Suffering Imposed on a Great Majority of People

 

|| November 25: 2017: Georgia State University News || ά. Assistant Professor Courtney Anderson champions housing issues to break cycle of poverty. Community can be a matter of life and death. South Seattle knows this hard fact. Residents there rise each morning in a grinding urban neighbourhood with high unemployment and substandard housing. Just one mile distant, over a body of water, that, might, as well, be an ocean, lies Mercer Island, one of the 100 wealthiest ZIP codes in the United States. A baby born today on Mercer Island can expect to live 10 years longer than a baby born in South Seattle.

Life expectancy isn’t the only discrepancy between wealthy communities and poor ones. Low-income areas typically see higher rates of crime, disease, mental illness and drug addiction. That’s true in Seattle. It’s true in Los Angeles, Detroit, Baltimore, Miami. It’s true in Atlanta. In South Atlanta, Thomasville Heights Elementary School and its surrounding neighbourhood share a ZIP code with a federal penitentiary. There’s no building boom in this blighted section of one of America’s fastest-growing cities. In fact, substandard housing across the street from 600-student Thomasville Heights is considered the leading cause of a shocking year-over-year turnover rate in classrooms there.

From one year to the next, 40 percent of the students at Thomasville Heights go away. Some families leave the housing complex after complaining of intolerable conditions, structural damage, dilapidation, infestations of snakes, rodents, insects. Others, who can’t find the means to pay rent move on because of eviction notices. What happens to kids in this unstable circumstance? And their community in the long run? Georgia State Law Assistant Professor Courtney Anderson has done her homework. “The concentration of housing for low-income families in impoverished neighbourhoods adversely affects educational attainment.” Ms Anderson said. “Ultimately, this, also, impacts the opportunity for poor children to break the cycle of poverty as adults.”

Substandard housing affects more than grades and graduations. People in shoddy dwellings more often suffer respiratory and cardiovascular troubles from smoke and indoor air pollution. They’re frequently exposed to high and low temperatures. Home injuries occur more often, floors or steps give way, roofs collapse, wiring shorts out. Sanitation problems can spread communicable diseases. More frequent diagnoses of allergies, asthma and mould-borne ailments add to woes.

Unravelling the knotted problems of housing, education and health takes a champion, someone willing to build awareness about problems in communities that often have no voice. Anderson has made it her cause.

Ms Anderson first grasped the link between housing and community health issues, when she served as a clinical fellow at Georgetown University Law Centre in 2012. “We worked very closely with low-income tenant organisations, who were attempting to purchase their buildings.” she said. “The need for health services, education and other social services was always prevalent.” Ms Anderson quickly realised that the needs of these clients stretched far beyond memos on legal letterhead or simple words of legal advice. That revelation shaped her teaching and research.

“We were our clients’ only advocates.” she said. “They told us how hard it was for them to access social services and education because of where they lived. We realised how many ancillary issues stemmed from the disparities in their communities … and we were the only ones, who could help.” Connecting the community dots, Ms Anderson began to actively research housing instability in low-income neighbourhoods.

“I work with sociologists, attorneys, educators and bankers to create a map of neighbourhood stressors near schools with high turnover rates.” she said. “Once we have that, we can better understand how educational attainment is disrupted by evictions, building code violations and mobility.”

Ms Anderson has published several notable papers exploring how events or conditions, that touch any part of housing, education or health in underserved neighbourhoods have a ripple effect in the other areas. Her titles describe the work: 'The Disparate Impact of Shuttered Schools' in the Journal of Gender, Social Policy and the Law in 2015, 'Affirmative Action for Affordable Housing' in Howard Law Journal in 2016, 'You Cannot Afford to Live Here' in Fordham Urban Law Journal this year.

Perhaps, most importantly, of all, Ms Anderson ventures out from the ivory tower of academia to hit the streets and she rides along with a posse. “Her students are challenged to understand, form an opinion and make an impact to curb health disparities and her work is shedding light on some of the health and housing disparities in Georgia.” said Ms Genevieve Razick. Each year loads her Law and Health Equity class onto a bus and tools them up Peachtree Road and through ritzy Buckhead.

The students admire Buckhead’s fine houses and jewelled lawns and glittering automobiles. Then, in jarring contrast, the student bus veers southward into grindingly poor Atlanta neighbourhoods. The houses there have shuttered windows and trash-strewn lawns and abandoned cars.

“It really opens the students’ eyes to a part of Atlanta they have never seen, despite the fact that it is five minutes away from the law school.” Ms Anderson said. “We go from wealthy neighbourhoods in North Atlanta to abject poverty that is not far from where they live and learn. The purpose is to give our law students context for how segregated cities can be and how 
human-made factors influence and cause this segregation.”

Newly enlightened, Ms Anderson’s students then are urged to bring their budding legal skills to bear in service to the challenged communities they’ve seen. Like many Georgia State Law students, a large number of these future lawyers have Atlanta roots or close community ties. It’s not uncommon for them to suddenly develop a passion for community efforts driven by various non-profits.

“The Atlanta Volunteers Lawyer Foundation, Sister Love and New Georgia Project have been great at identifying and assisting with the variety of issues, that affect low-income populations.” Ms Anderson said. “Our students offer hands-on, real-world help.”

Ms Genevieve Razick took Ms Anderson’s classes in Property Law, Law and Health Equity and Law and Social Welfare. Ms Razick now practices as an associate attorney at Arnall Golden Gregory, where she focuses on regulatory and transactional work for health care clients. “Professor Anderson is truly passionate about bringing topics covered in class to life for her students so they aren’t just reading another chapter in a textbook.” Ms Razick said.

“Her students are challenged to understand, form an opinion and make an impact to curb health disparities and her work is shedding light on some of the health and housing disparities in Georgia.” During her semester in Anderson’s Law and Health Equity class, Ms Razick supported Sister Love Inc, an organisation serving to eradicate the disproportionate impact of HIV and sexual oppression on women in the United States.

“My Georgia State team helped Sister Love conduct legal research on the frameworks surrounding sexual reproductive education in schools in Georgia.” Ms Razick said. “We looked at how access to sexual reproductive education could potentially impact the prevalence of HIV in a community.”

Ms Anderson’s students lend their legal expertise to other allies, too. Some support the work of Neighbourhood Planning Units, citizen advisory councils that research and develop zoning, land use and other planning recommendations designed to address health disparities and inequalities. Their recommendations go directly to Atlanta’s Mayor and City Council.

Other students have pitched in with the Atlanta Youth Count and Needs Assessment, a comprehensive survey of youth homelessness in the city. One of Ms Anderson’s students worked with Westside Atlanta Land Trust. That pairing resulted in a program proposal to train ex-criminal offenders in construction trades, that can help them land jobs renovating blighted homes in a depressed area at Vine City:English Avenue. Breakthrough thinking is badly needed in that area.

Mr Paul Bolster feels that efforts to cut through a Gordian Knot of problems to find solutions in housing, health and education policy depend on leadership, the path-breaking research and advocacy like Ms Anderson’s, but, also, political and legal leadership. “I believe it takes legislative or executive department leadership to give a focus to citizen advocacy.” Mr Bolster said.

“For any public policy change, there needs to be a legislative leader to make decisions and create partnerships, that will lead to legislation. The courts can provide a context for the legislation and often political cover for taking actions that may not be popular or may get lost in the din of public discussion. Leadership can make an issue a priority for research, public debate and ultimately legislative action.”

Mr Bolster does his part. He founded and serves as principle consultant for Support Housing LLC, an organisation assisting communities with plans to end homelessness. He co-develops supportive housing with service providers and organizes advocacy efforts focused on state and local policy issues. He founded the Georgia Supportive Housing Association, where he is its former executive director.

“Her research is important.” he said. “Connecting housing to health and education is critical to public investment in the housing.” Ms Anderson’s leadership in housing and health policy could possibly lead to big changes at Thomasville Heights Elementary School. In the past two years, students in her Property Law classes worked with Purpose Built Schools to explore the underlying causes of churn problems at the educational institution.

Students pulled eviction records and documentation on housing conditions. They cross-referenced demographics to identify and map the issues, that impact Thomasville students’ ability to attend school. Now, late this fall, Purpose Built Schools will hold a meeting to evaluate student recommendations based on that research and, possibly, adopt those ideas in coming years.

Quality housing and reduced student turnover in the neighbourhood that Thomasville Heights’ student body calls home could arrest the cycle of poverty in the area. In other words, two components of a true community, a stable, liveable home and a classroom, where familiar teachers and classmates show up reliably and faithfully, could, potentially, anchor the area and give it a chance at normal development. “Leadership can make an issue a priority for research, public debate and ultimately legislative action.” said Mr Paul Bolster.

A true sense of community remains a dream deferred, Ms Anderson feels, without secure, protective, sheltering places to live, schools to spark ideas and health to support hope. “We are far from the goal.” she said. “But awareness that there are these issues has definitely improved and there has been more of an interdisciplinary approach to addressing them. Housing agencies are now opining on education policies and vice versa.

Improving health equity will come with improving race relations and improvements in economic inequality.” she added. “I think the focus right now still needs to be on awareness and education, with local groups taking the lead on testing possible solutions that can be replicated so that there can be more buy-in when they are proven effective.” 
ω.

Image: Carolyn Richardson: Georgia State University

Whatever Your Field of Work and Wherever in the World You are, Please, Make a Choice to Do All You Can to Seek and Demand the End of Death Penalty For It is Your Business What is Done in Your Name. The Law That Makes Humans Take Part in Taking Human Lives and That Permits and Kills Human Lives is No Law. It is the Rule of the Jungle Where Law Does Not Exist. The Humanion

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 Year Gamma Arkive 2017-18

Year Beta Arkive 2016-17

Year Alpha Arkive 2015-16

 
|| April 06: 2018 || ά. The Humanion was first published on September 24, 2015 and has been run, since that day, on a complete voluntary basis without any 'formal' or 'constituted' manner or form and, it was run on as a Human Enterprise, which is an idea of Humanics, in which, ownership is replaced by belongingship and, thus, in a Humanical Society, no one owns anything but everyone belongs to the whole as the whole belongs to everyone lawfully and equally and, it neither believes in nor makes money but human utilities, needs, aspirations, creativity, imagination and dreams are served without money, where everyone works and creates for all others as all others create and work for all others, thus, bringing in meaning and purpose to life along with it come natural justice, equality and liberty, that establish a true civilisation within the Rule of Law. And in one word, this system of human affairs management is called, Humanics and a society that runs itself in humanics is called a humanical society. Today, we have begun the process of 'constituting' this Human Enterprise, which does not exist in the current system, but the next closest thing to it, that exists in the UK Law is Social Enterprise. Therefore, today, Friday, April 06, 2018, we are beginning Regine Humanics Foundation, that is the 'Agency', that will lead, run, manage and develop everything, that The Humanion has been trying to do.

Regine Humanics Foundation is established by the Thinker, Author, Poet, Novelist, Playwright, Editor of The Humanion, Festival Director of London Poetry Festival and a Humanicsxian: hu: maa: neek: tian: One, that believes in, lives and exists by Humanics, Mr Munayem Mayenin, of London, England, United Kingdom. Mr Mayenin says, ''Humanics is a vision; people, may, call it, utopia, we, call it our Humanicsovicsopia; Humanics. Humanics is our philosophy, our faith, our conviction, our resolution, our way of existing, thinking, being and doing: to seek and try to do so in the determination that all we must do and be is to exist to advance the human condition. People, readers and agencies and organisations, from all across England, Scotland, Northern Ireland, Wales and the whole of the United Kingdom and Australasia, Africa, Asia, Europe, North and South America, from all walks and strata of life, have supported our endeavours, supported The Humanion and The Humanion Team, who volunteered their time to run things, since the beginning of The Humanion and long before that, when other things, that are now part of The Foundation, were developing. Nothing has changed in terms of the nature and value of what we have been seeking to do.''

''But the founding of The Foundation brings it all in a solid foundation so that we can keep on building this 'vision' so that it keeps on going regardless of who come to take the vision-mission of The Foundation forward. The Foundation runs along with time and along with the flowing humanity. This is the dream, this is the vision, this the hope in founding this Foundation. And, in this, we hope and invite all our readers, supporters, well wishers and all agencies and organisations to support our endeavours to build something, a Human Enterprise, which we are in the process of registering as a Social Enterprise, as a Community Interest Company, working for the common good of the one and common humanity. No one makes or takes profit out of The Foundation, which now runs The Humanion and everything else, that is part of it. The Foundation, once registered, will have an Asset Lock, which means that in any event, should The Foundation dissolve itself, all its existing assets shall go to a similar Social Enterprise. Therefore, we invite everyone to support The Foundation, support The Humanion in whatever way they can. And, there are endless number of ways people and organisations can support The Foundation and The Humanion.'' ::: ω.

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Life: You Are The Law The Flow The Glow: In Joys In Hurts You Are The Vine-Songs On The Light-Trellis

 

 

 

 

   
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

|| All copyrights @ The Humanion: London: England: United Kingdom || Contact: The Humanion: editor at thehumanion.com || Regine Humanics Foundation Ltd: reginehumanics at reginehumanicsfoundation.com || Editor: Munayem Mayenin || First Published: September 24: 2015 ||
|| Regine Humanics Foundation Ltd: A Human Enterprise: Registered as a Not For Profit Social Enterprise in England and Wales: Company No: 11346648 ||