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 First Published: September 24: 2015
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Music Arkive

Year Alpha and Year Beta

 

To Read the Stories Published in Music Section in September-December 2015

To Find My Way Back Home: Looking for Your Heart: May Be Erja Lyytinen Can Tell You a Blue or Two About That: Stolen Hearts UK Tour: September 20-26

 

 

|| September 14: 2017  || ά. She has sung herself with her guitar being the wind of the white hues of the blues and the blues of the daze of the white solitude of Finnish landscape, where the lilies do not quite know whether the water is transparent or blue or white or nothing but a flowing unity, that simply is: both concurrent and eternally in one instance: breathtaking. And she has risen and spread her wings to the world of blues. Her blues and guitar playing are her blues: these are Erja Lyytinen-Blues. And will you be glad that you have attended her Stolen Hearts UK Tour, starting on September 20 for six days? The tour follows hot on the heels of her critically acclaimed new album Stolen Hearts , released on CD, 180 gram vinyl and digital download.

Erja's Stolen Hearts UK Tour, September 20-26. Dates include Sheffield Greystones: September 20, Edinburgh: The Caves: September 21, Nottingham Bodega: September 22, Chester Live Rooms: September 23, Manchester: Band on the Wall: September 24, London: Borderline: September 25 and Bristol: The Tunnels: September 26. Well, if you were not absolutely blown away by Erja's blues magic, this is the week The Humanion celebrates its third anniversary, so we will offer you this guarantee: write to us with your complaint and we shall get Sibelius Administration up and running to deal with your complaint! And if, by any chance, you are looking for your heart, this is the chance to get to hear Erja do a song and play about the stolen heart, that might offer you some clues as to where to go and look for it or rather just give up for, she says, it has been stolen and with no hope of getting it back because that is why she has been seeking to find her way back home.

Well, here, in The Elleesium, there is always space, place and shape of a home for all those, who are eternally lost for only than they will remain eternally searching and that is a beautiful state of being: to keep on searching and finding wonders and magic, and along with it, sing like Erja and play the guitar like Beethoven played the Piano. And do go to any of the concert taking place across the UK for it is not every day you will come across an Erja Lyytinen. The best way to try to pronounce her name would be, e as in error and ja as in ya so Erya and lyy, nearest English would be lu as in Lucy but actually, it is not like it, will have to do, because it is rather different an u, but try Lucy's u, may be, a little longer but it must not become u as in oo. Thus, you arrive at Erya sounds like area, except, in Finnish, it is Er Ya not eria.

So, here we have Erya Lutinen. But the t is not as the English t, try th as in Thomas and now you have Erya Luthinen! Why do they have to make their language so difficult! Well, that is because this language is, probably, one of the oldest, continuously living human languages, that exist in the world, so that it is almost equivalent to Chinese civilisation in linguistic terms! If you want to find out more, try reading the Finnish epic, The Kalevala and see the world, culture, religion and belief systems and social norms depicted there, that would predate any other existing world epics. It is that old! Now, this is our theory, this is our hypothesis. Finland, may be, one hundred years old as a country, as a nation but she is an eternal soul, going on and on and along this journey Erja joins in and sings and plays all blues. And along with it we are here, joined in this flow, reporting about the soundscapes Erja Lyytinen is determined to make.

Tickets are priced at £12.50, can be ordered from the debit:credit card hotline number 01472 349 222, between09:00 and 17:00 from here or booked directly at the venue box offices.

The tour will feature songs from her critically acclaimed album 'Stolen Hearts', mixed by and vocals recorded by the legendary Chris Kimsey, The Rolling Stones, Bad Company, Marillion, Peter Frampton.
ω.

Whatever Your Field of Work and Wherever in the World You are, Please, Make a Choice to Do All You Can to Seek and Demand the End of Death Penalty For It is Your Business What is Done in Your Name. The Law That Makes Humans Take Part in Taking Human Lives and That Permits and Kills Human Lives is No Law. It is the Rule of the Jungle Where Law Does Not Exist. The Humanion

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Southbank Centre Begins a Global Celebrations of Classical Music: September 2017-June 2018: The-Absolute-Must-Finland Kaija Saariaho Conducting: Since Sibelius No One Has Composed as New as Ground-Shifting as Experimental as Ambitious and as Out of the Universe Music as Kaija Saariaho: Finland Must Celebrate Her Work More and Take Her to the World and World Humanity

 

 

|| September 01: 2017 || ά.

Reflecting the changing landscape of classical music, Southbank Centre’s 2017-18 season puts innovation, technology and new music in all its programming, with an international outlook, seeking to mirror the world today. September ees five world and UK premieres; leading British and international artists, including, Mr Esa-Pekka Salonen, Mr Vladimir Jurowski, Mr Francesco Tristano, Sir Willard White, Dame Felicity Palmer and Mr Pierre-Laurent Aimard, who gives his first performance as Southbank Centre Artist in Residence and the return of Darbar Festival for its twelfth edition.

As part of Southbank Centre’s year-long exploration of Norse culture, Norse Matters, the season opens with a major celebration of Norse music, including, the first UK edition of leading contemporary music festival Norse Music Days. Across four days, the Southbank Centre site plays host to pioneering composers, sound artists and performers from the region, including, The-Absolute-Must-Finland Ms Kaija Saariaho, Mr Anders Hillborg, Mr Bent Sørensen, Ms Anna Thorvaldsdottir and Finnish violinist Mr Pekka Kuusisto, who performs the UK premiere of Daníel Bjarnason’s Violin Concerto. Coinciding with the festival is the return of the Virtual Orchestra, the first major virtual reality initiative from a UK symphony orchestra, featuring Sibelius’s Fifth Symphony in partnership with Philharmonia Orchestra and Mr Esa-Pekka Salonen.

September highlights include the first UK edition of Norse Music Days, one of the world’s oldest music festivals, with four days of pioneering music by Norse composers and sound artists performed by some of the UK’s most exciting ensembles. A wide-ranging programme of talks, workshops, family events, sound sculptures and an audiovisual Northern Lights lounge, all free to attend: September 28-October 01.

Return of the Virtual Orchestra, the first major virtual reality initiative from a UK symphony orchestra, in partnership with Philharmonia Orchestra and Mr Esa-Pekka Salonen. Darbar Festival, the biggest celebration of Indian classical music outside of South Asia, returns for its twelfth edition featuring the UK premiere of Shankar Mahadevan’s ‘Krishna’. Belief and Beyond Belief, Southbank Centre’s year-long festival in partnership with London Philharmonic Orchestra and conductor Mr Vladimir Jurowski continues with three concerts.

Acclaimed pianist Mr Francesco Tristano presents the UK premiere performance of his new album, Piano Circle Songs. Southbank Centre’s International Organ Series returns for the 2017:18 season, opening with the organist of St Paul’s Cathedral, Simon Johnson, who performs his own contribution to the Orgelbüchlein Project.

Southbank Centre Associate Orchestra Aurora Orchestra and conductor Nicholas Collon are joined by Mr Pierre-Laurent Aimard, who gives his first performance as a Southbank Centre Artist in Residence, with Messiaen's Oiseaux exotiques, part of a programme exploring birdsong and human's relationship with the natural world.

Southbank Centre Resident Orchestra, Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment, performs the world premiere of Sally Beamish’s The Judas Passion.

Looking further ahead in the season, international artists and orchestras include Daniel Barenboim and West-Eastern Divan Orchestra, Sir Simon Rattle and Berliner Philharmoniker, Richard Tognetti and the Australian Chamber Orchestra, Ensemble Intercontemporain and Matthias Pintscher, Spira Mirabilis, Emerson Quartet, Navarra Quartet, Associate Artists Marin Alsop and Colin Currie, soloists Danielle de Niese, Mitsuko Uchida, Maurizio Pollini, Leif Ove Andsnes, Patricia Kopatchinskaja, Stephen Hough, Paul Lewis, Khatia Buniatishvili, Steven Osborne, James Ehnes, Alban Gerhardt, Kian Soltani, Benjamin Grosvenor and more.

Further classical music highlights for 2017 include International Orchestras: Saturday, October 14, 2017-Thursday, May May 31, 2018

International Orchestras appearing at Southbank Centre in 2017 include Ensemble Intercontemporain and conductor Mr Matthias Pintscher, October 14, Mr Daniel Barenboim and his West-Eastern Divan Orchestra performing a concert in memory of Jacqueline du Pré and in aid of the MS Society, October 28, and Australian Chamber Orchestra, conducted by Mr Richard Tognetti and featuring pianist and Southbank Centre newly appointed Artist in Residence Mr Pierre-Laurent Aimard: November 03.

International Piano Series: Thursday, October 05, 2017-Tuesday, June 05, 2018: Southbank Centre’s International Piano Series returns for the 2017-18 season, opening with Mr Bertrand Chamayou at St John’s Smith Square: October 05). The series continues with three performances as part of Southbank Centre’s year-long programme Norse Matters: Ms Alice Sara Ott, performing works by Grieg: October 17, celebrated Norwegian pianist Mr Leif Ove Andsnes, performing works by Sibelius: October 31 and rising Icelandic star Mr Víkingur Ólafsson: November 15. The remaining two concerts as part of the series in 2017 feature the great Ms Mitsuko Uchida, who continues her three-year collaboration with Southbank Centre exploring Schubert’s Sonatas at Royal Festival Hall, November 28 and December 01.

International Chamber Music Series: Tuesday, October 31, 201-Tuesday, May 29, 2018: Southbank Centre’s International Chamber Music Series returns for the 2017-18 season, opening with two concerts by the nine time Grammy-award-winning Emerson Quartet performing Beethoven’s late quartets at St John’s Smith Square, October 31 and November 01). The series continues with a performance of Messiaen's Quartet for the End of Time featuring soloists Mr Steven Osborne, Mr James Ehnes, Mr Alban Gerhardt and Ms Jean Johnson.

International Organ Series: Monday, September 25-Tuesday, April 24, 2018: Following Simon Johnson’s recital on September 25, the series continues with Ms Anne Page, who returns to Royal Festival Hall to perform Bach’s last composition, left unfinished at his death, Die Kunst der Fuge: November 21. ω.

About Southbank Centre: Southbank Centre is the UK’s largest arts centre, occupying a 17­ acre site that sits in the midst of London’s most vibrant cultural quarter on the South Bank of the Thames. The site has an extraordinary creative and architectural history stretching back to the 1951 Festival of Britain. Southbank Centre is home to the Royal Festival Hall, Queen Elizabeth Hall, Purcell Room and Hayward Gallery as well as The National Poetry Library and the Arts Council Collection. ω.

Whatever Your Field of Work and Wherever in the World You are, Please, Make a Choice to Do All You Can to Seek and Demand the End of Death Penalty For It is Your Business What is Done in Your Name. The Law That Makes Humans Take Part in Taking Human Lives and That Permits and Kills Human Lives is No Law. It is the Rule of the Jungle Where Law Does Not Exist. The Humanion

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The Immortal 32: Lifschitz's Beethoven Cycle at the Grand Hall Lee Shau Kee Lecture Centre University of Hong Kong: September 15-24

Image: University of Hong Kong


|| July 24: 2017: University of Hong Kong News || ά. Frequently referred to as the 'New Testament' of piano music, Beethoven’s set of 32 sonatas stands as a monument of artistic achievement. After the acclaimed recital of The Art of Fugue in 2015, pianist Mr Konstantin Lifschitz is returning to the University of Hong Kong this fall with eight concerts, offering his intelligent and distinctive approach to the complete cycle, a must-hear concert series in 2017-18. The Concert is taking place at the Grand Hall, Lee Shau Kee Lecture Centre, the University of Hong Kong on September 15-24.

“I can’t tell you how honoured and privileged I feel to be sharing this key repertoire not just of piano music but of western civilization as such with you... Since I was a child, I was learning about one sonata every year. Now that I’ve turned 40, I managed to perform all of them separately or as opuses in public. And now this is a huge undertaking of presenting all of them to you.” said Mr Lifschitz.

Apart from the thrill of listening to the well-known pieces, such as the 'Pathétique', 'Moonlight', 'Appassionata' and the most daunting 'Hammerklavier', it will be a rare chance to hear the less frequently performed works in the broader context, completing an insightful journey through an Everest of the piano repertoire.

To accompany the performance of the Beethoven sonata cycle, there will be a series of 'Music in Words' talks in three different languages, providing insight and context to the music. Free admission but separate registration required.

Programme: Concerts

September 15: 20:00: I: 01-04
September 16: 20:00: II: 05-08
September 17: 15:30: III: 09-12
September 17: 20:00: IV: 13-16
September 22: 20:00: V: 17-21
September 23: 20:00: VI: 22-26
September 24: 15:30: VII: 27-29
September 24: 20:00: VIII: 30-32

Music in Words

September 15, 16 and 21, starting at 18:00: Talk I: Mr Yang Zhao: In Putonghua, Talk II: Ms. Nancy Loo: In Cantonese and Talk III: Professor Daniel Chua and Konstantin Lifschitz: In English

For ticketing details,call 2111 5999 or visit URBTIX website.

Konstantin Lifschitz: Konstantin Lifschitz was born in 1976 in Kharkov, Ukraine. By the age of five, he began his studies at the Gnessin Special Music School in Moscow under the tutelage of Tatiana Zelikman. In 1994, he launched his glittering international career with a recording of Bach’s Goldberg Variations. The CD received a Grammy nomination and was praised as the most convincing Bach interpretation since Glenn Gould. In 1995 he won the German Echo Classic Record Prize, as a 'New Young Artist' of the year.

Today, Lifschitz is celebrated for his musical sensibility and nuanced playing. He gives recitals in prestigious venues all over the world and performs with leading orchestras. He is, also, a prolific recording artist, a conductor and a dedicated chamber musician. He is a Fellow of the Royal Academy of Music in London and has been a Professor at Hochschule Luzern in Switzerland since 2008. ω.

Programme Enquiries: Call 3917 8165 or visit the website.

Whatever Your Field of Work and Wherever in the World You are, Please, Make a Choice to Do All You Can to Seek and Demand the End of Death Penalty For It is Your Business What is Done in Your Name. The Law That Makes Humans Take Part in Taking Human Lives and That Permits and Kills Human Lives is No Law. It is the Rule of the Jungle Where Law Does Not Exist. The Humanion

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Classical Concert to Support Future Music Talents of Malaysia: Birmingham Conservatoire Benevolent Fund Concert: July 30

 

|| July 19: 2017: Birmingham City University News || ά. Malaysian graduates from Birmingham Conservatoire are coming together to host a fundraising concert in Petaling Jaya, that will support the next generation of talent to study at the UK music institution. Taking place at Bentley Music Academy on Sunday, July 30, ‘Birmingham Conservatoire Benevolent Fund Concert’ will feature acclaimed Malaysian musicians, including, pianist Bernard Tan, UK-based pianists Jeanette Wong, Birmingham Royal Ballet, Ken Lim and violinist Chin Shi Ling.

Other performers performing at the classical concert will be bass-baritone and choral conductor Mak Chi Hoe, soprano Ho Chi Mei, mezzo-soprano Yi Ling Chaing and soprano Bui Yik Ling, who will all, later this year, take on the roles of Count Almaviva, Susanna, Cherubino and Barbarina respectively, in Kuala Lumpur City Opera's production of Mozart's ‘Le Nozze di Figaro’. Completing the line-up of singers is soprano Rachel Tan, who has regularly headlined DAMA Asia productions in recent years.

Saxophonist Eddy Lim will lead his band Jazz Voyager to provide music in the foyer pre-concert and during the intermission. Meanwhile, the Malaysian performers will be joined by Taiwanese alumni and pianists, Peng I-Hsuan and Liao Pei-Chun, the latter being selected as ‘2009 Young Star of the National Concert Hall’ in her native country.  The new benevolent fund, which can be used towards living expenses and further music training activities, is the idea of pianist and Birmingham Conservatoire alumna, Jeanette Wong, from Kuala Lumpur.

Since 2009, she has worked exclusively for the institution assisting with student recruitment in Malaysia and Singapore and it was through developing relationships with Malaysian students, as well as reflecting on her own experiences, that she saw the necessities of such a fund. She said, “Coming from a humble background, I was faced with huge financial difficulties during my postgraduate year after having exhausted both my parents’ support and a personal student loan from Malaysia following my previous undergraduate studies.

Seeing some of the students from a similar background having to work part time, I wanted to help, so that these talented musicians can spend their time in Birmingham doing what they set out to do all the time instead.

Although, Birmingham Conservatoire offers a range of scholarship opportunities for international undergraduate and postgraduate scholars, I felt more could be done for Malaysian students. I was delighted that a whole host of former students wanted to help me, too and the fund and charity concert came together rather quickly as a result of their passion for Birmingham Conservatoire and Malaysia’s emerging musical talent.”

Part of Birmingham City University, Birmingham Conservatoire is a world class institution providing exceptional training for the musicians, actors, stage managers and performers of the future, being the third highest ranked UK conservatoire for music in the Guardian University Guide 2018. In March 2016, HRH Prince Edward, the Earl of Wessex, became the Conservatoire’s first Royal Patron. Birmingham Conservatoire is preparing to move to a new advanced £57 million home later this year, which will include five public performance spaces.

Since 1998, more than 40 Malaysian students have graduated from Birmingham Conservatoire, with upwards of 90 per cent continuing their career as a musician or teaching at university level. Birmingham Conservatoire alumna Chi Hoe Mak, from Penang in Malaysia, said, ''My time at Birmingham Conservatoire was one of the most wonderful and memorable experiences in my life. It has made a huge impact on my career and opened many doors for me professionally. It was there that I was able to grow and mature independently as a musician in a very supportive environment, which is so important for any young musician.

During my time in the UK as a whole, I have made many lifelong friends and have met some of the most talented and gifted people on this planet! Living abroad changes you and I'm very glad that I chose to come to the UK, which has become my second home.”

Birmingham City University is the UK’s biggest producer of creative professionals outside England’s South East and is the country’s most successful recruiter for art and design in Malaysia and China. Birmingham Conservatoire Benevolent Fund Concert has been supported by both Bentley Music Academy and Pastorale Conservatoire in Kuala Lumpur. ω.

Whatever Your Field of Work and Wherever in the World You are, Please, Make a Choice to Do All You Can to Seek and Demand the End of Death Penalty For It is Your Business What is Done in Your Name. The Law That Makes Humans Take Part in Taking Human Lives and That Permits and Kills Human Lives is No Law. It is the Rule of the Jungle Where Law Does Not Exist. The Humanion

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Here's a Little Honorary Doctoral Degree for You: Mind You This is Not a Giovanni Battista Guadagnini So You Can Not Play It

 

|| July 17: 2017: Birmingham City University News || ά. Ms Tasmin Little, one of the world’s foremost violinists, is to be awarded an honorary degree from Birmingham City University. Ms Little will be handed her Honorary Doctorate by the University’s Chancellor, Sir Lenny Henry on Monday, July  24 in a ceremony at the Symphony Hall alongside students graduating from the Faculty of Arts, Design and Media, which includes Birmingham Conservatoire.

Throughout her career, Ms Little has performed at leading venues across the globe, including, the Carnegie Hall New York, Musikverein Vienna, Het Concertgebouw Amsterdam, Philharmonie Berlin, the Barbican Centre London, Lincoln Centre Washington, The Suntory Hall Tokyo and the Symphony Hall Birmingham among other musical venues of high esteem. Her multi-award winning career encompasses international concerto and recital performances, masterclasses and community outreach work and her discography and performance schedule reflect her wide-ranging repertoire.

In 2012, London-born Ms Little was appointed an Officer of the Order of the British Empire:OBE in the Queen's Diamond Jubilee Birthday Honours List for services to music. Speaking ahead of the ceremony, Ms Tasmin Little said, I’m thrilled and honoured to receive an Honorary Doctorate degree from Birmingham City University. I have so many wonderful associations with the city of Birmingham and the Midlands.

I have played for many years with the CBSO for the marvellous audience at Symphony Hall, as well as, at Birmingham Conservatoire and other concerts in the immediate vicinity, including, my mother’s birthplace, Stratford-upon-Avon. I am looking forward to this exciting day hugely.”

An exclusive recording artist for Chandos, her Elgar Concerto disc was awarded the Critic’s Choice Award at the 2011 Classic BRIT Awards. Further awards include a ‘Gramophone’ Award for Audience Innovation for her musical outreach programme, ‘The Naked Violin’ and a ‘Diapason’ d’Or for her disc of Delius violin sonatas with Piers Lane.

Ms Little offered some words of advice to the Birmingham City University graduates she will address on Monday, “Graduation day is a real milestone for every young person; it is the accolade one cherishes after years of hard but rewarding study. There is a sense of completion, but it is also, the beginning of a hugely exciting time, where one’s whole life is ahead and the possibilities are varied and enticing!

To all those graduates, my piece of advice would be: do what you love most and do best! Do not be afraid to be different and to follow your own path. I congratulate every one of the graduates and wish them all the best in their careers!"

The musician first learned to read music at age six while learning to play a recorder, that her mother had given her. After leaving school she went on to the Guildhall School of Music and Drama, where she obtained a Performance Diploma and won the Gold Medal in the School's annual music competition in 1986. Ms Little plays a 1757 Giovanni Battista Guadagnini violin. ω.

Whatever Your Field of Work and Wherever in the World You are, Please, Make a Choice to Do All You Can to Seek and Demand the End of Death Penalty For It is Your Business What is Done in Your Name. The Law That Makes Humans Take Part in Taking Human Lives and That Permits and Kills Human Lives is No Law. It is the Rule of the Jungle Where Law Does Not Exist. The Humanion

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National Concert Hall Awards €15,000 to Young Musicians: Sarah Brady Wins the Bernadette Greevy Bursary

Image: National Concert Hall Dublin


|| July 14: 2017: National Concert Hall Dublin News || ά. Ms Sarah Brady’s winning performance in the final of the Bernadette Greevy Bursary took place on June 20 at the NCH and was adjudicated by celebrated Irish soprano Ms Celine Byrne and renowned bass-baritone Mr Ian Caddy. Ms Brad enthralled the judges with her vocal prowess and talent in a programme of works by Handel, Mahler and Irish composer Philip Martin.

Last week the National Concert Hall awarded a total of 15,000 euro to joint winners of the 2017 NCH Young Musician’s Award for Strings: Mr Fiachra De hÓra, viola, from Dublin 12 and Mr Callum Owens, cello, Co. Cork, who each receive €5,000 and to soprano Sarah Brady from Co. Westmeath, as winner of the NCH Bernadette Greevy Bursary 2017 worth €5,000. An additional award of €500 was presented by Ms Celine Byrne to Mr Rory Dunne for an outstanding performance of a Mahler song.

Mr Simon Taylor, CEO of the National Concert Hall says, ''It is encouraging to see the wealth of musical talent, that exists in Ireland. We are delighted to support that talent with these awards and to play a part in the future of the next generation of classical musicians. We wish Sarah, Callum and Fiachra the very best in their musical careers and look forward to hearing them perform in the near future.''

Previous winners of this prize include, bass-baritone Mr Padraic Rowan 2016, soprano Ms Roisin Walsh 2015, soprano Ms Jennifer Davis 2013, mezzo-soprano Ms Rachel Kelly 2012, Ms Aoife Miskelly 2011 and baritone Mr Gavan Ring 2010.

Established in 2010 by the NCH and the Department of Arts, Heritage, Regional, Rural and Gaeltacht Affairs, the Bernadette Greevy Bursary is to support and provide performance opportunities for young Irish singers. The prize honours the late Irish mezzo-soprano and opera festival director Dr. Bernadette Greevy.

NCH Young Musician’s Award for String Players 2017: In the second of two announcements the NCH is delighted to award Fiachra De hÓra, viola, age 18 from Dublin 12 and Callum Owens, cello, age 16 from Co. Cork as joint winners of the NCH Young Musician’s Award for String Players 2017. Both winners receive €5,000 each which may be used for to pursue further musical studies or towards an instrument upgrade.

Mr Fiachra performed a unique arrangement by Vadim Borisovsky of Prokofiev’s Introduction to Romeo and Juliet, followed by Vieuxtemp’s Capriccio in C minor for solo viola and the second movement of Franck’s Violin Sonata, arranged for viola putting him in joint first place. Callum performed the first movement of Haydn’s Cello Concerto in C, followed by Valentini’s Cello Sonata, first and second movement, Ravel’s Habanera and Cassado’s Dance of the Green Devil.

Both performances were adjudicated by leader of the RTÉ National Symphony Orchestra Ms Helena Wood and Principal Bass player with the Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra, Mr David Daly. This award, presented every two years, is made possible by the generosity of Ms Anne-Sophie Mutter and the Trondheim Soloists Chamber Orchestra.

These awards form a significant part of the NCH Learning and Participation Programme, which is central to the NCH mission: to ‘foster and celebration the appreciation, knowledge, enjoyment and pure love of music as an integral part of Irish life’.

About Dr Bernadette Greevy: Dr Bernadette Greevy achieved many great honours during her career, including, the Order of Merit of Malta and an Honorary Doctorate of Music, National University of Ireland. She was the Founder and Artistic Director of the Anna Livia Dublin International Opera Festival and further supported student singers through her masterclasses and work as Artist in Residence at the Dublin Institute of Technology. ω.

Whatever Your Field of Work and Wherever in the World You are, Please, Make a Choice to Do All You Can to Seek and Demand the End of Death Penalty For It is Your Business What is Done in Your Name. The Law That Makes Humans Take Part in Taking Human Lives and That Permits and Kills Human Lives is No Law. It is the Rule of the Jungle Where Law Does Not Exist. The Humanion

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Karen Ní Bhroin: A Conductor in Training: What are You to Conduct: Wagner or Mendelssohn: In Dublin: July 07

Image: National Concert Hall

 

|| July 07: 2017: National Concert Hall Dublin News || ά. Ms Karen Ní Bhroin, currently Conductor in Training with the RTÉ Philharmonic Choir, makes her RTÉ National Symphony Orchestra debut in a programme celebrating the delights of summer at its height. Delius paints a wistful portrait of a languid Summer Evening, Mendelssohn’s sparkling A Midsummer Night’s Dream Overture brilliantly conjures a world of make-believe, fantasy and romance and Edward German’s Three Dances from Henry VIII offer a delightfully zesty display of mock-Tudor bravura.

The glowing Prelude to Wagner’s Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg is one of the great and glorious orchestral showpieces. RTE NSO Summer Lunchtime Series takes place on July 07 at 13:05 The event is taking place on Friday, July 14 at 20:00 at the Main Stage of the National Concert Hall, Earlsfort Terrace, Dublin 02, D02 N527. In case you are wondering, Dublin is in, what we call the Irenium but people living there call Ireland, the land encircled by emerald waters and turquoise skies and her green-brown earth is always at an a-trembling-state because she can not quite bring herself to decide which way to look: to the emerald waters or the turquoise skies.

And thus, often she is found counting swans and geese with a lost look in her eyes as if to suggest her thought: I wonder what is there behind and beyond those skies. Well, no wonder why she has been left wondering for no one has ever told her yet that there exist the lands of rainbows, fed by the lakes of swirling lights and there galloping giants of sonar unicorns and seismic optimism of something, called, magic, are always going for luminous walks and how they live there in momentary expositions, that the bubbles become and display in their nano-time-space existence and that they create a special kind of emerald aurora borealis and the souls living there exist by this.

Thus, far, with a little poetry to encourage you to buy the tickets and go and listen out for the legends of those momentary aurora borealis at this concert, conducted by this young Conductor and let us know what has unfolded. And tell the world, particularly, all young women that they can do and be whatever they want to be.

RTÉ National Symphony Orchestra presents Ms Karen Ní Bhroin, conductor, presented by Mr Niall Carroll, RTÉ lyric fm, DELIUS Summer Evening,
Mendelssohn: A Midsummer Night’s Dream Overture : German Henry VIII: Three Dances: Wagner Prelude to Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg. Presented by the RTÉ National Symphony Orchestra.
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Whatever Your Field of Work and Wherever in the World You are, Please, Make a Choice to Do All You Can to Seek and Demand the End of Death Penalty For It is Your Business What is Done in Your Name. The Law That Makes Humans Take Part in Taking Human Lives and That Permits and Kills Human Lives is No Law. It is the Rule of the Jungle Where Law Does Not Exist. The Humanion

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Political Economics of Music: Can I Have One Kilogram of Potatoes One Pint of Milk a Chicken and Three Rainbow Trouts Please: That Would Be Some Pounds: Some Pounds: It's Free on the Internet: They Make Money with What Creators Create But They Would Rather Have the Creators Live on Thin Air



|| July 02: 2017 || ά. PRS for Music hosted an insightful evening of discussion and debate on Thursday, June 29 June with PRS Explores: EU Copyright Reform. Well-known figures from the European Commission and Parliament discussed the copyright reform issues currently at stake in the EU alongside high-profile speakers from the music industry, including PRS for Music Chief Executive, Mr Robert Ashcroft.  The event took a close look at legislative proposals put forward by the European Commission in September 2016. Currently under review by the European institutions, the proposed changes to copyright law could see an impact on the royalties creators receive when their works are used and:or played online.

YouTube and its role in the music industry was at the very heart of the discussion, the debate around the liability of online services, which provide access to creative works remains high on the agenda across the industry. As a membership organisation representing songwriters and composers, PRS for Music continues to be at the forefront of protecting their rights. It has long lobbied the EU institutions for reforms to address the ‘transfer of value’, calling for a solution to the situation which enables platforms that host user-generated content to generate vast revenues without the consent or proper remuneration of creators.

Ms Agata Gerba, who is leading on the copyright brief in the European Commission’s Directorate General for Communications Networks, Content and Technology, opened proceedings with a presentation setting out up the Commission’s proposals as published in September 2016. Songwriter and BASCA Board member Mr Crispin Hunt explained to the audience why copyright reform was so important to artists. He said, “It’s phenomenally personal and phenomenally simple. When you create something, you have an attachment to it and you feel it has some kind of value.

Everything we understand as a civilisation is based on our appreciation of human creativity, from cave paintings to Athens. If we, for the sake of this new technology, which is only in its adolescence, throw away not just the moral wisdom but society’s wisdom, that gives creativity some kind of value for the sake of permanent access, the effect will be huge.”

His thoughts were echoed by UK Music Chairman Mr Andy Heath, who warned, “We could be in for an era of cultural barbarism, the likes of which we have never seen. It would be disastrous for civilisation. I cannot believe that any parliamentarians arguing for, safe harbour, would expect to go into the butchers and get free meat. Where does their intellectual journey go from that position to the one that everything should be free on the internet? It’s asinine and it’s infantile. I am shocked that there is even a debate.”

Ms Mary Honeyball, Labour MEP for London, succinctly explained the two opposing views in European Parliament, “There is a real difference of opinion, and there at least two sides in the debate in European Parliament, which I think some of us found quite surprising, because you wouldn’t necessarily expect copyright issues to generate that kind of interest and that kind of emotion.

People feel very deeply about a lot of it and we’ve had some interesting and heated discussions, which doesn’t often happen in the European Parliament. There are very different points of view, very different principles that people are bringing to it.  There is quite a movement, which is represented, though not led by the Pirate Party, that the internet should be free to everyone, that you shouldn’t charge for anything.

It’s out there, and everyone should be able to take advantage of it, without any payment, without any obligation, without anything. I find that very extraordinary, but it is a deeply held belief for lots of people. The other one is that all communication should be done responsibly and those who are part of the communication process, whichever part of it they are, should have obligations, should have rights and responsibilities, across the whole spectrum, including paying people who partake in that communication in a reasonably fashion.

So it’s two very opposing points of view, which have so far proved quite irreconcilable. The European Parliament, and the whole way that Europe works, is based on consensus and compromise, which people involved in British politics always find quite difficult to understand, as it’s the exact opposite of the way things go on here. So far, we have been unable to come together and work out compromises on the important issues in the Commission’s proposal.”

PRS for Music Chief Executive Mr Robert Ashcroft referred to his paper, ‘Is Copyright Law Fit for Purpose in the Internet Era?’, co-authored with Dr George Barker, to set out the economic argument for adequate remuneration. He noted, “Creative works were fuelling the growth of one actor, causing them to earn money from advertising that was being paid because of the attraction of these creative works but the authors were not getting paid.

The paper proved, as much as an economist can prove anything, that the economy was worse off overall. It was not just that creators were worse off because their creative works were being taken without adequate remuneration; but that the economy as a whole could not, by definition, achieve the maximum rate of growth under those conditions.”

PRS Explores launched last year with the aim of facilitating debate about change in the industry. Previous evenings have covered the relationship between music and videogames, big data, and blockchain. Further events are planned for 2017 and will be announced in due course.

About PRS for Music: PRS for Music represents the rights of over 125,000 songwriters, composers and music publishers in the UK. As a membership organisation it ensures creators are paid whenever their music is played, performed or reproduced, championing the importance of copyright to protect and support the UK music industry. The UK has a proud tradition of creating wonderful music that is enjoyed the world over and PRS for Music has been supporting the creators of that music since 1914. PRS for Music provides business and community groups with easy access to 22.2m songs through its music licences. In an industry worth over £4.1bn PRS for Music is uniquely placed to be a voice for music and music creators. Collecting £621.5m in 2016, PRS for Music is one of the world’s most efficient combined rights organisations. With over 100 representation agreements in place globally, PRS for Music's network represents over two million music creators.
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Whatever Your Field of Work and Wherever in the World You are, Please, Make a Choice to Do All You Can to Seek and Demand the End of Death Penalty For It is Your Business What is Done in Your Name. The Law That Makes Humans Take Part in Taking Human Lives and That Permits and Kills Human Lives is No Law. It is the Rule of the Jungle Where Law Does Not Exist. The Humanion

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Tara Erraught Opera Gala with the RTÉ National Symphony Orchestra in Dublin: July 14

Image: National Concert Hall

 

|| July 02: 2017: National Concert Hall Dublin News || ά. With RTÉ National Symphony Orchestra and Mr Ramon Tebar, conducting, Ms Liz Nolan, RTÉ lyric fm presents Ms Tara Erraught at the Tara Erraught Opera Gala, The event is taking place on Friday, July 14 at 20:00 at the Main Stage of the National Concert Hall, Earlsfort Terrace, Dublin 02, D02 N527. In case you are wondering, Dublin is in, what we call the Irenium but people living there call Ireland, the land encircled by emerald waters and turquoise skies and her green-brown earth is always at an a-trembling-state because she can not quite bring herself to decide which way to look: to the emerald waters or the turquoise skies. And thus, often she is found counting swans and geese with a lost look in her eyes as if to suggest her thought: I wonder what is there behind and beyond those skies.

Well, no wonder why she has been left wondering for no one has ever told her yet that there exist the lands of rainbows, fed by the lakes of swirling lights and there galloping giants of sonar unicorns and seismic optimism of something, called, magic, are always going for luminous walks and how they live there in momentary expositions, that the bubbles become and display in their nano-time-space existence and that they create a special kind of emerald aurora borealis and the souls living there exist by this. Thus, far, with a little poetry to encourage you to buy the tickets and go and listen out for the legends of those momentary aurora borealis at this concert and let us know what has unfolded. 

What are on offer: Meyerbeer Nobles seigneurs, salut, Les Huguenots, Gounod Que fais-tu, blanche tourterelle, Roméo et Juliette, Mozart Deh per questo istante solo, La clemenza di Tito, Mozart Soffre il mio cor con pace, Mitridate, re di Ponto, Bellini Se Romeo t’uccise un figlio, I Capuletti e i Montecchi, Bellini Deh! tu, deh! tu, bell’anima, I Capuletti e i Montecchi, Rossini Assisa a piè d’un salice, Otello, Rossini Ah se é ver, Il barbiere di Siviglia.

Ms Tara Erraught, the mezzo-soprano with ‘that elusive X factor’, makes a welcome return to headline a gala concert of ravishing operatic arias by Mozart and four 19th-century giants. Meyerbeer’s brightly welcoming ‘Nobles seigneurs, slaut’, Les Heugenots, ushers in songs by Gounod and Mozart, the imploring ‘Deh per questo istante solo’ from La clemenza di Tito and a pair of brilliant, bracing arias courtesy of Bellini and Rossini revelling in the coloratura splendour of ‘Se Romeo t’uccise un figlio’, Roméo et Juliette and ‘Ah se é ver’, Il barbiere di Siviglia. Presented by the RTÉ National Symphony Orchestra.
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Whatever Your Field of Work and Wherever in the World You are, Please, Make a Choice to Do All You Can to Seek and Demand the End of Death Penalty For It is Your Business What is Done in Your Name. The Law That Makes Humans Take Part in Taking Human Lives and That Permits and Kills Human Lives is No Law. It is the Rule of the Jungle Where Law Does Not Exist. The Humanion

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Bringing Holocaust Lessons to Life to New Generation Through Suppressed Music

Image: University of Victoria

|| June 05: 2017: University of Victoria News || ά. Two University of Victoria professors, whose efforts to infuse their teaching and research with lessons from the Holocaust are among 10 faculty members and three graduate students, who received top awards last week at the university’s REACH Awards. The awards, which combine existing Teaching Excellence Awards with the Craigdarroch Research Awards into a single event, celebrate the extraordinary teachers and researchers at UVic, who are making an impact in the classroom and beyond.

“The REACH Awards mark a new era of recognition for our university.” says UVic President Mr Jamie Cassels. “By honouring teaching and research together, we acknowledge how they’re inextricably linked for the betterment of our students, our university, our partners, and society at large.” Music scholar Suzanne Snizek is an expert in 'suppressed music', the classical music silenced under the Nazi regime because of the composers’ ideologies, aesthetic or Jewish heritage. Through audio recordings, publications, performances and lectures around the world, she’s part of a global effort to bring these forgotten treasures back to life.

“If it’s a good piece of music, it should be played.” says Ms Snizek, who was delighted when one of her music students picked two suppressed pieces for her end-of-year recital. “One of the challenges for this music is that it gets ghettoised again as ‘suppressed music.’ So I’m trying to present it on its own terms and include it in my teaching here so students can encounter this music for themselves.”

Ms Helga Thorson leads UVic’s I-Witness Holocaust Field School, an intensive semester of lectures, including some by Holocaust survivors, presentations and travel to Central European Holocaust memorials. The field school has dramatically influenced the lives and career choices of many students who take the course, says Thorson.

“The combination of a scholarly way of looking at things and the students’ emotional reactions to the memorials, something about that awakens something much more in them than would classroom learning alone.” she says. “It leads them to a point of deep learning and often becomes transformational in both their personal and professional lives.”
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Whatever Your Field of Work and Wherever in the World You are, Please, Make a Choice to Do All You Can to Seek and Demand the End of Death Penalty For It is Your Business What is Done in Your Name. The Law That Makes Humans Take Part in Taking Human Lives and That Permits and Kills Human Lives is No Law. It is the Rule of the Jungle Where Law Does Not Exist. The Humanion

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The Norse Days Music Festival 2017 at the Southbank Centre: September 28-October 01

Kuva: Heikki Tuuli


|| May 24: 2017 || ά. The contemporary classical festival Norse Music Days will land on UK shores and take over Southbank Centre for the very first time this September. The Nordic spectacular showcases pioneering contemporary compositions by Nordic composers and sound artists, performed by some of the UK’s most exciting ensembles and soloists, alongside a wide-ranging programme of talks, workshops and family events. Almost all performances and events are free to attend. The Norse Days are September 28-October 01.

The globally renowned contemporary classical music festival Norse Music Days celebrates new Nordic music and was founded in 1888 to promote musical collaboration between the Nordic countries. Held annually in one of the Nordic capitals, Nordic Music Days will make its UK debut this year as part of Nordic Matters, Southbank Centre’s year-long exploration of arts and culture from across the Nordic regions. The festival introduces UK audiences to the best contemporary Nordic music, encourages collaboration between Nordic and UK musicians and composers and provides a platform for experimentation through a series of workshops and performances.

The festival will see the return of The Virtual Orchestra: Sibelius 360, the acclaimed 360 degree virtual reality experience that places viewers at the heart of the Philharmonia Orchestra on the Royal Festival Hall stage.

Highlights include Esa-Pekka Salonen conducting the Philharmonia Orchestra, performing Sibelius’ 6th and 7th Symphonies alongside works by contemporary Icelandic composers Anna Thorvaldsdottir and Daníel Bjarnason, September 28.  A collision of cutting-edge electronica and visuals with traditional Nordic influences at Late Night Nordic Sounds, featuring performances from Swedish artists TMRW and Gidge, with visuals by Annie Tådne, September 20

The Riot Ensemble presenting a concert of works by five Nordic contemporary composers including Kaija Saariaho from Finland, Djuro Zivkovic and Ole Lützow-Holm from Sweden, Bára Gísladóttir from Iceland and Ruben Sverre Gjertsen from Norway. Manchester’s acclaimed ensemble Distractfold presenting a concert inspired by Nordic forests, using non-traditional instruments such as transducers and solenoids.

One of the world’s leading vocal ensembles for new music, Exaudi, performing joiks, the traditional folk songs of the Sami people, as well as a Joik Big Sing where visitors can get involved. Finnish musicians Pekka Kuusisto and Ilona Korhonen presenting a concert inspired by traditional Finnish music including runosong, the oldest known Fenno-Baltic singing style, September 28. A large-scale musical sculpture inspired by the colours and movement of the Northern lights, by British artist Paul Jefferies.

About Southbank Centre: Southbank Centre is the UK’s largest arts centre, occupying a 21­ acre site that sits in the midst of London’s most vibrant cultural quarter on the South Bank of the Thames. The site has an extraordinary creative and architectural history stretching back to the 1951 Festival of Britain. Southbank Centre is home to the Royal Festival Hall, Queen Elizabeth Hall, Purcell Room and Hayward Gallery as well as The Poetry Library and the Arts Council Collection.

Nordic Music Days: The Nordic Music Days premiered in 1888 and is one of the world's oldest music festivals. Previously the festival has alternated between the Nordic capitals, but this year it is hosted by Southbank Centre in London. The festival is a part of Southbank Centre's year-long exploration of Nordic arts and culture Nordic Matters. The Nordic Music Days festival is presented by the Society of Swedish Composers and the Council of Nordic Composers, supported by the Nordic Cultural Fund, this year in cooperation with Southbank Centre, and the Swedish music organisation Musik i Syd and the festival Svensk Musikvår.

Nordic Matters: Nordic Matters is a year-long exploration of Nordic arts and culture in 2017 at London's Southbank Centre, featuring music, dance, theatre, visual arts, participation, talks and debates, and gastronomy. Chosen from a number of international applicants, Southbank Centre is the sole recipient of a grant from The Nordic Council of Ministers for a new festival celebrating the very best of Nordic art and culture throughout 2017 – one of the biggest cultural-political partnerships of its kind. ω.

Whatever Your Field of Work and Wherever in the World You are, Please, Make a Choice to Do All You Can to Seek and Demand the End of Death Penalty For It is Your Business What is Done in Your Name. The Law That Makes Humans Take Part in Taking Human Lives and That Permits and Kills Human Lives is No Law. It is the Rule of the Jungle Where Law Does Not Exist. The Humanion

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UnampliFire Festival 2017 in Deptford: May 27

Image: University of Kent
 

|| May 13: 2017 || ά. This summer, BBC award-winning promoters the Nest Collective, operating in and around London, will present the third edition UnampliFire Festival 2017, taking place on May 27, as well as a host of weekly Campfire Clubs in unique green spaces, parks, community gardens, backyards and urban nature reserves around London, May-October.

The Nest Collective seeks to discover the latest music to emerge onto the folk, world and acoustic scene, acting as London’s hub for new music in established and unusual venues. They are pioneers in matching exciting line-ups with a varied audience of all ages; those familiar with and those completely new to the genre. Now in its third edition, UnampliFire Festival will be returning to the 17th century Master Shipwrights Palace in Deptford, on the banks of the River Thames, on Saturday.

Music from across the globe will be performed throughout the house’s grand rooms, riverside boathouse and around the campfire. Bringing together some of the finest artists in folk, roots and acoustic music from the UK and beyond for one day.

The festival promises to be an experience for folk-lovers and novices alike. Previous performers include
Martin Carthy, Green Gartside, Cosmo Sheldrake and Seckou Keita. With no amplification, no sound checks, no waiting for bands to plug in, UnampliFire celebrates pure continuous music over multiple areas and stages, bringing a historic home to life and allowing audiences a sense of being part of the music.

Festival Line Up include Dizraeli, Kefaya, Piers Faccini, Kit Downes, Marry Waterson and David A Jaycock, Nadine Khouri, August and After, Nina Harries, The Medlars, James Riley, Owl Parliament. ω.

Whatever Your Field of Work and Wherever in the World You are, Please, Make a Choice to Do All You Can to Seek and Demand the End of Death Penalty For It is Your Business What is Done in Your Name. The Law That Makes Humans Take Part in Taking Human Lives and That Permits and Kills Human Lives is No Law. It is the Rule of the Jungle Where Law Does Not Exist. The Humanion

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Sara Lee Wins the Graduation Gala with a Compelling Rendition of Tchaikovsky

Image: University of Auckland

|| May 09: 2017: University of Auckland New Zealand News || ά. An ‘assured and compelling’ rendition of Tchaikovsky by pianist Ms Sara Lee, has won the University of Auckland student first prize and $6,000, at the annual Graduation Gala Concerto Competition. The South Korean-born undergraduate from the School of Music delighted a packed crowd at the Auckland Town Hall with her performance of the first movement from Tchaikovsky’s much loved Piano Concerto in B flat minor.

The Auckland-based musician, who is in her second year of a Bachelor of Music degree, has been playing the piano since she was six years old. Viola player Ms Julia Park won second prize of $4,000 plus the development prize of a further $2,000. Third prize of $3,000 was awarded to violinist Ms Joella Pinto. The annual competition, now in its tenth year, celebrates Autumn Graduation Week at the University. The winner was chosen by a judging panel, consisting of Associate Professor Helene Pohl, New Zealand School of Music, Victoria University of Wellington, Professor Terence Dennis, Co-ordinator of Classical Music Performance, University of Otago and Associate Professor Martin Rummel, Head of the School of Music, University of Auckland.

Ms Sara Lee, who is being taught by Associate Professor Rae de Lisle at the School of Music, has previously studied at the Tchaikovsky Music School and Conservatory in Moscow.

She has been a prize winner in many international competitions and scholarships including the USA Cincinnati World Piano Competition, Grand Prize, Citta di Barletta in Italy, First Prize, Saint Petersburg Piano Competition, First Prize, Austria International Chopin Piano Competition, Second Prize and Best Performance Prize, Rutgers University Scholarship, Brevard Festival Scholarship and the Busoni International Competition.

“This year’s Graduation Gala Concerto Competition marked the 10th anniversary of this glorious annual celebration of the talent of the School of Music students, with three soloists delivering outstanding performances, accompanied by the School of Music Symphony Orchestra.” says Associate Professor Martin Rummel, Head of the School of Music.

For students and staff alike, sharing this celebration with the audience at a full Town Hall marked a highlight of the academic year.” Ms Lee, who has performed all over the world, was recently selected as Accademia Pianistca Siciliana Artist and embarked on an extensive concert tour of Italy.
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Whatever Your Field of Work and Wherever in the World You are, Please, Make a Choice to Do All You Can to Seek and Demand the End of Death Penalty For It is Your Business What is Done in Your Name. The Law That Makes Humans Take Part in Taking Human Lives and That Permits and Kills Human Lives is No Law. It is the Rule of the Jungle Where Law Does Not Exist. The Humanion

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Not Everyday You Celebrate the 10th Anniversary: Where are the Musicians and the Orchestra: May 04

Graduation Gala Concerto Competition finalists Joella Pinto, Sara Lee and Julie Park. Image: University of Auckland

 

|| April 09: 2017: University of Auckland New Zealand News || ά. The University of Auckland has found its three finalists in the Graduation Gala Concerto Competition 2017. And they are Sara Lee, piano, Julie Park, viola and Joella Pinto, violin, all performance students from the School of Music. This year is the 10th anniversary of the popular free concert, held at the Town Hall, which marks the end of May Graduation at the University of Auckland. The three finalists were selected from 21 musicians, following two preliminary rounds of competition held over two days. For the upcoming concert and final round, each of the three outstanding musicians will perform in front of an audience of more than 1500 people in a bid to win the first prize of $6,000 as well as the chance to advance their solo careers.

 The total prize pool this year is $15,000, with second place receiving $4,000 and third $3,000. There is, also, an additional development prize of $2,000. Each finalist will play movements from a concerto, accompanied by the University of Auckland Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Professor Uwe Grodd. Sara Lee will perform the first movement from Tchaikovsky’s much loved first Piano Concerto in B flat minor, Julie Park the outer movements from the Concerto for Viola and Orchestra in G minor by Cecil Forsyth and Joella Pinto will play the first movement of the Violin Concerto in D major, Op. 35 by Tchaikovsky.

The winner will be chosen by a judging panel, consisting of Associate Professor Helene Pohl, New Zealand School of Music, Victoria University of Wellington; Professor Terence Dennis, Co-ordinator of Classical Music Performance, University of Otago and Associate Professor Martin Rummel, Head of School of Music, University of Auckland.

A special feature of this year’s concert will the opening performance by the University of Auckland Massed Choir, directed by Associate Professor Karen Grylls, of Tempus est Iocundum from Carmina Burana by Carl Orff.

“The Graduation Gala Concerto Competition showcases some of the School of Music’s most talented performers and provides an opportunity for them to gain experience as soloists.” says Associate Professor Martin Rummel, Head of the School of Music.

“The concert is not only a highlight for the Auckland community, but also within the academic life of the University of Auckland. I am happy that the School of Music has been able to make such a significant contribution to the graduation festivities for ten years now and look forward to many more to come.”

The University of Auckland 10th Anniversary Graduation Gala Concerto Competition will be held on Thursday, May 04 at the Auckland Town Hall, 303 Queen Street, Auckland Central, at 19:30. Admission is free; patrons are strongly advised to arrive early to be assured of admission.

For further visit the Graduation Gala Website. ω.

Whatever Your Field of Work and Wherever in the World You are, Please, Make a Choice to Do All You Can to Seek and Demand the End of Death Penalty For It is Your Business What is Done in Your Name. The Law That Makes Humans Take Part in Taking Human Lives and That Permits and Kills Human Lives is No Law. It is the Rule of the Jungle Where Law Does Not Exist. The Humanion

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The God That Created All Cannot Do So Unless Godself is Love for Creation is an Act of Love: Hear O Israel How Human Souls Bleed Across the Earth Yet They Won't See, Seek, Choose and Strive Towards the Light of Love and Humanity: Pure Land Series Presents Nick Strimple and Singing in the Lion’s Mouth: Music and the Holocaust: 1933-2016 at the China Exchange: May 04



|| April 06: 2017 || ά. As means of expressing extreme sorrow and emotions, music, poetry and the arts at large played an important role in the Jewish ghettos and concentration camps of World War II. Singing in the Lion’s Mouth focuses on the idea and history of music as an agent of hope in the concentration camps and eastern European ghettos during World War II. Nick Strimple will discuss the music and lead a group of musicians in a moving piece about the hopes and fears of those, who endured the horrors of the Shoah. The Nazis appointed Jewish councils, known as Judenräte, to serve as self-enforcing intermediaries between the Nazi government and the Jewish communities of the ghettos and music performances in the ghettos were then sometimes censored and controlled, making music playing a symbol of freedom.

Pure Land Series Presents Nick Strimple and Singing in the Lion’s Mouth: Music and the Holocaust: 1933-2016 at the China Exchange: May 04. Tickets are available purelandseries.com. Pure Land Series at China Exchange UK, 32A Gerrard Street, London W1D 6JA. Doors open at 18:00, event starts at 18:30 and lasts until 19:45. Although not Jewish himself, Nick Strimple was appointed in 1985 by the Czech government to extensively research music of the Holocaust, which then led him to continue on that path, in order to remind people that not only had the Jewish genocide happened, new forms of genocides were taking place today around the world. This is the first time in several decades that Nick Strimple will perform in London.

In the concentration camps, where instruments were not accessible, poignant musical pieces were still composed in secret and choral ensembles were set up, a moving testimony to the power of creativity and human optimism. In a morbid display of cruelty, the Nazis had captive Jewish musicians set up orchestras in the camps to play as the other inmates were sent to work or when new convoys of prisoners arrived to the camp and were sorted between those, fit for labour and those, who were to be sent to the gas chambers. Music was, thus, both a means of controlling prisoners and a way of deceiving new arrivals into thinking the situation was not as dire as it seemed and therefore, avoiding potential panic and uprising. Auschwitz-Birkenau alone had six different orchestras, one of which composed of no less than a hundred musicians.

An astonishing corpus of musical pieces, poems, drawings and paintings were produced by Jewish prisoners during and after the war, one of the most famous piece being Max Helfman’s Die Naye Hagode, Yiddish for ‘The New Haggadah’, i.e. the story of the Jewish Exodus from Egypt, a cantata about the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising.

However, most of the music and songs that were sung or composed in the camps were not religious but rather dealing with homesickness, prisoners from all around Europe were sent to the camps, patriotism and even partisan ideologies. Some of the inmates sent to the gas chambers, moments before realising the fate that awaited them, sang the Shema Yisrael, Hear, O Israel, the Jewish declaration of faith and the last prayer a Jew is supposed to utter before dying or Ani Ma’amin, I Believe, the thirteen principles of the Jewish faith.

Dr. Strimple is internationally recognised for his work with music related to the Holocaust and has lectured extensively at a number of prestigious universities, including Oxford, Cambridge and Yale and at the Simon Wiesenthal Centre for Holocaust Studies. The author of two critically acclaimed books on choral music, Strimple, also, served as a consultant to several museums and has conducted some of the world’s leading ensembles, such as the London Symphony Orchestra and the Philharmonia Orchestra.

The Pure Land Series at China Exchange invites inspirational speakers and like-minded people to share their visions of a world grounded in compassion, empowerment, spirituality and creativity. The series is hosted by the Pure Land Foundation, supporting charitable endeavours to promote social, spiritual and emotional wellness. Further, it aims to enrich lives through art and music.
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Whatever Your Field of Work and Wherever in the World You are, Please, Make a Choice to Do All You Can to Seek and Demand the End of Death Penalty For It is Your Business What is Done in Your Name. The Law That Makes Humans Take Part in Taking Human Lives and That Permits and Kills Human Lives is No Law. It is the Rule of the Jungle Where Law Does Not Exist. The Humanion

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Jacky Naylor Wins the Jazz Composition Award

Image: Birmingham City University


|| April 04: 2017: Birmingham City University News || ά. A recent graduate from Birmingham Conservatoire is celebrating being named the winner of a national music competition. Jazz pianist Jacky Naylor, who gained a first class honours degree from Birmingham Conservatoire, part of Birmingham City University, has been awarded the Dankworth Prize for Jazz Composition in the big band category for his work ‘Bilbao’.

The Dankworth Prize for Jazz Composition, established by businessman Art Mead in 2007, is run by the Musicians’ Company and sponsored by the Wavendon Foundation. The competition offers two prizes for original jazz compositions, with £1,000 being awarded to both the best composition for big band and small ensemble.  Previous winners of the award include Jazz FM Awards-nominated trumpeter Laura Jurd and trombonist Tom Green.

This year’s ceremony took place in London on Thursday, March 23 where the awards were presented by Jacqui and Emily Dankworth, daughter and granddaughter of the late jazz composer, Sir John Dankworth. The winners’ compositions were played at a concert in Milton Court by members of the Guildhall Big Band, directed by Scott Stroman. Jeremy Price has been Head of Jazz at Birmingham Conservatoire since the Jazz Department was established in 1999.

He said, Composition and arranging for big band is really strong here at Birmingham Conservatoire under the directorship of Hans Koller. All jazz students are composers, with opportunity to trial their work in our Composers’ Jazz Orchestra, so it’s all kept very live and integral with our improvising scene. I think this is why we have produced so many good writers in jazz, including Jacky Naylor.

Other notable alumni writers are Dave Ferris, Sean Gibbs, Alcyona Mick and Ed Puddick. We support our own composition and arranging prize and the students get access to high level masterclasses from people like Mike Gibbs, Maria Schneider and Stan Sulzmann.”

Skipton-born Jacky Naylor has recently released his debut big band album ‘Rough Boundaries’, which features Birmingham Jazz Orchestra. It comprises of five compositions in which he captures the essence of his visits to five contrasting cities, Bilbao, Marrakech, Moscow, Reykjavik and Stockholm.

Aside from his passion for big band, the Birmingham-based musician leads his own trio featuring Percy Pursglove, bass and Nathan England-Jones, drums, which showcases his original music.

As Jacky’s former composition Tutor, Hans Koller, Senior Lecturer in Jazz, Birmingham Conservatoire, added, “Jacky is without doubt one of the most gifted composers and arrangers of his generation. He has a wonderful way of combining tradition with innovation, intuition with intellect, and groove with lyricism.”
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Compose That What No One Has Ever Done: New Woman-Composers Development Programme

Four promising woman composers Elizabeth Younan, Clare Johnston, Ella Macens and Natalie Nicolas are part of the first national development programme
set up by The Con. Image: Original: Mandy Campbell
 

|| March 18: 2017: University of Sydney News || ά. Four emerging composers, Natalie Nicolas, Elizabeth Younan, Clare Johnston and Ella Macens, have been chosen to take part in a two-year development programme at the University of Sydney’s Music Faculty. The inaugural programme will see them mentored by renowned woman composers and write for leading Australian ensembles and musicians. Professor Matthew Hindson AM, a well noted Australian Composer and the Conservatorium of Muci’s Head of School and Associate Dean of Learning and Teaching, Acting, said, “In recent years we have been pleased to see an increasing number of female students enrolling in composition. They now make up around 44 per cent of our current composition undergraduates. However, our interests are to see these more women advance to compose at the top of their music profession.

As part of the specially tailored programme, the women will be nurtured by successful composers, including Professor Anne Boyd AM and Dr Maria Grenfell. They will write new works for four different performing arts organisations and artists, namely, the Tasmanian Symphony Orchestra, Sydney Philharmonia Choirs, Goldner String Quartet and Claire Edwardes, a percussion soloist, chamber musician and Artistic Director of Ensemble Offspring and Con alumna. At the end of the two years, each ensemble will, also, pick one composer to commission a new work for a public performance. “The capacity to become a prominent composer typically happens through workshops, performance of new works and working with highly skilled mentors. The Con is well placed to set up these opportunities with access to one of the biggest composition departments in the country and many of Australia’s finest composers on staff.” said Professor Hindson.

The four composers in the new programme were picked from a pool of applicants received from across Australia. To be considered, they must have a music degree and are pursuing postgraduate music studies. The successful participants were chosen for their academic and professional achievements so far.

Clare Johnston, a graduate of the University of Melbourne, joins University of Sydney graduates Natalie Nicolas, Elizabeth Younan and Ella Macens in the inaugural programme. The women are all recognised for their top academic achievements and music awards and have already had music performed publicly by ensembles and artists in Australia and overseas.

Natalie Nicolas says that the chance to work and write for leading ensembles is just too good an opportunity. “Working with professional musicians is one of the most valuable experiences for a composer. When I worked with the Australian String Quartet three years ago, I learnt more in one week than I ever imagined. I hope to improve insurmountably as a writer and come out with some solid industry relationships with like-minded people.” she said.

National Woman Composers Development Programme: Commencing in 2016, the Sydney Conservatorium of Music:SCM, in collaboration with four of Australia’s top performing ensembles and artists, will be offering a programme aimed at developing Women in Composition. Incoming Master of Music Composition or Doctor of Musical Arts students at the SCM can incorporate this programme as part of their degree. Participants will be involved in writing music for four diverse professional groups and artists and having their music work-shopped and:or performed at the highest level.

The music will be written for each group or artist in both 2016 and 2017, building skills from one year to the next. These compositions will form part or all of the participants’ portfolio for their Master of Music or Doctoral degree. In 2018, each of the ensembles will select one of the participating composers, and commission from them a new work for future performance. Students will, also, receive mentorship in administrative and production skills throughout the course of this programme, complementing their artistic development.

Participants will be mentored by several of Australia’s top woman composers, as well as by members of the Sydney Conservatorium of Music’s outstanding composition unit. Participants will be working with the Tasmanian Symphony Orchestra, Sydney Philharmonia Choirs, Goldner String Quartet and percussionist Claire Edwardes in 2016 and 2017. This programme is supported by Musica Viva Australia.

For further information contact: Damien Ricketson, Chair of Composition and Music Technology: damien.ricketson at sydney.edu.au. Professor Matthew Hindson, Head of School: matthew.hindson at sydney.edu.au. ω.

Some student musicians

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The Saddest and Most Tragic Form of Human Existence is When a Human Soul Burns in Hatred Into Ashes and Wastes the Only Opportunity for It to Create, Become, Give and Live Love's Infinity: Love Music Hate Racism: March 18

Image: Care for Calais


|| March 15: 2017 || ά.  Some of Britain’s top musicians and bands are throwing their weight behind the re-launch of Love Music Hate Racism. Drawing inspiration from Rock Against Racism stalwarts The Clash, Steel Pulse, Tom Robinson band and Misty in Roots, popular artists including Stormzy, Charli XCX, Lianne La Havas, Coldplay, Kwabs and Ed Sheeran have shown their commitment to anti-racism by posing in the '‘Love Music Hate Racism’ t-shirts. They will send a clear message to their millions of fans, that music has the power to bring people together.

Care4Calais works to support refugees across UK and France. As the movement 'Love Music, Hate Racism being re-launched, artists declare their support for the campaign posing with a T-shirt created specially for the occasion. The l t-shirt is available to buy online. For the sale of each T-shirt, Care4Calais will receive £01, that will be destined to help refugees. And let this event act as a point of not just protesting but generating the empathy and humanity that the world's desperate humanity needs from the rest of humanity. The ‘Love Music Hate Racism’ campaign is supporting the planned United Nations Anti-Racism Day events, in London and around the world, on Saturday, March 18.

Zak Cochrane, campaigner at ‘Love Music, Hate Racism’ says, “There is a proud history of musicians standing up to racism from the likes of Steel Pulse and The Clash performing at Rock Against Racism gigs in the 70s to bands such as The Libertines and Roll Deep playing at Love Music Hate Racism events in the early 2000s.”

LMHR and RAR weren’t just about big bands and big concerts though. They were about musicians and fans uniting in a grass roots movement. We are delighted that these artists are working with us to bring this campaign to life. I hope it will inspire millions of people once more to put on their own gigs and spread the message far and wide that racism only seeks to divide communities, whereas music brings us together. It is in all our interest to love music and hate racism.”

‘Love Music Hate Racism’ is the continuation of the ‘Rock Against Racism’ movement of the late 1970s, which used music to unite people and promote anti-racism. ‘Love Music, Hate Racism’ uses the energy of the music scene to celebrate diversity and involve people in anti-racist activity.

Since its founding in 2002, it has produced many hundreds of events, from large outdoor festivals to local gigs and club nights. It has been instrumental in discouraging support for far-right groups. To support UN Anti-Racism Day, demonstrations will, also, be taking place in Glasgow, Cardiff, Amsterdam, Athens, Paris, Berlin, Vienna, Copenhagen and Warsaw on Saturday, March 18. ω.

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The Becoming of the Sibelius Academy: Kaarlo Hildén Appointed as the Dean: Please, Do Not Look for the Eight Symphony: Seek to Compose Your Ninth: Johan Julius Christian Sibelius

Image: Wilma Hurskainen:University of the Arts Helsinki

|| March 12: 2017: University of the Arts Helsinki Sibelius Academy News || ά. Mr Kaarlo Hildén, Master of Music, was selected as the Dean of University of the Arts Helsinki’s Sibelius Academy. Mr Hildén has been the Dean of the Faculty of Classical Music at the Sibelius Academy since 2010, and has a long experience in management and development of higher education in the field of music. ''The Sibelius Academy is a Finnish success story. As the Director, my duty is to create the conditions needed for students and teachers to succeed in their work and to make sure this success story has longevity. We still have a lot of untapped potential, that we can use as the basis for the future of the entire Uniarts Helsinki, as well as that of the Sibelius Academy.''

From 2007 to 2010, Mr Hildén was the Programme Director of Hanasaari Swedish–Finnish Cultural Centre. Prior to that, he worked as the Music Education Director of Helsinki Polytechnic Stadia for seven years. Mr Hildén has worked as a Lecturer in practical accompaniment at the Helsinki Conservatory of Music and as a piano and music theory teacher at the Sibelius Academy. He graduated as Master of Music from the Sibelius Academy in 1997. Mr Hildén has, also, served as an expert for evaluation of higher education and as an international advisor in the field of music education. The Dean is the Director of the Sibelius Academy’s operations within Uniarts Helsinki.

His responsibilities focus on the management of academic, artistic and pedagogic operations of the Sibelius Academy. The Deans of the three academies of Uniarts Helsinki, Academy of Fine Arts, Sibelius Academy and Theatre Academy, are members of the university’s executive group. ''Kaarlo Hildén has excellent qualifications for developing the Sibelius Academy’s diverse education in music. As the Dean, his strong management skills and experience will also contribute to the joint development of Uniarts Helsinki.'' says Uniarts Helsinki’s Rector Jari Perkiömäki.

Mr Perkiömäki was the Chair of the committee in charge of the recruitment process. The Uniarts Helsinki Board made the decision on the appointment in its meeting on Thursday, February 02. Mr Hildén has began his as the Dean from the beginning of March.

The Sibelius Academy, the cornerstone of Finnish music, has long traditions. Established in 1882, the cradle of classical music education has added other genres to its palette: Jazz and Folk Music have been taught since the early 1980s and Music Technology since the early 1990s. The driving force for everyone at the Academy is the unquestionable love they have for music, and for the work that they do. Today Sibelius Academy is a creative community of 1,500 students and more than 1,000 staff. It is one of the biggest music academies in Europe and internationally renowned and recognised.

The mission of the Sibelius Academy is to foster and renew musical culture. The mission is accomplished through three modes of activity: teaching, research, and art. In addition to the Bachelor’s and Master’s of Music degrees, you can complete a Licentiate degree and a Doctoral degree at the Academy. The Academy also has a youth department, Junior Academy and a department for adult education and training.

Public concerts are a display of art at the Academy. The 600 annual events form the majority of concerts in the Helsinki Metropolitan Region. In addition to Helsinki, Sibelius Academy has departments in Kuopio and Seinäjoki. The Sibelius Academy Library, a specialist music library, is located in the Helsinki Music Centre and welcomes all visitors.


Helsinki Music Institute, 1882: Sibelius Academy is the only music university in Finland and the biggest of its kind in Scandinavia. It was founded as the Helsinki Music Institute in 1882 on a private initiative. Martin Wegelius was appointed as the first director, and he led the Institute until his death in 1906. Wegelius thought that musicians should educate themselves broadly. He himself taught theoretical subjects, music history, and solfége. Due to a lack of suitable study material, he also wrote some textbooks himself. Wegelius emphasized the teaching of composition and, by doing that, he managed to create a new generation of composers in Finland.

Jean Sibelius and His Contemporaries: One of the students of the Institute was Jean Sibelius, who became the Institute's nominal and symbolical figurehead. Sibelius studied composition and violin there from 1885 to 1889. For a short period in the 1890s, he also taught music theory and, later, composition. The directors who followed Wegelius were Armas Järnefelt, 1906–1907 and Karl Ekman, 1907–1911. In 1911, Erkki Melartin started as a director and began immediately expanding the Institute to make it a conservatory. After the expansion in 1924, the name of the Institute was changed to the Helsinki Conservatory. Two years later, a Department of Military Music was founded.

Sibelius Academy, 1939: After Melartin, Ernst Linko, 1936–1959, began his term, during which the name Sibelius Academy was adopted, 1939. New departments were also created: the Department of Church Music was founded in 1951 and the Department of School Music in 1975. During Taneli Kuusisto's term as the rector, 1959–1971, the Academy became an institute educating professional musicians only. The Academy was solely responsible for educating school, church, and military musicians.

Sibelius Academy Becomes a Public Body: Financial problems eased in 1966 when a bill for state support was passed and the Finnish government took over most of the Academy's expenses. Sibelius Academy became a public body in 1980 and a university in 1998. While Veikko Helasvuo was the rector (1971–1981), a degree renewal was carried out and the Academy adopted a new degree system. Under this new system, the degrees given out by the Academy were equal to other Finnish university degrees.

In 1983, Sibelius Academy expanded into Kuopio when the Kuopio Unit, known as the Kuopio Department today, was founded. Helasvuo's successors were Ellen Urho, 1981–1987, Tuomas Haapanen, 1987–1990, Erkki Rautio, 1990–1993, Lassi Rajamaa, 1993–1999, Pekka Vapaavuori, 1999–2004 and Gustav Djupsjöbacka, 2004–2012. The current rector of Sibelius Academy is Tuomas Auvinen, since 2012.
Helsinki Music Centre, 2011

The Helsinki Music Centre is a long-time dream come true. The idea to build the Centre came from Sibelius Academy in 1992. The two other main actors in the Centre, Helsinki Philharmonic Orchestra and Radio Symphony Orchestra, joined the project in 1994. The new facilities are used for teaching music technology, jazz, music education, orchestral instruments, folk music, composition, and music theory. The smaller Sibelius Academy concert halls are a special source of joy, mainly Black Box, Camerata, Organo, and Sonore, in addition to the auditorium and studio facilities.

The Helsinki Music Centre's International Architecture Competition was won by a Turku based LPR-arkkitehdit architecture agency with their design, 'a mezza voce'. The concert hall acoustics were designed by Yasuhisa Toyota from Nagata Acoustics Inc. The design and construction of the Helsinki Music Centre took 20 years. The Centre is 38,600 gross square metres and 250,000 m³. The main constructor was SRV. The Centre cost 189 million Euros with equipment.

Keywords for the Music Centre are openness, encounters, and interaction. New audiences, old listeners, students, and music professionals and various genres meet each other in the Centre's concert halls and other facilities. According to its vision, the Music Centre strives to be a pioneer in live music performances, create an active and modern city image for the Helsinki Metropolitan Area, and increase its attractiveness in Finland and abroad.
University of the Arts Helsinki 2013

The Finnish Academy of Fine Arts, Sibelius Academy and Theatre Academy Helsinki merged at the beginning of 2013 into an arts university, in English called the University of the Arts Helsinki, Taideyliopisto in Finnish, Konstuniversitetet in Swedish. ω.

Whatever Your Field of Work and Wherever in the World You are, Please, Make a Choice to Do All You Can to Seek and Demand the End of Death Penalty For It is Your Business What is Done in Your Name. The Law That Makes Humans Take Part in Taking Human Lives and That Permits and Kills Human Lives is No Law. It is the Rule of the Jungle Where Law Does Not Exist. The Humanion

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University of Kent Chorus and Symphony Orchestra Colyer-Fergusson Cathedral Concert: March 25

Image: University of Kent


|| March 07: 2017: University of Kent News || ά. Hear Tchaikovsky’s great pioneering symphony Pathétique, Puccini's Messa di Gloria with soloists Shaun Dixon and David Stout. University of Kent Chorus and Symphony Orchestra present: Tchaikovsky: Symphony in B minor, Opus 74, Pathétique; Puccini: Messa di Gloria with Susan Wanless, conducting and Shaun Dixon, tenor and David Stout, baritone. When: March 25, 19:30-21:3. Where: the Canterbury Cathedral. And? That you go....

Come and experience one of the great pioneering symphonies of the nineteenth century. Tchaikovsky described it as 'the best thing I ever composed or shall compose' and its innovative structure would influence composers such as Mahler, Shostakovich and Sibelius.  The Symphony certainly lives up to its original Russian nickname Patetitčeskaja, meaning ‘passionate’ and runs the whole gamut of emotions, famously ending with an unexpected and devastating Adagio lamentoso.

By contrast, the University Chorus will then be joined by two star soloists from the world of opera for a performance of Puccini’s Messa di Gloria, a gloriously energetic and charming work, full of lovely lyrical passages, rousing tunes and fiendish fugues!.

Tickets are available online or from the Gulbenkian Booking Office

Open to Public: Ticket Price: £22, £18, £14, £10, £08: Contact: Dan Harding d.harding at kent.ac.uk. ω.

Whatever Your Field of Work and Wherever in the World You are, Please, Make a Choice to Do All You Can to Seek and Demand the End of Death Penalty For It is Your Business What is Done in Your Name. The Law That Makes Humans Take Part in Taking Human Lives and That Permits and Kills Human Lives is No Law. It is the Rule of the Jungle Where Law Does Not Exist. The Humanion

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One Hymn From One Humanity of One World for One God: Sung Across the Globe

Image: University of Winchester


|| March 04: 2017: University of Winchester News || ά. A hymn written by the Reverend Professor June Boyce-Tillman MBE of the University of Winchester was sung in churches of all denominations all over the world on Friday, March 03 for the Women's World Day of Prayer. ​We Shall Go Out was originally written for a liturgy, titled, Broken Silence by Nicola Slee for the Southwark Ordination Course in 1990. Since then it has been used for a wide variety of situations including weddings and funerals and a service for World Aids Day in Westminster Abbey. It is set to the traditional Irish tune, often called, Danny Boy.

Professor Boyce-Tillman said: "I feel very honoured that my hymn has spoken and will speak to women worldwide. Many of them struggle so hard in oppressive structures. I trust that it will bring them hope and encouragement." Women's World Day of Prayer​ is a worldwide movement of Christian women, ho come together to observe a common day of prayer held on the first Friday in March each year.

The event takes place in over 170 countries, starting at sunrise in the island of Samoa and circling around the globe in a 'Mexican wave' of prayer for about 36 hours, finishing at sunset off the coast of American Samoa.

The service is translated into over 1,000 languages and dialects and each service follows the same format and sings the same hymns in an expression of solidarity, prayer and unity across the world. This year the service has been prepared by the women of the Philippines.

Professor Boyce-Tillman is a prominent academic specialising in music, spirituality and theology, particularly, women's role in church music. She is Professor of Applied Music at the University of Winchester.
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The Hymn: We Shall Go Out: Professor Boyce-Tillman

We shall go out with hope of resurrection.
We shall go out, from strength to strength go on.
We shall go out and tell our stories boldly,
Tales of a love that will not let us go.
We'll sing our songs of wrongs that can be righted.
We'll dream our dreams of hurts that can be healed.
We'll weave a cloth of all the world united
Within the vision of a Christ who sets us free.

We'll give a voice to those who have not spoken.
We'll find the words for those whose lips are sealed.
We'll make the tunes for those who sing no longer,
Vibrating love alive in every heart.
We'll share our joy with those who are still weeping.
Chant hymns of strength for hearts that break in grief.
We'll leap and dance the resurrection story
Including all within the circles of our love.

Image: University of St Andrews


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Birmingham Graduate Stands Close to Win the UK Music Outstanding Graduate Contribution to Music Award: March 01

Image: Birmingham City University

 

|| February 26: 2017: Birmingham City University News || ά. A Birmingham City University graduate is celebrating after being nominated for the UK Music Outstanding Graduate Contribution to Music award. UK Music is an industry-funded body and was established in October 2008 to represent the collective interests of the recorded, published and live arms of the British music industry.

The UK Music Outstanding Graduate Contribution to Music award recognises contributions to music areas including: research, recording, performance, business success and community work. Birmingham City University is one of 11 UK institutions in a pioneering partnership with UK Music, helping to nurture musical passion and prepare individuals for careers in the music industry.

Sophie Lucken graduated from Birmingham City University’s School of Media in 2015 and has been shortlisted after impressing judges with her ongoing commitment and enthusiasm to her personal development. Matt Grimes, Senior Lecturer in Music Industries and Radio at Birmingham City University, said, “It’s really impressive that Sophie secured a high profile job in such a short time since graduating.

“Within a few months of finishing her degree, Sophie was working for The BPI who represent the UK’s recorded music industry. During her time at the University, it was very clear that Sophie appreciated the importance of networking and was constantly engaging with the music industry in some form to help further develop her career.”

Sophie’s placements alongside her studies included working on the Warped Tour, the largest travelling music festival in the United States. “I’m honoured to be nominated for the award.” said Sophie, from Milton Keynes.

''It's true what they say that the hard work really does pay off and I can't thank the tutors at Birmingham City University enough for their help and support in encouraging me to achieve my goals and ambitions.

The winner of the UK Music Outstanding Graduate Contribution to Music award will be announced at a special ceremony in London on March 01  by Kanya King MBE, Founder of the MOBO Awards.
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Whatever Your Field of Work and Wherever in the World You are, Please, Make a Choice to Do All You Can to Seek and Demand the End of Death Penalty For It is Your Business What is Done in Your Name. The Law That Makes Humans Take Part in Taking Human Lives and That Permits and Kills Human Lives is No Law. It is the Rule of the Jungle Where Law Does Not Exist. The Humanion

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Guildford International Music Festival 2017: February 24-March 05

 

|| February 24: 2017: University of Surrey News || ά. Now in its 27th year, the Festival, presented by the University of Surrey, has started today, February 24, for a duration of 10 days, till March 05 with performances taking place in different venues across Guildford. Catering for all tastes and ages, highlights of the Festival include performances by a capella ensemble Apollo 5, opened the Festival at St Nicolas Church in Guildford and a UK premiere of the celebrated StopGap Dance Company’s latest work ‘The Enormous Room’ on February 28 at PATS Studio Theatre at the University of Surrey. Joining proceedings are the critically acclaimed National Youth Jazz Orchestra, fresh from their annual residency at Ronnie Scott’s Jazz Club, performing alongside singers from the Guildford School of Acting:GSA on Friday, March 03 at G Live.

Every year the Guildford International Music Festival continues to grow and attract high profile performers. Taking part in the Festival this year will be internationally renowned violinist Tasmin Little, who has firmly established herself as one of the leading instrumentalists of her generation, who will be performing on Wednesday, March 01. Sharing her expertise, Tasmin will also be hosting a master class with undergraduate musicians from the University of Surrey, helping to nurture a future generation of performers. Guitar legend John Williams will give a performance with his 6 Hands Guitar Trio as part of the Guildford Guitar Day on Saturday, February 25.

In addition to musical performances, a number of expert talks and tours are scheduled to take place. The Cobbe Collection Trust at Hatchlands Park will host a tour of their collection which includes pianos owned and played by composers such as Mozart, J.C. Bach, Chopin and Elgar on March 02. A Sound Walk around Guildford led by Bill Thompson will also take place, opening ears to natural sounds in the environment on March 04.

Ensuring fun for all the family a musical workshop and concert will be held on February 26 at G Live. Hands-on workshops with percussion instruments will be followed by the professional orchestra Southern Pro Musica playing some of classical music’s most exciting pieces.

Pippa Cleary, Director of the Festival from the University of Surrey, said, “This year’s Festival promises something for everyone, to inspire, entertain and challenge audiences. We are delighted to be working with partners across Guildford to put together a programme to suit all tastes and are hugely grateful to our sponsors and supporters for making this event possible.”

For full listings and to book tickets visit or alternatively call 01483 686876.
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Pianistic Poetry: Nikolai Lugansky in Recital: Grand Hall, Lee Shau Kee Lecture Centre, University of Hong Kong: March 26

|| February 22: 2017: University of Hong Kong News || ά. Award-winning pianist Nikolai Lugansky is acclaimed for his elegant virtuosity, blazing energy, artistic refinement and strikingly individual musicianship. Having just made his highly anticipated debut with the Berliner Philharmoniker, Lugansky will be coming to Hong Kong on 26 March 26. His interpretation of Tchaikovsky’s The Seasons, hailed by The New York Times for its entrancing mix of ‘roomy expressive freedom’ and ‘textural clarity’ will be presented together with a rich selection of Chopin. The Herald describes him as ''… a pianist who has absolute intellectual control, staggering technical ability, delicate poeticism and a piratical spirit all in magical harmony.'' The Recital is taking place on Sunday, March 26 at 15:00 at the Grand Hall, Lee Shau Kee Lecture Centre, at the University of Hong Kong.

Lugansky  was born in Moscow in 1972. At the age of seven, he entered the Central School of Music in Moscow and studied with Tatiana Kestner and then with legendary pianist Tatiana Nikolaeva. Nikolayeva, once said he would become ‘the pianist of tomorrow’ and today he is arguably one of the most influential pianists of his generation. Winner of the 10th International Tchaikovsky Competition, Lugansky’s performance ‘blazes with conviction, a propulsion and energy finely complemented with an innate sense of poetry.’ Gramophone. This sense of poetry makes him a perfect interpreter of Tchaikovsky and Chopin’s music. Your are invited to join the recital on a sensational journey through the seasons, singing with his fingers the music written by the poet of the piano.

There would be a lot of Tchaikovsky and a great deal of Chopin.  Programme Enquiries: 3917 8165. For tickets. For more information, contact: Ms June Lui: Manager, Cultural Management Office, HKU: Tel: 3917 7753 | Email: junelch at hku.hk.

Described by Gramophone as ’the most trailblazing and meteoric performer of all’ Nikolai Lugansky is a pianist of extraordinary depth and versatility.
Concerto highlights for the 2016:17 season include his debuts with both the Berliner Philharmoniker and Wiener Symphoniker; return engagements with the Philharmonia Orchestra, St Petersburg Philharmonic, Orchestre National de France, Philadelphia Orchestra, St Louis Symphony, and the Tokyo Metropolitan Symphony. Lugansky continues his cycle of all of Prokofiev’s piano concertos with the Royal Scottish National Orchestra to celebrate the 125th anniversary of the orchestra and birth of the composer.

Upcoming recital performances include the Alte Oper Frankfurt, London’s Wigmore Hall, Paris’ Théâtre des Champs-Elysées, Geneva, Budapest, the Great Hall of the Moscow Conservatoire, and the Great Hall of the St Petersburg Philharmonia. Lugansky regularly appears at some of the world's most distinguished festivals, including in the coming season, La Roque d’Anthéron, Verbier, Tanglewood, and Ravinia.

An award winning recording artist, Nikolai Lugansky’s recital CD featuring Rachmaninov's Piano Sonatas won the Diapason d’Or and an ECHO Klassik Award while his recording of concertos by Grieg and Prokofiev with Kent Nagano and the Deutsches Symphonie-Orchester Berlin was a Gramophone Editor’s Choice. His earlier recordings have also won a number of awards, including a Diapason d'Or, BBC Music Magazine Award and ECHO Klassik prize. Lugansky’s most recent disc of Schubert C minor sonata and Impromptus D.935 was released in 2016. A new recording of Tchaikovsky’s Grande Sonata and The Seasons is due for release in early 2017.

Lugansky is Artistic Director of the Tambov Rachmaninov Festival and is also a supporter of and regular performer at, the Rachmaninov Estate and Museum of Ivanovka. Nikolai Lugansky studied at Moscow’s Central Music School and the Moscow Conservatoire where his teachers included Tatiana Kestner, Tatiana Nikolayeva and Sergei Dorensky. He was awarded the honour of People’s Artist of Russia in April 2013.
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Whatever Your Field of Work and Wherever in the World You are, Please, Make a Choice to Do All You Can to Seek and Demand the End of Death Penalty For It is Your Business What is Done in Your Name. The Law That Makes Humans Take Part in Taking Human Lives and That Permits and Kills Human Lives is No Law. It is the Rule of the Jungle Where Law Does Not Exist. The Humanion

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The Art of Religion Expressed in Music at University of St Andrews: February 19

Image: Institute for Theology, Imagination and the Arts:ITIA