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 First Published: September 24: 2015
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Literature Arkive Year Alpha and Year Beta

 

VI London Poetry Festival 2017: October 14-17

 

 

Dr Kathryn Rudy, Who is a Senior Lecturer of Art History at The University of St Andrews, Has Written a Book: Piety in Pieces: How Medieval Readers Customised Their Manuscripts, Which Looks Into Worlds of Human Minds Seeking to Make Their Marks

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

To The Reader

O Reader may you travel well on this road
Where hurts are hard but life finds wells of joys
Where things happen and dreams are born
Where wings are grown and days are formed

O Reader may you travel well light and lit and
See how on this road in joys' vineyard all souls
Grow young and old forever remaining true and
Reaching furthest seizing deepest as they cut all

The hard of life the soft of days and nights for it
All lacks a manual where one must define where
One must dream to cut and shape one's shapes

So walk not alone for I shall neutrino-like follow
Your steps for you and I are word-bound-soul O
Reader may you travel  well always light and lit

Munayem Mayenin: October 11, 2015

Image: Portrait of Charlotte Bronte: Public Domain

 

Now I am Not Running for President: I am Here From Emmaarner Rise to The Elleesium with the Word: Hillary Clinton to Join London and  Cheltenham Literature Festivals: October 15

 

 

|| September 08: 2017 || ά.

Ms Hillary Rodham Clinton is to join this year's Southbank Centre’s London Literature Festival and the Cheltenham Literature Festival on Sunday, October 15. In exclusive UK appearances, Ms Clinton makes her debut at Southbank Centre’s Royal Festival Hall for an evening event at London Literature Festival following an appearance at the Cheltenham Literature Festival earlier in the day. The one-off events mark Ms Clinton’s only UK appearances to discuss her new book, What Happened, an autobiographical account describing her experience as the Democratic Party's nominee for President of the United States in the 2016 election.

Published by Simon and Schuster on Tuesday, September 12, What Happened chronicles, for the first time, what Ms Clinton was thinking and feeling during one of the most controversial and unpredictable presidential elections in history.  In these two events, audiences will experience a unique opportunity to hear Ms Clinton reflect on her personal experience of becoming the first woman nominated for president by a major party in an election marked by rage, sexism, exhilarating highs and infuriating lows, stranger-than-fiction twists, alleged Russian interference  and an opponent, who didn’t play by the usual political rules.

Audience members can expect to hear Ms Clinton speak candidly about how she has coped with a shocking and devastating loss, the rituals, relationships, and reading, that got her through and what the experience has taught her about life. Mr Ted Hodgkinson, Senior Programmer, Literature and Spoken Word, Southbank Centre, said, “At Southbank Centre we believe stories have the power to connect us across cultural and political divides and help us make sense of a world increasingly caught between extremes.

Whose story is more necessary and timely today than Hillary Rodham Clinton's? She joins London Literature Festival's stellar line-up of writers exploring the theme 'World on the Brink' and promises to offer rare insights into her personal experience of the twists and turns that led to last year's historic election result.”

Ms Caroline Hutton, Chair of the Cheltenham Literature Festival, sponsored by The Times and The Sunday Times, said, “These past 18 months have been the most extraordinary time in American politics. We couldn’t be more excited and honoured to have Hillary Rodham Clinton in person at our Literature Festival, giving us her first-hand perspective. From debut novelists and cutting-edge spoken-word artists to some of the world’s most influential thought leaders and agenda-setters our Literature Festival prides itself on bringing the most outstanding voices to Cheltenham every year.”

Ms Hillary Rodham Clinton’s event at Southbank Centre’s London Literature Festival takes place during the opening weekend of the festival, which runs from Friday-Wednesday, October 13-November 01 and features 20 days of live readings, performance, talks, debates, installations, workshops and music across Southbank Centre’s 17-acre site. Speakers include the recently announced Mr Tom Hanks, along with Ms Anne Carson, MMs Tracy Chevalier, Goldie, Mr Karl Ove Knausgård, MS Annie Leibovitz, Mr David Mitchell, Mr Philip Pullman, Ms Claudia Rankine, Sjón and more.

Ms Hillary Rodham Clinton’s event on the final day of Cheltenham Literature Festival takes place at The Centaur, Cheltenham Racecourse. The UK’s oldest literature festival, which runs from Friday-Sunday, October 06-15, covers a diverse programme of current affairs, history, visual art, sport, food, fashion, lifestyle, psychology, science and business as well as fiction, poetry and a packed family programme. Speakers include Mr Salman Rushdie, Mr Alan Hollinghurst, Ms Sarah Waters, Mr Brendan Cox, Mr David Mach, Ms Nadiya Hussain, Mr Russell Brand, Ms Lauren Child, Mr Andrew O’Hagan, Mr Matt Lucas, Mr Nikesh Shukla, MR Inua Ellams and MR Robert Webb.

Tickets for Mr Hillary Rodham Clinton’s event at Southbank Centre’s London Literature Festival are on sale to Southbank Centre Members on Thursday, September 14.

Tickets for Ms Hillary Rodham Clinton’s event at Cheltenham Literature Festival are on sale to Cheltenham Festivals Members on Friday, September 15.

Southbank Centre’s London Literature Festival
Hillary Rodham Clinton: What Happened
Southbank Centre’s London Literature Festival
Sunday: October 15, 19:30, Royal Festival Hall Auditorium
Tickets £45 and £70 Ticket includes a copy of Hillary Rodham Clinton’s new book What Happened: RRP £20.

'In the past, for reasons I try to explain, I’ve often felt I had to be careful in public, like I was up on a wire without a net. Now I’m letting my guard down.' Hillary Rodham Clinton, from the introduction of What Happened

Southbank Centre's London Literature Festival is proud to present Hillary Rodham Clinton, the first woman nominated for US president by a major party. In this candid interview, she discusses her most personal memoir to date, What Happened, which depicts a tumultuous election that had the world on tenterhooks, filled with breathtaking highs and lows, stranger-than-fiction twists and allegations of sexism and Russian interference. In her memoir, she describes what it was like to run against opponent Donald Trump and the extreme scrutiny she has been placed under in her position as a strong woman in the public eye. She discusses the mistakes she made, how she has coped with a shocking and devastating loss, and how she found the strength to pick herself back up after an historically unprecedented election, where her defeat led to protests across the United States and throughout the world. In her only London appearance, she talks about the rituals, relationships and reading that got her back on her feet, and what the experience has taught her about life.

For more information or to buy tickets please visit the Southbank Centre website or call 0203 879 9555.

Cheltenham Literature Festival

Hillary Rodham Clinton
Sunday: October 15, 12:00: The Centaur, Cheltenham Racecourse
Tickets £40 and £50 Ticket includes a copy of Hillary Rodham Clinton’s new book What Happened:RRP £20.

“In the past, for reasons I try to explain, I’ve often felt I had to be careful in public, like I was up on a wire without a net. Now I’m letting my guard down.”

In this intensely personal and revealing interview, Hillary Rodham Clinton discusses her memoir, What Happened. She gives a no-holds barred account of the experience of becoming the first woman nominated for president by a major party in an election marked by rage, sexism, exhilarating highs and infuriating lows, stranger-than-fiction twists, Russian interference, and an opponent who broke all the rules. The election of 2016 was unprecedented and historic. This is a candid account of that campaign and its aftermath from the extraordinary woman in the eye of the storm.

For more information or to buy tickets please visit the Cheltenham Festivals website  or call 01242 850270.

About Southbank Centre: Southbank Centre is the UK’s largest arts centre, occupying a 17­-acre site that sits in the midst of London’s most vibrant cultural quarter on the South Bank of the Thames. The site has an extraordinary creative and architectural history stretching back to the 1951 Festival of Britain. Southbank Centre is home to Royal Festival Hall, Queen Elizabeth Hall, Purcell Room and Hayward Gallery as well as the National Poetry Library and the Arts Council Collection. s

About London Literature Festival: Southbank Centre's London Literature Festival, now in its 11th year, features twenty days of live readings, performance, talks, debates, visual displays, workshops and music across the site. For the first time, the festival opens with Poetry International​ ​on its 50th birthday, the biennial festival founded in 1967 by former poet laureate Ted Hughes. London Literature Festival authors and poets will bring their unique reflections on a 'World on the Brink' ​and explore how literature can help us make sense of a world increasingly caught between extremes. Spearheading this theme is a celebration of Nordic writers and culture, tying in with Southbank Centre's year-long programme Nordic Matters. Other highlights include a major project from the National Poetry Library to rescue poetry in endangered languages, the exclusive London launch of the long-awaited sequel to Nelson Mandela​’s Long Walk to Freedom and the return of the Young Adult Literature Weekender. Authors and poets appearing throughout the festival include Philip Pullman, Annie Leibovitz, Tom Hanks, Claudia Rankine, Anne Carson, Karl Ove ​Knausgård, Tracy Chevalier, David Mitchell, Sjón and more.

About the Cheltenham Literature Festival: Tens of thousands of book-lovers of all ages, including over 7,000 schoolchildren, will head to Cheltenham in October for the UK’s oldest literature festival, for ten days of literary celebration, discussion and debate. Under the umbrella theme:Who Do We Think We Are? sessions will cover key questions about British identity and celebrate Britain’s rich literary and cultural heritage. Around 1,000 speakers will take part in more than 550 events at the family-friendly Festival Village, in the heart of Regency Cheltenham. Five Guest Curators will bring fresh perspectives and voices to the Festival. They are: Will Gompertz, BBC Arts Editor; Sarah Moss, novelist, travel writer and academic; Robin Niblett, Director of Chatham House; Jess Phillips, Labour MP for Birmingham Yardley; and Nikesh Shukla, author, editor and campaigner. ω.

 

Whatever Your Field of Work and Wherever in the World You are, Please, Make a Choice to Do All You Can to Seek and Demand the End of Death Penalty For It is Your Business What is Done in Your Name. The Law That Makes Humans Take Part in Taking Human Lives and That Permits and Kills Human Lives is No Law. It is the Rule of the Jungle Where Law Does Not Exist. The Humanion

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Fiona Mozley's Debut Novel Elmet Has Made It Onto the Long-List of the Man Booker Prize

Image: John Murray

 

|| July 31: 2017: University of York News  || ά. A PhD student at the University of York has been long-listed for the Man Booker Prize for her debut novel. Ms Fiona Mozley, 29, who is in the third year of her PhD in medieval eco-politics, was not allowed to tell anyone about her nomination for the £50,000 prize for her novel Elmet.  The novel tells the story of a father and his two children, who build a home for themselves in a copse in South Yorkshire.

The family lives on the margins of society with the father a bare-knuckle boxer, who builds the house and then comes into conflict with the landowners. It is published on August 10 by John Murray. “I found writing the novel really complemented my PhD study.” M Mozley said. “There’s a lot of creativity, that has to go into a PhD, even though, it is much more rigorous than writing a novel. There is a lot of research and analysis, but there is, also, a creative element, as well. But I found writing the novel helped my PhD and vice versa.

But it was, also, a nice break from the rigours of a PhD. Whilst there is creativity in both, they are both very different.” Ms Mozley, who was an undergraduate at Cambridge University, was living in London and working as an intern for a literary agent when she started Elmet four years ago.

She comes from York. She started writing the novel on a train from York to London as she realised she missed the landscape of home. She continued writing the novel while juggling the demands of her PhD studies at the University’s Centre for Medieval Studies and finished the book last summer.

''I didn’t tell my mum and dad that I was writing it until I had signed my publishing contract. There is another book in the pipeline, not a sequel to Elmet, but being a novelist is something I wish to pursue.”

Should she win the Man Booker she would be the second youngest winner of the prize. The current favourite is Solar Bones by Mike McCormack, with Ali Smith’s Autumn, also, among the front-runners.

There are four US authors on the long list of 13 for the prize, the rules of the Prize were changed in 2014 to include any English language novel published in the UK. ω.

Whatever Your Field of Work and Wherever in the World You are, Please, Make a Choice to Do All You Can to Seek and Demand the End of Death Penalty For It is Your Business What is Done in Your Name. The Law That Makes Humans Take Part in Taking Human Lives and That Permits and Kills Human Lives is No Law. It is the Rule of the Jungle Where Law Does Not Exist. The Humanion

|| Readmore  || ‽: 010817  || Up || 

 

 

Dear Doctor: Why Won't You Be My Author for the Sake of the BMA: You Might Even Win a Prize Since It is a Competition: Deadline July 31

 

|| July 19: 2017 || ά. Just because you are a practising doctor does not mean that you should not know that there is a difference between practice and practise, than and then and its and it's and there and they're, and that, you should not know how to use the pen equally capably as you hold and use the scalpel. And then, you pause and wonder, what is this piece going on about: well, if you are a member of the British Medical Association:BMA, than you will soon realise what this piece is all about. It appears that BMA has taken leave off its 'field' and ventured into the 'territory', that is the only place left for us to roam, writing that is, and that, they had the 'dare' to start, once again, a writing competition and all for the benefits of their own members! Speak about nepotism! It can not be any more unfair than this; can it! A competition, open to only the doctors, who are their members. Anyhow, the Competition is open for submissions and the deadline is the last day of this month.

Well, we are glad that the BMA has people still thinking about organising these little things; these little things, that are important. Essential. For not matter what we become we never cease to be human and part of this humanity is our creativity and to use it and celebrate it is a wonderful thing. But remember, the deadline: Monday. July 31. Therefore, you will have to hurry and get that pen out of, wherever the last time you had used it to write, and let the neurons collide and create a thoughtscape and there you are with just only 800 words; that's all the BMA wants. About what: well, they are not asking you to authors easy little things, like what you do with a cardiac arrest patient or one suffering a stroke. No, they are asking you to speak of 'doing the right thing'. Now, please, do not even think about David Cameron and his mantra, doing the right thing'. He and his lot, could not even spell right, even if their life depended on it and so you can see the mess they have created and left the arena to others, who are carrying on with the same, expanding on the mess. But leaving off politics, this is about ethics, about morality and about principles, that guide one's personal morality, guided by which, one makes one's choices and then go about executing them.

And thus, in short, Be My Authors, you all BMA members and see whether you, may, inspire yourself to write a micro-treatise on what it is to be a 'right thing' and how does one assess what is right and, particularly, when, that what appears to be right does not actually turn out to be as such after execution. Further, what kind of right because there is politically right, there is legally right, there is socially right, there is morally and philosophically right and then, you find, there is scientifically right, logically right, evidentially right, something might even be prime facie right and that goes on. And then, what is the difference between right and what appears advantageous? However, this short piece, is simply to inspire you to take the pen and go on a little pilgrimage, where only thoughts are your Hippocrates and you take a long walk by the River or in the Park, or in the Green or wherever else or in the little balcony and write down just 800 words and send them off to the BMA so that they know that they should keep out of venturing into other people's territory and mind the business of looking after our wonderful physicians. Take care and be and see nothing but what the water sees: the skies, the heavens always resonating the neurology of the Universe, that is always right, always in tune and unison with itself. ω.

Whatever Your Field of Work and Wherever in the World You are, Please, Make a Choice to Do All You Can to Seek and Demand the End of Death Penalty For It is Your Business What is Done in Your Name. The Law That Makes Humans Take Part in Taking Human Lives and That Permits and Kills Human Lives is No Law. It is the Rule of the Jungle Where Law Does Not Exist. The Humanion

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The Ulysses Centre at Newman House: To Strive: To Seek: To Find: And Not To Yield

Image: University College Dublin

 

|| July 17: 2017: University College Dublin News || ά. The Ulysses Centre is being developed by University College Dublin in partnership with the National Library of Ireland:NLI in UCD’s Newman House on St Stephen’s Green and will open in Q4 of 2018. Newman House was the original location of UCD when its antecedent Catholic University of Ireland was opened by John Henry Newman in 1854. The Ulysses Centre is located in the former aula maxima of UCD, which has lain dormant for many years. Architects Scott Tallon Walker are designing the structure and the project includes, additional conservation and fire and safety work in numbers 85 and 86 St Stephen’s Green, the core houses, that make up Newman House.

The exhibition design is being undertaken by Ralph Appelbaum Associates and is planned to balance the period details of the building with an immersive visitor experience. Funding for the Ulysses Centre has come from philanthropists Martin and Carmel Naughton, Failte Ireland and University College Dublin. And now, imagine that Ulysses himself, somehow, finds himself being alive, not in the Dubliners nor in any other place but standing right outside The Ulysses Centre at Newman House and what would he make of it: this very house, that bears his name? He would probably wonder: well, if destiny takes my home than it is this very destiny, that shall be my home. And what is the destiny but: To strive, to seek, to find and not to yield...

And The Ulysses Centre sought for a Director and now it appears that this search for the first Director of the Centre, who combines a strong background in literature and the Arts with a proven capacity to build a centre, that attracts the 'culturally curious', has been completed with the appointment of Mr Simon O’Connor. A composer by training, Mr Simon O'Connor was the founding Curator of the Little Museum of Dublin, building the museum from scratch in 2011 to managing its highly ambitious exhibition programme to date.

Under his tenure, the museum achieved exponential visitor growth and won numerous awards, including the European Commission's Europa Nostra award for Cultural Heritage, the Business to Arts Judges Special Recognition Award, and was shortlisted for the European Museum of the Year Awards. He has worked across the arts and creative sector, and continues to be active as a composer – his most recent song cycle, ‘Left Behind’, formed the centrepiece of the Irish State’s International Women’s Day 2016 centenary celebration.

"It is an honour to be appointed first Director of this incredibly exciting centre in the heart of the capital city." said Mr O'Connor. "This is a huge opportunity to create a focal point for 20th and 21st century Irish writing in the unique location, where James Joyce and many generations of later writers studied. Our ambition is to engage visitors with the creative spirit at the core of our society.

The unique partnership of UCD and the National Library of Ireland, combined with the incredible generosity of our philanthropic supporters, ensures the centre will be at the very heart of the city's cultural life. I look forward to working with our stakeholders to develop a centre and visitor attraction, that amplifies and illuminates Ireland's literary and creative offering for audiences of every age, both local and global.''

''One of the National Library’s strategic priorities is to connect people everywhere with our wonderful collections.” said NLI Director Dr Sandra Collins. “The Ulysses Centre and our partnership with UCD is an important part of this goal. Simon O’Connor’s experience, drive and fresh perspective will ensure that the Centre becomes a welcoming and vibrant cultural destination, attracting visitors of all ages and nationalities and opening up the riches of Irish literature in exciting new ways.”

Professor Margaret Kelleher, Chair of Anglo-Irish Literature and Drama, UCD said, “We warmly welcome the appointment of Simon O’Connor and the creative expertise and vision, which he will bring to the post of director. The Ulysses Centre at Newman House will provide a landmark literary venue, sharing with the public the unique cultural heritage and resources which UCD and NLI possess, and supporting the continuing vitality of Irish writing in the present and future.”
ω.

Whatever Your Field of Work and Wherever in the World You are, Please, Make a Choice to Do All You Can to Seek and Demand the End of Death Penalty For It is Your Business What is Done in Your Name. The Law That Makes Humans Take Part in Taking Human Lives and That Permits and Kills Human Lives is No Law. It is the Rule of the Jungle Where Law Does Not Exist. The Humanion

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Do Not You Go A-Twisting Into the Night Henry: That Will Upset Dylan Thomas: Rebecca F John and Her The Haunting of Henry Twist

Rebecca F. John. Image: Grant Hyatt Photography

 

|| July  16: 2017: Swansea University || ά. In a hugely significant breakthrough for a young writer, Swansea University BA and MA Creative Writing graduate Ms Rebecca F John has just had her first novel The Haunting of Henry Twist published by Serpent's Tail. The book, which has been described as ‘a mysterious love story set in 1926, that recalls the power and strangeness of Stevenson’s Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde’ centres on the protagonist Henry Twist. Recently made a widower by result of a tragic accident, he is left with an infant daughter to raise. Quickly becoming reclusive in his behaviour and fearful that his child will be taken from him, he only ventures out under the cover of darkness.

It is on the murky post war London streets, that he encounters a shadowy figure suffering with amnesia called Jack. Jack is strangely familiar to Henry, and Henry is both afraid of and drawn to him. But who is this mystery man?' Ms John, who comes from Swansea and continues a close association with Swansea University’s Creative Writing programme, has already enjoyed much success with her short stories. The Dog Track, was broadcast on BBC Radio Four in 2013 and Salting Home was highly commended in the 2014 Manchester Fiction Prize. In 2015, her short story The Glove Maker’s Numbers was shortlisted for the Sunday Times EFG Short Story Award.

She is the winner of the PEN International New Voices Award 2015 and was the British participant of the 2016 Scritture Giovani project. In 2017, she was shortlisted for the RA and Pindrop Short Story Prize and named on the Hay Festival’s The Hay 30 list.

Ms John is currently touring the UK with a series of launches of The Haunting of Henry Twist. Professor D. J. Britton, Director of Creative Writing at Swansea University, said, "This is a fantastic step forward by a young writer of enormous talent. The Swansea Creative Writing team are very proud to have been part of Rebecca's journey of literary achievement, her commitment and determination serve as a superb example to other emerging writers in Wales."

Ms John said, ''I dreamed of becoming a novelist from a very young age and seeing that dream fulfilled, particularly, with a publisher of Serpent’s Tail’s calibre, is an incredibly gratifying experience. I’ve worked hard to achieve my ambitions and studying at Swansea was an enjoyable and worthwhile part of that process, where I was surrounded by writers for the first time and was able to share my work and hopes with excellent peers.

I’m so thrilled that The Haunting of Henry Twist is now published and available for others to read that I feel just like my ten-year-old self again, brimming with ideas and excitement at the weight of a book in her hands.”ω.

Whatever Your Field of Work and Wherever in the World You are, Please, Make a Choice to Do All You Can to Seek and Demand the End of Death Penalty For It is Your Business What is Done in Your Name. The Law That Makes Humans Take Part in Taking Human Lives and That Permits and Kills Human Lives is No Law. It is the Rule of the Jungle Where Law Does Not Exist. The Humanion

|| Readmore || ‽: 170717 || Up  ||   

 

 

 

 

 

Godiva Festival 2017: July 07-09: Coventry Bids to Be the Next UK City of Culture in 2021

 

|| July 07: 2017: Coventry University News || ά. The Godiva Festival 2017 is gearing up to celebrate its 19th year. The Festival takes place on July 07-09. This year Coventry University is sponsoring the three day family event. The Festival is the biggest free family musical festival in the UK. It continues a proud artistic heritage for the University, which is committed to developing new creative talent. Along with the University of Warwick and the Council, Coventry University is, also, a key member of the consortium, bidding to make its hometown the UK’s next City of Culture in 2021.

Mr John Latham, Vice-Chancellor of the University, said, “We’re passionate about the arts and the city and we know how well-loved the Coventry Godiva Festival is within the city and beyond. It’s a highlight of Coventry’s cultural calendar so we are delighted to give our support to the event. The festival provides a great opportunity for people in the city and the surrounding area to see leading artists performing live on their doorstep for free. It also provides a great boost to the local economy. Moreover, it’s helped to enhance our cultural reputation and that’s really important; never more so than this year when Coventry is making a bid for the City of Culture title.”

Councillor Mr Abdul Khan, Deputy Leader and Cabinet Member responsible for Events, is delighted with the link-up. He said, “We have a long history of working in partnership with Coventry University and this deal strengthens that further. To have them on board makes a significant difference to our ability to deliver another great event for the city which we know remains a highlight in the calendar, not just in Coventry but right across the wider region.

Securing sponsorship for the Coventry Godiva Festival was something we have been looking to achieve as the income it will generate will help to offset the financial cost of this wonderful and popular event at a time of considerable wider challenges we face as a Council.”

The University is bringing a few surprises along with us on Saturday and  Sunday, July 08-09. You are invited to join the University between 12:00 and 17:00 in the family area to enter the Coventry Uni Accelerator, where you can win an iPad, a VR headset and more.

Step inside our machine of opportunity, where grabbing hold of as many tickets as you can will put you on to our winners leaderboard! Everyone's guaranteed a prize, but we've got some extra special giveaways any student would love to get their hands on. ω.

Whatever Your Field of Work and Wherever in the World You are, Please, Make a Choice to Do All You Can to Seek and Demand the End of Death Penalty For It is Your Business What is Done in Your Name. The Law That Makes Humans Take Part in Taking Human Lives and That Permits and Kills Human Lives is No Law. It is the Rule of the Jungle Where Law Does Not Exist. The Humanion

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The Chatsworth Festival 2017: September 22-24

Clockwise from top left: Grayson Perry, Christopher Kane, Lady Burlington, Cornelia Parker and Tristram Hunt are among the first speakers
announced for Art Out Loud 2017.
 

|| June 26: 2017 || ά.  Chatsworth, home to the Duke and Duchess of Devonshire, announces the first speakers appearing at its annual festival Art Out Loud 2017, taking place on September 22-24. Now in its third year, Art Out Loud will host an array of speakers from across the art world. Among the first names to be announced for this year’s festival is artist and broadcaster Mr Grayson Perry, who returns to Chatsworth after a sell-out talk at Art Out Loud 2015.

Also, appearing at the Festival are sculptor Ms Cornelia Parker, who was recently announced as the official artist of the 2017 general election, new Director of the Victoria and Albert Museum and former MP Mr Tristram Hunt and highly acclaimed British sculptor Mr Marc Quinn. New for 2017 and tying in with Chatsworth’s major exhibition: House Style: Five Centuries of Fashion at Chatsworth, the festival features leading figures from the world of fashion.

These include Lady Burlington, the driving force behind House Style and celebrated fashion designer Mr Christopher Kane. Art Out Loud is a festival of talks, that takes place in a marquee on the South Lawn and in Chatsworth’s historic Theatre. The full three-day programme will be announced in June, including educational elements for local schools and students.

Tickets for The Chatsworth Festival Art Out Loud will go on sale on June 06. Festival Day Tickets will be available for Friday, Saturday and Sunday, allowing visitors to attend multiple talks of their choice with the advance purchase of just one ticket for each day.

All Art Out Loud ticket holders will have access to the Chatsworth Garden and Sotheby’s Beyond Limits monumental sculpture exhibition. Visitors can upgrade their tickets on the day to include admission to Chatsworth House and the House Style exhibition, which runs until October 22.

The Chatsworth Festival: Art Out Loud: Friday-Sunday, September 22-24, 2017: Chatsworth, Bakewell, Derbyshire, DE45 1PP

About Chatsworth: Chatsworth, set in the heart of the Peak District, is home to the Duke and Duchess of Devonshire and has been passed down through 16 generations of the Cavendish family. As well as its inspiring architecture, landscape and history, Chatsworth also houses the Devonshire Collection, one of Europe’s most significant art collections. Successive generations of the Cavendish family have commissioned leading artists as well as those less well known since the 17th century up until today.

The 12th Duke and Duchess, and their son and daughter-in-law, share their predecessors’ enthusiasm for contemporary art. Fine and decorative art acquired over nearly 500 years, is on view throughout the visitor route. Family portraits by Lucian Freud and Sir Joshua Reynolds share rooms with works by Sir Anthony Caro, Ai Weiwei and Michael Craig-Martin. Outdoor sculpture by Allen Jones, Barry Flanagan and Richard Long join 18th-century marbles in the garden; Umbrella two and High Heel, by Michael Craig-Martin, are the latest, permanent additions to the garden.

Inside the house, the most significant art installation at Chatsworth since the creation of the Sculpture Gallery in 1832, opened to visitors in spring 2014. Jacob van der Beugel represents the Cavendish family’s DNA in ceramic panels on the walls of the North Sketch Gallery, in an unusual and creative take on the traditional portrait. These contemporary commissions embody Chatsworth: personal, forward-looking and enthusiastically shared with visitors. In 2017, Chatsworth is hosting its most ambitious exhibition to date, House Style: five centuries of fashion at Chatsworth. Running from 25 March 25 to October 22, House Style showcases never-before-seen items from the Devonshire Collection to tell the stories of some of the fascinating individuals to have walked the Chatsworth floors. The exhibition is included with entry to the house.

The Chatsworth House Trust is an independent charity set up by the 11th Duke of Devonshire in 1981, to ensure the long-term survival of Chatsworth House, the art collection, garden, woodlands and park for the long term benefit of the public. The charity promotes the study and appreciation of Chatsworth as a place of historic, architectural and artistic interest and of natural beauty, and encourages the use and enjoyment of Chatsworth by visitors for education and recreation.
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Whatever Your Field of Work and Wherever in the World You are, Please, Make a Choice to Do All You Can to Seek and Demand the End of Death Penalty For It is Your Business What is Done in Your Name. The Law That Makes Humans Take Part in Taking Human Lives and That Permits and Kills Human Lives is No Law. It is the Rule of the Jungle Where Law Does Not Exist. The Humanion

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Here Presented is the National Young Writer 2017: David Williams: Now Make Way Dystopia


 

|| June 21: 2017 || ά. A 12 year old from London Barking has been crowned the winner of the National Young Writers’ Awards 2017! Mr David Williams’ story about a robot in 3017 triumphed over 10,000 entries from all across the UK. Author, TV presenter and adventurer, Mr Steve Backshall surprised Young David with his prize at his school to mark the tremendous achievement. The special presentation assembly took place on Tuesday, June 20 at All Saints Catholic School in Dagenham.

The annual competition is organised by tuition provider, Explore Learning. This year’s theme was ‘The Future’. Children were tasked with writing a 500 word story set in 3017! Entries were judged by Mr Steve Backshall and the team at Explore Learning, who selected David’s futuristic tale as the overall winning story and awarded him a trophy, a trip to Disneyland Paris for his family and £500 worth of books for his school! Robots were overwhelmingly the most popular characters in this year’s entries and appeared in almost a third of the young writers’ stories, 31%.

Whilst other subjects were used as well, such as, teleportation, rockets and jets were the common modes of transport. Meanwhile, planet earth was the most popular location, followed by the Moon and Mars. It was David’s story that came out on top; a tale of a robot who wants to be accepted by the world and explore.

Mr Steve Backshall says, “The quality of the stories was beyond belief! If I didn’t know this was a competition for young writers, I’d believe I was reading the scribblings of Isaac Asimov or Philip K Dick, every story was original and had its own sense of individuality. What astounded me more than anything was that these young people had not only imagined future worlds, but imbued them with the conundrums of our modern planet; pollution, greed, climate-change, the disturbing dark potential of Ai and genetic modification.

It gives me great hope that our young people are aware and concerned about these critical issues, and writing with such extraordinary maturity. I had to choose the piece that stood out as the most publishable. David’s tale of the awakening of consciousness in a sentient robot was the most complete of all. It stayed with me and had me imagining a whole dystopian world. David Williams, I expect I will be seeing your work in my local bookstore before too long in the post-apocalyptic future!”

Winner, Mr David Williams says, “I feel so happy. Winning the National Young Writers’ Awards is one of the things that’ll help me prepare to be an author. I can’t believe I have accomplished it, I’ve written something worth reading!”

Every child that entered the National Young Writers’ Award received a certificate to celebrate their story, along with personalised feedback from Explore Learning. The top ten runners up won an engraved pen from National Stationery Week sponsors, Sheaffer, whilst all regional winners received prize bundles with goodies from National Stationery Week partners, Nu notebooks, Mustard, edding, Maped Helix, Write Size, Manuscript and Stabilo.

Mr Carey Ann Dodah, Head of Curriculum Development at Explore Learning, says, “This year’s National Young Writers’ Awards attracted so many entries and all were thoughtful and inventive. We were especially thrilled to see so many children demonstrate their interest in such important matters concerning the future. It’s so positive to see not only great writing ability but also that children are engaging with key environmental issues and politics. A huge congratulations to our worthy winner David for his very intriguing interpretation of 3017!”

Ms Clare Cantle, Head Teacher at All Saints Catholic School, says, “We are all incredibly proud of David’s outstanding achievement. To win a competition with 10,000 entries is such a fantastic recognition of his talents in writing. I am sure we will be reading much more of his work in the future.”

Winning Entry: The Robot: By David Williams: Age 12


I didn't start out as much. I was just a pile of scrap metal in a junkyard. This was the first part of my life. And it stayed like this for many years. However, around 3017, a young man came along and decided to construct a robot. And that robot was yours truly. I have to admit, my creator was indeed a genius, worthy of even Einstein. Even though the parts he created me with weren't top quality, I was the most advanced of my kind. I even developed human emotions, which was what set me apart from other robots. For a while, life was bliss. Until my creator became demented...

Yes, my inventor had become insane. Thanks to my newly developed emotions, I felt a certain amount of sorrow for him and his family. My sorrow turned to hatred, though, for his dementia meant I was confined to a life in a dusty lab which was more pedestrian than a rock. That lab was my prison. I longed to go out into the World and explore. I wanted to see global works of ultra, modern architecture. I wanted to indulge myself with human culture and great works of literature. That was going to be hard, considering the fact that humans would've feared my appearance, my creator was a terrible designer. Since I dreaded my mundane life, I started constructing an escape plan.

Today's the day I put my escape plan to action. It was simple yet fool proof. For many months, during the lab’s closed hours, I'd been creating an artificial skin for me to wear, so I'd resemble one of the staff. And I have to admit, my handiwork wasn't too bad. Well, here goes nothing...So far so good. I'd managed to fool every scientist in this establishment. I was at the main entrance. Freedom was a few steps away for me. Unfortunately, my costume had a loose thread. Which therefore meant my disguise came loose.

Everybody could see me for what I really was. So I ran outside. As soon as I was in broad daylight, some people fainted, shrieked or ran. But I took no notice, for I was mesmerised by what I saw: hovercars gliding gracefully and towering skyscrapers, with their peaks touching the fluffy clouds. It was true beautiful. However, I didn't enjoy it long. Security guards were in pursuit of me. Luckily, I ran down an ally and dived into a bin. When I peeked out, they'd vanished. Suddenly, the bin started to shake.

My audio receptors detected groaning and creaking. I was thrown into a dark space. Then I realised I was in a garbage truck. Which meant that I'd be compressed. I felt the walls closing in on me. My robotic strength meant that I could use my arms to stop the walls crushing me. But not forever...Ends. Copyrights to this story, The Robot, is @David Williams.

About Explore Learning: Explore Learning provides maths and English tuition for 05-14 year olds. Over 35,000 children attend Explore Learning centres every week. There is 126 centres across the UK. All courses are aligned to the National Curriculum and Curriculum for Excellence and Explore Learning tutors select appropriate resources for each child to ensure they cover a combination of courses, enabling them to reach their potential in all areas. All Explore centres are located in areas that are convenient for families to attend, these include centres within shopping centres such as Westfield London, Lakeside, Cabot Circus and Sainsbury’s supermarkets. Explore Learning were named the best Private Tuition Centre Operator in the EducationInvestor Awards 2014, 2015 and 2016, the 57th best company to work for by The Sunday Times 2016, a One to Watch in The Sunday Times Virgin Fast Track 100, a finalist in the European Business Awards and were recently named the 14th Best Place to Work For by GlassDoor.

About Steve Backshall: Steve Backshall is the author of The Falcon Chronicles, an adventure fiction series for nine to 12 year olds. The Falcon Chronicles follow eco-warriors Saker and Sinter around the globe as they fight to save endangered animals. The latest book in the series, Shark Seas, was published in October 2016. Steve is also one of TV’s busiest presenters, wildlife experts and adventurers. Steve fronts the CBBC Deadly series, travelling the world to film Deadly Pole to Pole, Deadly 60, Live and Deadly, Deadly 360, Deadly on a Mission and his most recent Deadly 60 series, Backshall’s Deadly Adventures. In 2011, Steve won the BAFTA award for best Children's Television Presenter as well as Deadly 60 winning Best Factual series. ω.

Whatever Your Field of Work and Wherever in the World You are, Please, Make a Choice to Do All You Can to Seek and Demand the End of Death Penalty For It is Your Business What is Done in Your Name. The Law That Makes Humans Take Part in Taking Human Lives and That Permits and Kills Human Lives is No Law. It is the Rule of the Jungle Where Law Does Not Exist. The Humanion

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Flipside Green Alphabet Writing Competition 2017 Open for Entries: Deadline July 31


|| June 20: 2017 || ά. Flipside, East Anglia’s literary and arts festival, has launched a writing competition, themed 'environment', aimed at writers of all ages. The Competition is now  open for entries. The competition carries cash prizes and will be judged by leading authors Ms Jackie Kay, the Makar or Poet Laureate of Scotland, Mr Blake Morrison, writer and Professor of Creative and Life Writing at Goldsmiths College and Mr Jon Canter, novelist and playwright.

“We are looking for inspirational writing about the environment.” says Ms Liz Calder, Co-founder of Flipside Festival, which takes place in October: In Snape Maltings: October 06-08 and in Lowestoft: October 24-26. “We hope to encourage writers to think creatively about their surroundings and how to care for them.” Submissions must take any letter of the alphabet and use it in a piece of writing on a green theme, poetry, fiction or non-fiction.

Prose entries should be no more than 500 words and poems no more than 40 lines. Entries could include some visual art. The deadline is July 31, 2017. All entries will be considered for inclusion in a forthcoming anthology.

The competition is split into adults: First prize: £500 and Under 16s: First prize: £200. Full competition details and instructions on how to enter can be found on the Flipside website. ω.

Whatever Your Field of Work and Wherever in the World You are, Please, Make a Choice to Do All You Can to Seek and Demand the End of Death Penalty For It is Your Business What is Done in Your Name. The Law That Makes Humans Take Part in Taking Human Lives and That Permits and Kills Human Lives is No Law. It is the Rule of the Jungle Where Law Does Not Exist. The Humanion

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Once Upon a Time-Future Somewhere in Wales There Would Be People Converging to Tell Tales of Tall and Short for Health: June 15-17

Image: University of South Wales

 

|| June 14: 2017: University of South Wales News || ά. The University of South Wales has joined with health professionals on a project that is attracting worldwide interest. Dr Emily Underwood-Lee, Research Fellow at the University's George Ewart Evans Centre for Storytelling, is working with officials from the Abertawe Bro Morgannwg University Health Board:ABMU on Storytelling for Health. The event will be staged across several venues in Swansea over three days in June and will be the culmination of a series of projects now under way in the city. It will take place on Thursday, Friday and Saturday, June 15-17 and is being supported by an Arts Council of Wales grant and by various sponsors.

Storytelling for Health began as an idea put forward by ABMU arts in health Co-ordinator Prue Thimbleby while Swansea was bidding to become 2017 City of Culture. Dr Emily Underwood-Lee is working with officials from the Abertawe Bro Morgannwg University Health Board:ABMU on Storytelling for Health. Prue said, “Although we didn’t get City of Culture, some of the ideas had built up so much momentum they carried on. This was one of them. That’s where the seed of the idea started and it has grown from there.”

Prue is leading the conference along with Dr Underwood-Lee, as USW is a major partner in the event, as are the University of South Wales Trinity St David’s, Swansea University, Glynn Vivian Art Gallery, the National Waterfront Museum and Volcano Theatre.

Speakers include award-winning Toronto-based storyteller Dan Yashinsky, Mike Wilson, Professor of Drama at Loughborough University who is a leading authority on storytelling and performance and Jac Soarsa, an Artist based in Cardiff, who will exhibit work from her residency in a Singleton Hospital oncology ward.

Also speaking will be leading Welsh storyteller Daniel Morden, who will present a major new work, Stolen. It was inspired by his experiences following treatment for cancer of the jaw, and people he met during his residency in ABMU’s cancer services. He has collaborated on Stolen with musicians Oliver Wilson-Dickson and Sarah Moody.

Meanwhile, three more artist in residency projects are taking place in advance of the conference. Prue, who has an MA in community storytelling, is working with community mental health in Swansea to teach people to become storytellers themselves. Jessica Wilson, a storyteller and experienced forensic mental health nurse, is working with patients and staff on ABMU’s forensic mental health wards so they can set up story groups.

Finally, Steve Killick and Nicola Grove are working with foster care families in the Swansea area. These projects will be showcased during the conference, which will be opened by Baroness Eluned Morgan and Arts Council of Wales Chairman Phil George.

Each morning will start at the National Waterfront Museum with keynote speakers and live music. From 11:00-13:00 and 14:30-16:30 there will be themed sessions at Volcano Theatre in High Street, the Glynn Vivian Art Gallery, and in the Reading Room and the Dynevor lecture theatre at UWTSD.

Sessions will include storytelling in mental health, maternity, end of life, clinical training and much more. There will be a range of performances, workshops and interactive presentations. On Saturday there will also be a designated workshop for children of conference delegates, where they will get to create their own health and wellbeing stories.

ABMU arts in health Co-ordinator Prue Thimbleby said: “I’m passionate about the power of storytelling. Our aim is to acknowledge and celebrate the importance and growth of storytelling for health and to understand and promote good practice and new research. We sent out the call for contributions, and then suddenly I started getting emails from all over the world. People are coming from Europe, South Africa, Australia, the States and Canada. It has created a real buzz. It’s very exciting.”

Dr Underwood-Lee said that she was delighted to be able to work with ABMU on the conference. She added, “It’s great to be able to share work that cuts across disciplines in such exciting ways.

The George Ewart Evans Centre for Storytelling has an established track record of working on innovative storytelling and health projects. My own research within the centre has focused on how women tell stories of both cancer and motherhood.”

For more information on the conference and for ticket booking details visit.
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Whatever Your Field of Work and Wherever in the World You are, Please, Make a Choice to Do All You Can to Seek and Demand the End of Death Penalty For It is Your Business What is Done in Your Name. The Law That Makes Humans Take Part in Taking Human Lives and That Permits and Kills Human Lives is No Law. It is the Rule of the Jungle Where Law Does Not Exist. The Humanion

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Myra Zepf  Appointed as the First Seamus Heaney Children’s Writing Fellow

Image: Queen's University Belfast



|| May 07: 2017: Queen's University Belfast News || ά. County Down based children’s author Ms Myra Zepf has been appointed as the first Children’s Writing Fellow, a prestigious new position created in honour of Seamus Heaney and his contribution to literature. The appointment was announced and welcomed by the Heaney family with Seamus Heaney’s daughter, Ms Catherine Heaney, in attendance. Ms Myra Zepf is a children’s author and journalist. She has published three Irish language books for young audiences and has a number of other projects in production, including picture books in Irish and English and a young adult novel in free-verse.

She was nominated for Children’s Books Ireland Book of the Year in 2016, as well as the Irish Language Reics Carló Award three times. Her picture book ‘Ná Gabh ar Scoil!’, ‘Don’t Go to School!’, has been translated into Korean and English. Myra has extensive experience in delivering children’s writing workshops in Northern Ireland and further afield, regularly working to deliver bespoke reading and writing sessions for school-age audiences. The two-year post has been created by the the Seamus Heaney Centre for Poetry at Queen’s University Belfast and the Arts Council of Northern Ireland.

It is the first appointment of its kind and is one of a number of projects created by the two organisations to ensure the legacy of the Nobel Prize-winning poet and to inspire and support current and future generations of creative writing talent.

Once in post, the Children’s Writing Fellow will perform a range of duties, which promote an interest in reading and writing from an early age by encouraging creativity and engagement with books with children of all ages, from preschoolers, to young adults. Welcoming the creation of the post, Dr Glenn Patterson, Director of the Seamus Heaney Centre for Poetry at Queen’s, said, “The Children’s Writing Fellowship is a tremendously important and exciting, new addition to the Northern Irish literary landscape and in Myra Zepf we have a wonderful and worthy first Children’s Writing Fellow.

I can think of no better way to honour Seamus Heaney contribution to literature than to inspire new generations of readers and writers. The Seamus Heaney Centre looks forward to working with Myra over the next two years in celebrating and encouraging writing for children and by children of all ages.”

Ms Roisin McDonough, Chief Executive of the Arts Council of Northern Ireland, commented, “We are delighted to announce Myra Zepf’s appointment today as the first Children’s Writing Fellow. Working with primary and secondary schools, Myra will embark on a creative journey that will promote reading for pleasure, encouraging children of all ages to discover the joy of books, as well as embarking on their own story-telling adventures.

Seamus Heaney was one of the greatest literary voices of our time and his work is celebrated across the world. The creation of this post is a fitting tribute to his life, work and enduring legacy.”

Commenting on her appointment, Ms Myra Zepf said, “I’m looking forward to tapping into that wonderful energy, that is already there in the world of children’s books, joining dots between organisations and individuals and forging new collaborations.

It will be about shining a spotlight on the talent we already have in the local children’s writing community and inspiring a love of reading and books far and wide. But most importantly of all, it will be about bringing the buzz of the creative process into schools to develop our youngest writers, sparking their imaginations and nurturing their confidence.” ω.

Whatever Your Field of Work and Wherever in the World You are, Please, Make a Choice to Do All You Can to Seek and Demand the End of Death Penalty For It is Your Business What is Done in Your Name. The Law That Makes Humans Take Part in Taking Human Lives and That Permits and Kills Human Lives is No Law. It is the Rule of the Jungle Where Law Does Not Exist. The Humanion

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Surrey New Writers Festival 2017: May 06

Image: University of Essex

|| April 15: 2017: University of Surrey News || ά.  The Surrey New Writers Festival 2017 is taking place on Saturday, May 06. The Festival is an annual public festival affiliated with the Creative Writing programme at the University of Surrey. The organisers aim to create a festival, that will engage with writing and creativity in dynamic ways. The Festival programming is of interest not only to current and potential Surrey students but also to the wider community of Guildford and surrounding areas.

The 2017 Festival events are for the public and will be held at G Live in Guildford. Joining this year's Festival on the day will be award winning author Monica Ali, Surrey’s Distinguished Writer in Residence 2017, who will be delivering a lunchtime lecture to budding writers and Sunday Times bestselling author Elizabeth Noble , who will be joining a panel discussion on the importance of public relations and marketing.

Focussing on the hot topics of the contemporary publishing world the festival will include panel discussions on writing for television, film and the stage, the role of lyric and sound in narrative, how to market oneself and one's work and the importance of genre and labels, with opinions and advice from some of the country’s leading publishing professionals.

The day’s discussions will be followed by an opportunity to meet and mingle with the festival guests and attendees at a Wine and Cheese Reception and an Evening Soiree, which will include literary readings and poetry.

The New Writers Festival is the latest in a series of literary events led by the Creative Writing team at the University of Surrey and aims to open up the sometimes intimidating world of publishing and writing to students, staff and local community alike.

Full details of the event schedule, festival speakers and all panel discussions can be found on surrey.ac.uk/events. This year’s event will once again include the Surrey Poetry Festival, the ‘Poetry Stage’, which will feature a range of special guest poets, performances and readings throughout the day.
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Whatever Your Field of Work and Wherever in the World You are, Please, Make a Choice to Do All You Can to Seek and Demand the End of Death Penalty For It is Your Business What is Done in Your Name. The Law That Makes Humans Take Part in Taking Human Lives and That Permits and Kills Human Lives is No Law. It is the Rule of the Jungle Where Law Does Not Exist. The Humanion

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The 30th Hay Festival 2017: May 25-June 04

At the Hay: Catching up

|| April 04: 2017 || ά. It's the time of the year again to look forward to the Hay Festival, May 25- June 04. Why today, the reader might wonder. Well, because today the organisers of the Festival have launched the programme of the 30th appearance of the Festival. The line-up includes life-changing writers, stars of stage and screen, pioneers of science and technology and future world leaders, who converge for a party of ideas and stories in 800 events. Speakers will include Bernie Sanders, Nemat Shafik, Colm Toíbín, Peter Singer, Neil Gaiman, Elif Shafak, Tracey Emin, Michael Sheen, Brian May, Graham Norton, Elizabeth Strout, Eddie Izzard, Jeanette Winterson, Howard Jacobson, Yanis Varoufakis, Paul Beatty, Carlo Rovelli, Jacqueline Wilson, Judith Kerr, and Chris Riddell.


Highlights from a vibrant strand of science and tech programme include: Helen Czerski on The Physics of Everyday Life; conversation with theoretical physicist Carlo Rovelli; co-founder of Stemettes Anne-Marie Imafidon talks about her award-winning social enterprise, inspiring the next generation of women into Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics careers; Garry Kasparov recounts his Deep Blue battle; mathematical physicist Roger Penrose talks to Marcus du Sautoy; Stephen Fry offers his reformation of the digital sphere; Martin Rees and astronomer Mario Hamuy offering tours of the universe.

And 16 Cambridge University academics take part in the Cambridge Series including: David Tong, Professor of Theoretical Physics, on quantum fields; Magdalena Zernicka-Goetz, Professor of Mammalian Development and Stem Cell Biology on how far science should go to investigate the beginning of life; and Dame Athene Donald, Professor of Experimental Physics and Master of Churchill College, on how gender stereotypes damage innovation.

To read is to be able to imagine the worlds of words made of nothing but joy of pure words. At the Hay reading.

In tech, the Science Museum’s Ben Russell presents their latest robotics exhibitions; computer scientist Marta Kwiatowska discusses when to trust a robot; Beth Singler, Research Associate on the Human Identity in an age of Nearly-Human Machines project, at the Faraday Institute for Science and Religion, will ask if robots feel pain; cyberpsychologist Mary Aiken offers her case for how human behaviour changes online; while Fiona Caldicott, Nick Partridge and Tony Calland talk to Jonathan Montgomery about safety in a big data world. ω.

Whatever Your Field of Work and Wherever in the World You are, Please, Make a Choice to Do All You Can to Seek and Demand the End of Death Penalty For It is Your Business What is Done in Your Name. The Law That Makes Humans Take Part in Taking Human Lives and That Permits and Kills Human Lives is No Law. It is the Rule of the Jungle Where Law Does Not Exist. The Humanion

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New Seamus Heaney Children’s Writing Fellowship Announced

Seamus Heaney HomePlace

|| March 23: 2017: Queen's University Belfast News || ά. A new Children’s Writing Fellow is to be appointed by the Arts Council of Northern Ireland and the Seamus Heaney Centre for Poetry at Queen’s University Belfast in memory of Seamus Heaney and his contribution to literature. Developed by the Arts Council of Northern Ireland and Queen’s University Belfast and supported by National Lottery funding, this is one of a number of projects created to ensure the legacy of Seamus Heaney and to inspire and support current and future generations of creative writing talent.

Expressions of interest were invited for the two year, part-time post, which will attract a remuneration package of £15,000 per annum. Details of the appointment will be announced in April. Once in post, the Children’s Writing Fellow will perform a range of duties, which promote an interest in reading and writing from an early age by encouraging creativity and engagement with books. Dr Damian Smyth, Head of Literature at the Arts Council of Northern Ireland, commented, “Seamus Heaney was one of the greatest literary voices of our time. He brought poetry back to the people, writing about real human issues in his own inimitable style.

“This prestigious new position will be awarded in the spirit of his work, which illuminated so many lives. The Children’s Writing Fellow will be instrumental in promoting creativity and reading for pleasure. Working with primary and secondary schools, they will encourage children of all ages to take joy in books and literature in all its many forms.”

The Fellow will be based in the Seamus Heaney Centre at Queen’s. Professor Fran Brearton, School of Arts, English and Languages, Queen’s University Belfast, said, “When we established the Seamus Heaney Centre for Poetry here at Queen’s, one of Heaney’s requests was that it had a commitment to bringing forward young people. Through the Heaney Legacy project, we have already been able to support young people studying literature at the Centre.

We’re thrilled that the new Children’s Writing Fellowship gives us the opportunity to make more connections with schools and arts groups working with children, to develop an appreciation and understanding of literature in younger readers and future writers.”
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Whatever Your Field of Work and Wherever in the World You are, Please, Make a Choice to Do All You Can to Seek and Demand the End of Death Penalty For It is Your Business What is Done in Your Name. The Law That Makes Humans Take Part in Taking Human Lives and That Permits and Kills Human Lives is No Law. It is the Rule of the Jungle Where Law Does Not Exist. The Humanion

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University of Manchester  Centre for New Writing Prepares the Ground for Its Tenth Anniversary

Image: University of Manchester

|| March 17: University of Manchester News 2017 || ά. The Centre for New Writing, based within the School of Arts, Languages and Cultures at the University of Manchester, is set to welcome three successful and dynamic new writers to its team in its tenth anniversary year. Kamila Shamsie is the internationally-renowned Author of six novels, including Kartography, 2002, Burnt Shadows, 2009, which was shortlisted for the Orange Prize, and A God in Every Stone, 2014, which was shortlisted for numerous prizes, including the Baileys Prize. She is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature, a Patron of the Manchester Literature Festival and in 2013 was named one of Granta’s ‘Best Young British Novelists’.

Will Boast was born in England and grew up in Ireland and Wisconsin. His story collection, Power Ballads, won the 2011 Iowa Short Fiction Award and his New York Times bestselling memoir, Epilogue, was a BBC Radio 4 Book of the Week in 2015; he has also published articles and fiction in Virginia Quarterly Review, the American Scholar and the New York Times. Honor Gavin takes a multi-platform approach to the creative and the critical, involving music, performance and collaborations with groups such as Theatrum Mundi. She is the Author of a monograph on modernist literature and film and of an exuberant, experimental novel, Midland, 2014, which was shortlisted for the Gordon Burn Prize.

The Centre has, also, announced the permanent appointment of its Professor of Creative Writing, Jeanette Winterson, whose lively presence has done so much to inspire the students and shape the character of the centre in recent years.

“2017 marks ten years of the Centre for New Writing, so we’re delighted that the University of Manchester is continuing to invest in creative writing.” said Kaye Mitchell and John McAuliffe, Co-directors of the Centre. “Our new writers will complement and strengthen our existing team of lecturers.

We are organising other new projects and planning on working with many more new bright prospects over the next decade. CNW brings together writers who excel in a range of different kinds of fiction, poetry and screenwriting, bringing their individual talents to bear on the work of all of our students.” said Professor of Creative Writing Jeanette Winterson.
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Whatever Your Field of Work and Wherever in the World You are, Please, Make a Choice to Do All You Can to Seek and Demand the End of Death Penalty For It is Your Business What is Done in Your Name. The Law That Makes Humans Take Part in Taking Human Lives and That Permits and Kills Human Lives is No Law. It is the Rule of the Jungle Where Law Does Not Exist. The Humanion

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Now, Here's a Prize for Camille Whitcher and Here's a Prize for Rachel Stubbs: One Tells Her Story in Words as the Other Paints Hers with Colours

 

|| February 20: Anglia Ruskin University News 2017 || ά. Anglia Ruskin University graduate Camille Whitcher has won the prestigious Salariya Book Prize at the Stratford Literary Festival with her magical tale, Moon Rabbit, based on a Far East folk legend. Camille will have her book published by Salariya imprint, Scribblers and will receive a £5,000 advance against royalties from Salariya and advice from leading illustration agent, Jodie Hodges of United Agents.

A 2016 graduate from the MA Children’s Book Illustration course at Anglia Ruskin’s Cambridge School of Art, Camille’s work was inspired by her Japanese mother. Camille said, “She told me about Otsukimi, moon-viewing festival, which honours the autumn moon and how people ‘offer’ food to the moon. She wasn’t sure about whether this involved any rabbits but as a rabbit lover myself, I had to put them together into a story!” The competition was open to debut writers and illustrators and was judged by a panel including Ashley King of Waterstones and Tereze Brikmane of the children’s bookshop Tales on Moon Lane.

Illustrator Sarah McIntyre, who was also on the judging panel, said, “Camille Whitcher is a very deserving winner of the Stratford-Salariya Picture Book prize. All the best bedtime stories end with the character’s own bedtime and this one is no exception!

I was won over by the enchanting illustrations, the rhythm of the storytelling and the dream-like quality of the narrative. I’m very much looking forward to introducing this fantastic picture book to our readers.”

The shortlist for the prize also included current MA students Josephine Birch and Rachel Quarry. Camille's Moon Rabbit will be published later this year. Meanwhile MA Children’s Book Illustration student Rachel Stubbs has won this year’s Sebastian Walker Award for Illustration, along with a cheque for £500.

Established in 2011 in honour of Walker Books’ founder Sebastian Walker, the award celebrates new talent in children’s illustration and is run in collaboration with the MA in Children’s Book Illustration course at Anglia Ruskin.

Martin Salisbury, Professor of Illustration and Course Leader for the MA Children’s Book Illustration, said, ''The Sebastian Walker Award is a great inspiration for our students. Seeing so many graduates of the MA course and not just winners of the award, published by Walker gives encouragement to everyone. We are indebted to Walker for their continuing support.”
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Whatever Your Field of Work and Wherever in the World You are, Please, Make a Choice to Do All You Can to Seek and Demand the End of Death Penalty For It is Your Business What is Done in Your Name. The Law That Makes Humans Take Part in Taking Human Lives and That Permits and Kills Human Lives is No Law. It is the Rule of the Jungle Where Law Does Not Exist. The Humanion

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The Dundee International Book Prize 2017 Open for Submissions for Debut Novels: Deadline: March 13

 

|| January 30: 2016: University of Dundee News|| ά. The prestigious Dundee International Book Prize will open for unpublished authors to polish their manuscripts and stake their claim for £5,000 and a publishing deal with Freight Books. Submissions are being sought for the 2017 award from Monday, today, January 30. The prize also offers a week of protected writing time in the City of Discovery as well as the coveted publishing contract and cash prize.

Writers with a spellbinding, unpublished novel have until midnight on Monday, March 13 to enter the competition, which attracts hundreds of entries every year. All will be read before a shortlist is drawn up later in the year. The judging panel will then debate the merits of the finalists before the winner is announced at the Dundee Literary Festival in October. The competition is a joint venture between the 'Dundee, One City, Many Discoveries' campaign and Literary Dundee, which is part of the University of Dundee and is in place to celebrate readers and writers, and bring the very best writers in the world to the city.

Peggy Hughes of Literary Dundee, said, “Our calendar year gets started in earnest when submissions open for the Dundee International Book Prize. Reading new, unpublished fiction by authors from all over the world is a privilege and I can't wait to see what people send to us this year.”

Will Dawson convener of Dundee City Council's city development committee said, “Many writers will be looking forward to this announcement so that they can enter their creations into this prestigious competition. Our city enjoys a packed calendar of literary events and the Book Prize remains a real highlight. I never envy the judges their task as the quality of entries is so high.”

It is open to authors from around the world, and twelve writers have won the Prize since its inception in 2000. Last year’s winner was Jessica Thummel with ‘The Cure for Lonely’, a coming-of-age story of Sam Gavin, a transman who moves from Kansas to San Francisco in the summer of 1989. It will be published later this year.

Over the years, several finalists have also gone on to gain publishing details thanks to the profile the Prize offered them, demonstrating the strength of the competition. This year, made possible with kind support from the Bridge Awards, the organisers have produced a series of short videos offering practical writing advice from established authors including novelists Kevin MacNeil, Karen Campbell and J David Simons. These will be available from Tuesday,  January 31 here.

Adrian Searle of Freight Books said, ‘‘It’s such a pleasure and privilege to be involved in the Dundee International Book Prize, an amazing boon for emerging writers. It has established itself as one of the foremost literary awards of its type internationally and we fully expect to see another bumper crop of manuscripts this year.”

There is no minimum or maximum length to the manuscript but it must be the author's debut novel. More information about the Prize, including a full set of rules and details about how to submit an entry can be found here.

The closing date is March 13, 2017. The winner will be informed of their success in July and the winner will be announced at the Dundee Literary Festival in October.
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Whatever Your Field of Work and Wherever in the World You are, Please, Make a Choice to Do All You Can to Seek and Demand the End of Death Penalty For It is Your Business What is Done in Your Name. The Law That Makes Humans Take Part in Taking Human Lives and That Permits and Kills Human Lives is No Law. It is the Rule of the Jungle Where Law Does Not Exist. The Humanion

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Mind the Publisher's Name: OneWorld: Mind the Name Paul Beatty Who Won't Sellout But Question and If He Gets the Man Booker Prize Than It is an Invite for Readers to Read Him and Raise Questions, Too: Why are We Not One World: Why are We Not One Humanity

|| October 29: 2016 || ά. The Sellout by Paul Beatty was named winner of the 2016 Man Booker Prize for Fiction at the weekend. The Sellout is published by small independent publisher Oneworld, who had their first win in 2015 with Marlon James’ A Brief History of Seven Killings. Mind the Publisher's Name: OneWorld: Mind the name Paul Beatty who won't Sellout but question and, if he gets the Man Booker Prize than it is an invite for Readers to read him and raise Questions, too: Why are we not One World: Why are we not One Humanity. You might think, The Humanion is late reporting this news, but The Humanion can only run by its own clock that has its own circadian rhythm and despite the fact that, by the time you are reading this, the Summer Time has shifted back an hour to become Winter Time, and according this rhythm The Humanion does things as it does. Bear with us. Rushing we do not do. But reading must we do.

The 54-year-old New York resident, born in Los Angeles, is the first American author to win the prize in its 48-year history. US authors became eligible in 2014. The 2016 shortlist included two British, two US, one Canadian and one British-Canadian writer. The Sellout is a searing satire on race relations in contemporary America. The Sellout is described by The New York Times as a ‘metaphorical multicultural pot almost too hot to touch’, whilst the Wall Street Journal called it a ‘Swiftian satire of the highest order. Like someone shouting fire in a crowded theatre, Mr. Beatty has whispered “Racism” in a postracial world.’ The book is narrated by African-American ‘Bonbon’, a resident of the run-down town of Dickens in Los Angeles county, which has been removed from the map to save California from embarrassment.

Bonbon is being tried in the Supreme Court for attempting to reinstitute slavery and segregation in the local high school as means of bringing about civic order. What follows is a retrospective of this whirlwind scheme, populated by cartoonish characters who serve to parody racial stereotypes. The framework of institutional racism and the unjust shooting of Bonbon’s father at the hands of police are particularly topical. Amanda Foreman, 2016 Chair of judges, comments: ‘The Sellout is a novel for our times. A tirelessly inventive modern satire, its humour disguises a radical seriousness. Paul Beatty slays sacred cows with abandon and takes aim at racial and political taboos with wit, verve and a snarl.’

Though Beatty cites satirists Joseph Heller and Kurt Vonnegut as formative influences, he remarked to The Paris Review that he was ‘surprised that everybody keeps calling this a comic novel… I’m not sure how I define it.’ This is the second consecutive Man Booker Prize success for independent publisher Oneworld, following Marlon James’ win with A Brief History of Seven Killings in 2015.

Amanda Foreman was joined on the 2016 panel of judges by Jon Day, Abdulrazak Gurnah, David Harsent and Olivia Williams. The judges considered 155 books for this year’s prize, including a total of 11 call-ins. In addition to his £50,000 prize and trophy, Beatty also receives a designer bound edition of his book and a further £2,500 for being shortlisted.

On winning the Man Booker Prize, an author can expect international recognition, plus a dramatic increase in book sales. Last year’s winning novel, A Brief History of Seven Killings by Marlon James, has gone on to sell over 360,000 copies in the UK and Commonwealth, as well as 120,000 in the US. When accepting his prize, James said, ‘I just met Ben Okri and it just reminded me of how much of my literary sensibilities were shaped by the Man Booker Prize… It suddenly increases your library by 13 books.’

Other recent winners have included Hilary Mantel, 2012 and 2009, whose Wolf Hall and Bring Up the Bodies have led to award-winning adaptations on stage and screen, and Julian Barnes, 2011, whose The Sense of an Ending will soon be adapted for film. Other winning novels that have gone on to have second or third lives on stage and screen include Schindler’s Ark, directed by Steven Spielberg as Schindler’s List, The Remains of the Day and The English Patient.

This is the third year that the prize has been open to writers of any nationality, writing originally in English and published in the UK. Previously, the prize was open only to authors from the UK & Commonwealth, Republic of Ireland and Zimbabwe. The 2016 shortlist included two British, two US, one Canadian and one British-Canadian writer.


First awarded in 1969, the Man Booker Prize is recognised as the leading award for high quality literary fiction written in English. Its list of winners features many of the giants of the last four decades: from Salman Rushdie to Margaret Atwood, Iris Murdoch to JM Coetzee.

Paul Beatty’s win was announced by Amanda Foreman at a black-tie dinner at London’s Guildhall, where he was presented with a trophy from HRH The Duchess of Cornwall and a £50,000 cheque from Luke Ellis, Chief Executive of Man Group. Guests at the event, which was broadcast live on the BBC News Channel, included the shortlisted authors, well-known figures from the literary world and VIPs including AS Byatt, Ben Okri, Karen Bradley, John Hurt and Fiona Shaw. Man Group has sponsored the prize since 2002. One of the world’s largest independent alternative investment managers, Man Group is a partner that mirrors the quality, integrity and longevity of the prize.

Three years after the Man Booker Prize was opened up to all novels written in English and published in the UK , regardless of whether they were British, Irish, Commonwealth or from, say, Micronesia, the Americans finally have a winner: Paul Beatty with The Sellout. The swamping of the prize by the big names of US fiction confidently predicted by assorted naysayers has yet to occur (there were only two Americans on the shortlist of six) but rather Beatty has shown himself to be a very Man Booker kind of writer, unshowy, arriving with acclaim but without fanfare but with a quality, originality and moral seriousness that is unmistakable.

Few people saw his win coming. Although Beatty, pronounced Batey, like Warren, has received numerous positive reviews, admiring comment and the National Book Critics Circle Award for Fiction in America the bookies nevertheless had him with middling odds, perhaps feeling that his satire of race relations set in near future Los Angeles might be too just American and too political. Not so, said Amanda Foreman, chair of the judges. The Sellout, she proclaimed, was simply ‘the best book of 2016’. When asked what ‘best’ meant she defined it as a combination of attributes: ‘Aesthetic, quality and depth of ideas, craftsmanship of writing, and whether the novel transports the reader.’

The judges met for four hours to thrash out such attributes with, apparently, three of the shortlisted books in particular deserving of extra consideration. The decision, however, was unanimous. There were no disagreements just passionate argument: ‘The Man Booker,’ Foreman noted, ‘is only as good as the commitment of its judges.’

Beatty is the second black writer in a row, after Marlon James, to win the prize and his book, which deals in part with modern slavery, seems especially pertinent in the age of the Black Lives Matter movement. Politics was not though a part of the judges’ thinking. The novel was written before the current state of race relations in America became quite so parlous and, said Foreman, it is timely not because of the recent flashpoints or because the prize announcement comes two weeks before the US election but ‘because of the way it deals with social problems’. And although Foreman lived in America for many years she and the judges felt the book transcends nationality.

The Sellout, in her words, is ‘one of those rare books able to take satire, itself a very difficult form, and use it to plunge into the heart of American society’. Beatty himself she likens to Swift and Twain in his ability to ‘eviscerate every sacred cow of society and to do so in a way that makes the reader laugh but is also painful’. Full marks too to Foreman for not once using the word ‘dystopia’.

The book centres on an African-American man, Bonbon, the sellout of the title, on trial for trying to reinstitute slavery and segregation in a run-down district of LA in an attempt at regaining civic order. Race is a dangerous word and, as Foreman acknowledged, ‘the truth is rarely pretty’ but what makes Beatty’s treatment of this intractable problem so special, she says, is that ‘he nails the reader to the cross and while you are being nailed you are being tickled’. Beatty is not a shouty writer but one ‘revelling in the power of their own writing and as a result the novel is a first class piece of literary fiction wrapped up in a shawl of humour’, Foreman showing her own literary credentials here with her imagery. Beatty has professed himself ‘surprised that everybody keeps calling The Sellout a comic novel’.

The Sellout is 54-year-old Beatty’s fourth novel and he also written two books of poetry. So the prize goes to an established and wide-ranging writer who has learnt his craft. What his previous experience won’t have taught him though is how to deal with the fame that comes with winning the prize. His name, for example, will feature on a Royal Mail postmark that will be stamped on millions of letters in the next few days. Not many Americans, not many living writers, can claim such distinction.

Beatty’s win is also a remarkable triumph for the book’s publisher, Oneworld. A small independent in a world of publishing conglomerates, this is Oneworld’s second MB win on the trot, they are Marlon James’s publisher, too. James’s A Brief History of Seven Killings has gone on to sell nearly half a million copies in the UK and US alone. How America will react to the coronation of this uncomfortable look at what’s been swept under its carpets will be one of the many fascinations around Beatty and his book in the year to come.

And, a book, until, you, the Reader, has read it, forever remains open as an invitation and new for you. It does not matter when or where or why or how long ago it has been published. It never does or will get old for you, the Reader, until you have read it. So, go out and get a copy and start reading and do not forget to question: why and why not and how and however not and where and wherefore and why and whither and what if....Congratulation to Paul Beatty. The Humanion wishes him all the best and hopes that he will carry on questioning as he travels on the road of a world made of the highest of humanity: imagination. ω.

Images: Man Booker Prize

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The Dundee Literary Festival 2016: October 19-23


|| October 16: 2016 || ά. Language, how it brings people together, and what it might look like in the future will be explored at this year’s Dundee Literary Festival, taking place in October 19-23 with additional events and activities on November 25. There will be several events during the festival’s run that shows the strength of bringing different countries and cultures together.

‘Sunlight and Shadows’ will see Panopticon author Jenni Fagan, South Korean author Hwang Jungeun and Man Booker International Prize-winning translator Deborah Smith discuss the creation of vivid award-winning words. This will take place at the Bonar Hall on Wednesday, October 19 at 18:00.

On Friday, October 21, Gaelic and Scots will unite in science fiction in a world first, as Matthew Fitt revisits his cyberpunk Scots classic, But n Ben A-Go-Go, and Tim Armstrong takes Gaelic where it has never ventured before in his space opera, Air Cuan Dubh Drilseach, On a Glittering Black Sea. Both novels raise timely questions about how we communicate with the world and with ourselves.

Also on Friday, October 21, Susana Moreira Marques from Portugal shares her illuminating reflection on death and dying, Now and at the Hour of our Death, while Saturday, October 22 brings Eric Ngalle Charles, who came to Cardiff in 1999 on a Zimbabwean passport after being illegally trafficked into Russia while fleeing persecution.

Peggy Hughes, Programme Manager of the Dundee Literary Festival, said, “Translation allows literature to travel and brings global stories to new readers. “In this our tenth birthday year we really wanted to highlight stories from across the globe, as well as from right here in Dundee, and to introduce people to a whole host of different voices, cultures and ideas.”

This year it will feature X-Men and Goldeneye star Alan Cumming, singer-songwriter Roddy Woomble and former Makar Liz Lochhead.

For the full programme and to purchase tickets visit.

Dundee Literary Festival is produced by Literary Dundee and is a University of Dundee-led initiative that connects books, readers, writers and the brightest ideas, thanks to the University of Dundee and partners throughout the city and beyond.
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Blenheim Palace Literature Festival 2016: October 13-16


|| October 14: 2016 || ά.  One of the highlights of the autumn literary season, the boutique Blenheim Palace Festival of Literature, Film and Music has returned to the stunning grounds of Blenheim Palace from Thursday, October 13 to Sunday, October 16 with an exciting programme of events, discussions and debates.

Revealing a star-studded line up for 2016, the festival features renowned speakers from the fields of music, food, fashion, literature and film during the four-day event in Oxfordshire. All tickets for the main festival events include entry to Blenheim Palace’s magnificent gardens and grounds on the day of the event.

Arguably the greatest English ballerina of all time Darcey Bussell will speak about her life and career onstage and life after retirement as a judge for BBC Strictly Come Dancing. Bussell performed in major classical ballet roles after becoming principal dancer of Sadler’s Wells Royal Ballet at the age of 20 and performed with the world’s leading ballet companies.

Renowned perfumer and businesswoman Jo Malone will speak with internationally acclaimed Chinese chef, food writer and television presenter Ken Hom about the significance of smell, taste and food in their lives, and recount their stories of the rise from modest beginnings to international fame. Justine Picardie, editor of Harper’s Bazaar, novelist and biographer, will reflect on the 1950s when Christian Dior brought his glamorous fashion house to Blenheim Palace and its recent return to Blenheim Palace as the setting for the Spring:Summer 2017 cruise collection.

Geographer, explorer and presenter of BBC television series Coast Nicholas Crane will look at the evolution of the British landscape and its future whilst wildlife expert, photographer and presenter of BBC Springwatch and Autumnwatch Simon King will explain what to look out for when trying spot wildlife in the British countryside. Other names already confirmed for this year’s line-up include Richard E Grant, Nicholas Parsons, and Jacqui Dankworth.

Festival director Sally Dunsmore said, “We are delighted to announce the high-quality speakers that promise some fantastic discussion and great entertainment at this year’s Blenheim Palace Festival of Literature, Film and Music.  “We have 40 events over 4 days, and we’ve packed in something for everyone, whether you are interested in literature, history, religion, politics, the stage, film, television, music, the natural world, your kitchen or your garden.”

Tickets are currently on sale for these events and booking is now open, on 0333 666 3366 or in person at Oxford Visitor Information Centre, Broad Street, Oxford.

Blenheim Palace: Blenheim Palace is the home of the 12th Duke and Duchess of Marlborough and the birthplace of Sir Winston Churchill. This masterpiece of 18th century baroque architecture boasts over 300 years of history and is a World Heritage Site, surrounded by more than 2000 acres of ‘Capability’ Brown landscaped parkland and formal gardens. Blenheim Palace is a living and changing experience with a wealth of events, themed tours and exhibitions throughout the year.
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Read as You Imagine for Words Must Be Brought to Life by the Reader's Imagination

Many years later, as he faced the firing squad, Colonel Aureliano Buendia was to remember that distant afternoon when his father took him to discover ice. At that time Macondo was a village of twenty adobe houses, built on the bank of a river of clear water that ran along a bed of polished stones, which were white and enormous, like prehistoric eggs. The world was so recent that many things lacked names, and in order to indicate them it was necessary to point. One Hundred Years of Solitude : Gabriel Garcia Marquez: Translation : Gregory Rabassa

He was an old man who fished alone in a skiff in the Gulf Stream and he had gone eighty-four days now without taking a fish. In the first forty days a boy had been with him. But after forty days without fish the boy's parents had told him that the old man was now definitely and finally salao, which is the worst form of unlucky, and the boy had gone at their orders in another boat which caught three good fish the first week. The Old Man and the Sea : Ernest Hemingway

Sth, I know that woman. She used to live with a flock of birds on Lenox Avenue. Know her husband, too. He fell for an eighteen-year-old girl with one of those deepdown, spooky loves that made him so sad and happy he shot her just to keep the feeling going. When the woman, her name is Violet, went to the funeral to see the girl and to cut her dead face they threw her to the floor and out of the church. Jazz : Toni Morisson

On an evening in the later part of May a middle-aged man was walking homeward from Shaston to the village of Marlott, in the adjoining Vale of Blackmore  or Blackmoor. The pair of legs that carried him were rickety, and there was a bias in his gait which inclined him somewhat to the left of a straight line. He Occasionally gave a smart nod, as if in confirmation of some opinion, though he was not thinking of anything in particular. Tess of the d'Urbervilles : Thomas Hardy

1801- I have just returned from a visit to my landlord- the solitary neighbour that I shall be troubled with. This is certainly, a beautiful country! In all England, I do not believe that I could have fixed on a situation so completely removed from the stir of society. A perfect misanthropist's Heaven-and Mr Heathcliff and I are such a suitable pair to divide the desolation between us. Wuthering Heights : Emily Bronté

We all seek an ideal in life. A pleasant fancy began to visit me in a certain year, that perhaps the number of human beings is few who do not find their quest at some era of life for some space more or less brief. I had certainly found mine in youth, though the strong belief I held of its existence sufficed through all my brightest and freshest time to keep me hopeful. I had not found it in maturity. I was become resigned never to find it. I had lived certain dim years entirely tranquil and unexpectant. And now I was not sure but something was hovering around my hearth which pleased me wonderfully. Emma Brown: Charlotte Bronté: Clare Boylan.

''Eh bien, mon prince, ............So spoke, in July 1805, the renowned Anna Pavlovna Scherer, maid of honour and intimate of the empress Maria Feodorovna, greeting the important and high-ranking Prince Vassily, the first to arrive at her soiree. Anna Pavlovna had been coughing for several days. War and Peace : Leo Tolstoy:Translation: Larissa Volokhonsky and Richard Pevear

It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife.

However, little known the feelings or views of such a man may be on his first entering a neighbourhood, this truth is so well fixed in the minds of the surrounding families, that he is considered as the rightful property of some one or other of their daughters. Pride and Prejudice: Jane Austin

Emma Woodhouse, handsome, clever, and rich, with a comfortable home and happy disposition, seemed to unite some of the best blessings of existence; and lived nearly twenty-one years in the world with very little to distress or vex her. Emma: Jane Austin

Thirty years ago, Marseilles lay burning in the sun, one day.

A blazing sun upon a fierce August day was no greater rarity in southern France then, than at any other time, before or since. Everything in Marseilles, and about Marseilles, had stared at the fervid sky, and been stared at in return, until a staring habit had become universal there. Little Dorrit : Charles Dickens

Alexei Fyodorvich Karamazov was the third son of a landowner from our district, Fyodor Pavlovich Karamazov, well known in his own day,and still remembered among us, because of his dark and tragic death, which happened exactly thirteen years ago and which I shall speak of in its proper place. The Brothers Karamazov : Fyodor Dostoevsky: Translation : Larissa Volokhonsky and Richard Pevear

Okonokwo was well known throughout the nine villages and even beyond. His fame rested on solid personal achievements. As a young man of eighteen he had brought honour to his village by throwing Amalinze the Cat. Amalinze was the great wrestler who for seven years was unbeaten, from Umuofia to Mbaino. Things Fall Apart : Chinua Achebe.

As we all know, the Lord is almighty-he knows all and sees far. And so, one day, he let a forest fire burn a good swath of state land, laying waste to acres of the dry, pine forest around the town of Joensuu. The people did everything in their power to put a stop to his work, as they always did, but he burned the forest undeterred, just as far as it suited him. He had his own plan.

A certain Colonel was the first to appreciate just how far the Almighty's gaze had extended. Unknown Soldier: Väinö Linna:Translation: Liesl Yamaguchi

To the red country and part of the grey country of Oklahoma the last rains came gently, and they did not cut the scarred earth. The ploughs crossed and recrossed the rivulet marks. The last rains lifted the corn quickly and scattered weed colonies and grass along the sides of the roads so that the grey country and the dark red country began to disappear under a green cover. The Grapes of Wrath : John Steinbeck

Granted: I am an inmate of a mental hospital; my keeper is watching me, he never lets met out of his sight; there's a peephole in the door, and my keeper's eye is the shade of brown that can never see through a blue-eyed type like me.

So you see, my keeper can't be my enemy. I've come to be very fond of him; when he stops looking at me from behind the door and comes into the room, I tell him incidents from my life, so he can get to know me in spite of the peephole between us. The Tin Drum : Günter Grass: Translation : Ralph Manheim

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Cheltenham Literature Festival 2016: October 07-16


|| September 27: 2016 || ά. This year's Cheltenham Literature Festival taking place in October 07-16 and the Festival programme is bursting with unique events and appearances, benefitting once again by coming amid the party conference season and just ahead of Super Thursday, the UK’s biggest day for book publishing, with many of this year’s Christmas bestseller contenders kicking off their campaigns from the site.

Speakers appearing include: American Ambassador Matthew Barzun, Oliver Stone, Karl Ove Knausgaard, Ian McEwan, Alan Cumming, Cheryl Strayed, PJ O’Rourke, Lionel Shriver, Jonathan Safran Foer, Teju Cole, Michael Connelly, Ed Balls, Ken Clarke, Graham Swift, Sebastian Faulks, Edna O’Brien, Clare Balding, Jilly Cooper, Armando Iannucci, Wilko Johnson, Simon Armitage, Joe Wicks, Deliciously Ella, Joey Barton, Vivienne Westwood, Chris Riddell, Dame Jacqueline Wilson, Chris Hadfield, Alan Carr, Sara Pascoe, Alexei Sayle, and illusionist Derren Brown.

A vibrant spa town with Regency architecture, broad avenues and a bustling high street, Cheltenham sits in an area of outstanding natural beauty on the edge of the Cotswolds: a vision of English calm with an impressive range of shops, hotels, restaurants, theatres and bars. Opened by Sir Ralph Richardson on October 03 1949, the festival was the first of its kind in Britain. This year’s festival brings things right up to the present, with a new strand of events aimed at millennials and a celebration of the US election year and the 70th anniversary of the Special Relationship, with a major series of events debating the culture, writing and politics of the US.

Perfect for families who love reading, writing and having fun, as well, the whole festival is located in a bespoke tented village in the centre of town which comes complete with family spaces The Little Big Top and Waterstones Children’s Hideaway. The Book It! children’s and young reader’s programme boasts an exciting additional line-up of children’s authors and events.

The Times and The Sunday Times Cheltenham Literature Festival Programme

Lionel Shriver:L:Image: Sarah Lee. Nick Clegg

American Ambassador Matthew Barzun, Oliver Stone, Karl Ove Knausgaard, Ian McEwan, Alan Cumming, Cheryl Strayed, PJ O’Rourke, Lionel Shriver, Jonathan Safran Foer, Teju Cole, Michael Connelly, Ed Balls, Ken Clarke, Graham Swift, Sebastian Faulks, Edna O’Brien, Clare Balding, Jilly Cooper, Armando Iannucci, Wilko Johnson, Simon Armitage, Joe Wicks, Deliciously Ella, Joey Barton, Vivienne Westwood, Chris Riddell, Dame Jacqueline Wilson and Chris Hadfield to headline. Plus: comedians Alan Carr, Sara Pascoe and Alexei Sayle, and illusionist Derren Brown

A dazzling array of prize-winning novelists, agenda-setters and opinion-formers, historians, filmmakers, artists, academics, journalists , poets, musicians and comedians will come together in celebration of the spoken and written word this October (7-16) for the 67th The Times and The Sunday Times Cheltenham Literature Festival.

The programme embodies Cheltenham’s spirit of enquiry featuring some of the world’s most exciting thinkers and commentators, debating the most pertinent issues of our times. Variety is also the order of the day with literary greats rubbing shoulders with fresh new voices, established leaders with Youtube stars, across more than 600 events covering disciplines as diverse as history, politics, film, sport, food, art, fashion, nature, technology and business.

On the eve of the US Election, the Festival turns its gaze on America for one of its two main themes. America Uncovered will examine the fascinating culture, literature, politics and enormous global influence at this pivotal moment in the country’s history. The second major strand, Millennial Lives, spotlights the issues closest to, and most affecting, Generation Y, from the impacts of the latest technology, to the ideas gaining most traction in this rising demographic – plus the wider implications of how we live now.

Baroness Gail Rebuck, Chair of The Times and The Sunday Times Cheltenham Literature Festival, said: "Cheltenham Literature Festival 2016 will be the most exciting place to hear writers, politicians, academics and journalists explore new ways of seeing the world. Wide-ranging debates will be scheduled alongside unique opportunities to hear literary greats discuss their work, both past and present.

"There will also be a chance to meet some of the leading figures in film, art, design and food, while also discovering fresh literary voices. And Cheltenham, Britain’s oldest literature festival, will also showcase millennial talent from bloggers to spoken word poets, offering up yet another year of inspired curation and intellectual challenge."

John Witherow, Editor of The Times said: "The Times and The Sunday Times Cheltenham Literature Festival is a high point on our editorial calendars. We are proud of our association with such a stellar literary event, as you can see from the number of our journalists who flock to the festival each Autumn."

There are six Guest Curators this year bringing their experience and insight to bear on the Festival’s themes. American writer and critic and former editor of Granta Magazine John Freeman; Professor of American Literature Sarah Churchwell; and comedian Reginald D Hunter celebrate new voices and established greats in the ‘America Uncovered’ strand; while Rapper, Poet and Academic Akala; Girl Lost in the City’ blogger Emma Gannon and writer and performer Cecilia Knapp delve into new ways of seeing the world in ‘Millennial lives’.

From stage and screen, multi-award winning director Oliver Stone flies into Cheltenham to discuss film-making with Mark Lawson for his first UK literary festival appearance; Cheryl Strayed talks about her best-selling memoir Wild, the subject of a film starring Reese Witherspoon; Emma Freud meets film and television star Alan Cumming:The Good Wife; while prolific television writer Andrew Davies:War and Peace, Middlemarch, Pride and Prejudice; talks about his extraordinary career; and legendary Dr Feelgood founder Wilko Johnson explains how he defied death after being given 10 months to live, accompanied by his favourite musical tracks.

To balance the serious discussions, a rich strand of comedy, performance poetry, food and music will fill venues across the festival site. The festival plays host to world renowned Chefs Marcus Wareing, and Antonio Carluccio, healthy-eating sensations Joe Wicks and Deliciously Ella Mills and back by popular demand, Marcus Brigstocke who will host special guests including comedian Sara Pascoe for his Big Sunday Brunch. Other entertainment comes in the form of Derren Brown who teaches us how to be happy; punk queen Vivienne Westwood on fashion and climate change; and treasured comedian Alan Carr who tells all. There are special screenings of American classic films; performance poetry; a celebration of Dorothy Parker; counter-culture poet Charles Bukowski remembered in the Festival Lates strand and so much more..

The hugely popular family programme returns, offering over 90 events and workshops led by some of the biggest names in children’s writing including Frances Hardinge, Children’s Laureates past and present Dame Jacqueline Wilson, Chris Riddell and Michael Rosen, comedians and writers Julian Clary and David Baddiel, plus Clare Balding introducing her first children’s book. There are birthday celebrations for two giants of the children’s book world - Roald Dahl and Beatrix Potter, along with appearances from Picture Book makers Chris Haughton, Benji Davies and Rob Biddulph, and a rare festival appearance from astronaut Chris Hadfield who launches his new book and shares his passion for space travel. Meanwhile, YA fans can enjoy the leading voices from the genre, including Marcus Sedgwick, Holly Bourne, Holly Smale and CJ Daugherty and mystery writer Robin Stevens.

Beyond the main stages is a whole host of activities for all ages to discover and enjoy, from locally sourced food and drink, creative writing workshops and masterclasses extending …around town with pop-up performances in the streets and Cheltenham’s very own Lit Crawl, imported from San Francisco’s Litquake Festival. And there are Festival Lates! on site providing deliciously edgy performances.

America Uncovered

In this presidential election year, as the world’s eyes turn to America, Cheltenham looks deeper into the culture as well as the politics of our friends across the pond. Cheltenham Festivals is delighted to announce that the American Ambassador, Matthew Barzun, will be attending.

The Sunday Times hosts a special election review while The Times debates the special relationship between the UK and the US, chaired by Justin Webb and featuring Steve Erlanger, The New York Times bureau chief in London, and Armando Iannucci, creator of the political satires The Thick of It and Veep. Humourist and journalist P J O’Rourke will be musing on America’s place in the world and the current president’s legacy will be examined in The Obama Years: Yes We Can – But Did We? Some of the best new writing from the States comes from literary stars Jonathan Safran Foer, Teju Cole, Michael Connelly and Ben Lerner and from newcomers Garnette Cadogan and Garth Greenwell.

Orange Prize-winning author of We Need to Talk About Kevin, Lionel Shriver, introduces her brilliant and unsettling new novel The Mandibles A Family, 2029-2047 while classic American literature is discussed and celebrated, from the Frontier novel to the novelist in Hollywood. From film screenings to poetry readings, from gospel and oratory to music and Route 66, as ever the packed programme will satisfy the most lively-minded lover of words.

Millennial Lives

Expect fierce, lyrical storytelling from MOBO award-winning hip hop artist, writer, poet and educator Akala while bloggers and vloggers Emma Gannon:Girl Lost in the City and Ella Mills:Deliciously Ella will be among some of the new entrepreneurs talking about Lives Online and the new economy. The Pool’s Marisa Bate and Rhiannon Lucy Cosslett discuss the highs and lows of life in Generation Y and ask ‘Are we screwed?’ while trend-forecaster and author of Stuffocation James Wallman and London Minimalists founder Michelle McGagh discuss whether you can really live a fuller life with less.

Taking stock of current debates from gender and clean eating, to feminism and mental health, Millennial Lives brings together iO Tillett Wright:Darling Days who lived as both a girl and a boy in youth and is now one of the leading voices in US gender rights with British author, chef and campaigner Jack Monroe to discuss breaking down gender and sexuality stereotypes; while curator Cecilia Knapp explores why many men struggle with mental health issues with Matthew Todd:Straight Jacket and Tim Grayburn and The Everyday Sexism Project founder, Laura Bates tells Emma Gannon about growing up as a 21st century, empowered girl.

Fiction

The best new fiction from rising stars and literary greats remains at the festival’s heart and there is no bigger international literary figure at the moment than Karl Ove Knausgaard who will receive this year’s Sunday Times Literary Excellence Award. Jonathan Safran Foer is here too to discuss his first novel in over a decade; Booker Prize winners Ian McEwan and Graham Swift introduce their new novels alongside the grande dame of Irish literature Edna O’Brien, award-winning novelist Lionel Shriver, American crime sensation Michael Connelly, festival favourite Sebastian Faulks, while Jilly Cooper talks to Clare Balding about her novel, Mount!

Other highlights include Sebastian Faulks:Where my Heart Used to Beat, Mark Haddon:The Pier Falls, Eimear McBride:The Lesser Bohemians; Tracy Chevalier:At the Edge of the Orchard; Maggie O’Farrell:This Must be the Place; Sarah Perry:The Essex Serpent; Francis Spufford:Golden Hill, Victoria Hislop:Cartes Postales from Greece and Alison Weir:Katherine of Aragon: The True Queen and giving an international flavour to the fiction programme are Norway’s Karl Ove Knausgaard; Iceland’s crime sensation Yrsa Sigurdardottir; and Israel’s Etgar Keret.

The Festival continues to support emerging novelists with its Proof Parties and Fiction at 7 events. This year’s Festival will see talks from rising stars including Sam Baker, Fiona Barton, Donald Ray Pollock, Bill Beverley, Susan Fletcher and Jill Dawson.

Classic Literature is celebrated with events on Shakespeare and Homer; Mariella Frostrup peers between the covers of literature’s most erotic stories and Sarah Churchwell examines the Great American Novel. The Big Read this year is Alice Walker’s The Color Purple, with a series of book group discussions and a panel event with writer and broadcaster Bidisha, poet Salena Godden and Nicolette Jones celebrating this modern classic.

Reginald D Hunter: Image: Kash Yusuf:L: Matthew Barzun

 

Poetry

The resurgence of poetry is present with Simon Armitage offers his latest work of poetry in translation, Pearl; leading poets Gillian Clarke, Alison Brackenbury, Helen Mort, Ian Duhig, Matthew Hollis, Sarah Howe and Blake Morrison read from their new collections; while Lemn Sissay; Salena Godden and Jemima Foxtrot perform.

Arts and Culture

Drawing the crowds will be comedians Alan Carr, Armando Iannucci, Alexei Sayle and Sara Pascoe; footballer Joey Barton; film and television star Alan Cumming:The Good Wife; and, Jeremy Paxman, Wilko Johnson and Tony Robinson.

Queen of punk Vivienne Westwood talks to Kirsty Wark about Get a Life; the product of six years of blogging from the forefront of climate change, fashion and social activism.

Andrew Davies now in his 80thyear, reveals the secrets behind his extraordinary television adaptations of War and Peace, Vanity Fair, Middlemarch and Pride and Prejudice and Mariella Frostrup gets saucy with the Erotic Review Magazine celebrating literature’s sexiest stories, from Marquis de Sade, Henry Miller & Vladimir Nabokov to modern writers.

The worlds of art and design are reflected across the programme with discussions on the late trailblazing artist and icon Georgia O’Keeffe and Chinese artist and arguably one of the most powerful figures in the contemporary art world, Ai WeiWei.

History

There is also the best of history from across the ages with historians Jonathan Bate and A.N. Wilson looking back at the life and times of Elizabeth II in her 90th birthday year; 101 year-old legendary barrister Jeremy Hutchinson sharing stories of life at the bar; one of the world’s foremost classicists, Mary Beard (SPQR) asks why the Roman empire still matters and Philosopher A.C. Grayling introduces the birth of the modern mind in the 17th century

In military history, Ben Macintyre shares his unprecedented access to the SAS archives in SAS Uncovered, marking the 75th anniversary of the founding of the elite military team. 100 years on from The Somme, the psychological impact of war is explored in Shellshock and bestselling author and historian, James Holland, explains one of the most astonishing battles of the Second World War.

Meanwhile, celebrated father and son historians Peter and Dan Snow tell the nation’s story through its fifty most important documents and Richard Osman and Alexander Armstrong, the witty TV quizmasters, will be revealing their Pointless History of the World.

Politics and Current Affairs

As always the festival is a hotbed for politicians and political debate. Humourist and journalist PJ O’Rourke will be musing on America’s place in the world and satirist and screenwriter Armando Iannucci discusses the madness of modern politics. "Big Beast" Ken Clarke talks about his twin loves of politics and jazz while fellow Ex-Chancellor of the Exchequer Ed Balls describes his years heading up the Treasury. Discussing their memoirs will be Margaret Hodge, the redoubtable Public Accounts Committee chairman, and Nick Clegg, while Ian Hislop spills the beans about 30 years editing Private Eye and Alan Johnson reveals the third instalment of his extraordinary and authentic memoir The Long and Winding Road.

In a trio of events programmed in partnership with the Sydney Writers’ Festival, three of the biggest issues facing the world today are discussed by expert panels. The fight against extremism is debated by a panel comprised of the director of Inspire Sara Khan, counter-terrorism expert Peter Neumann, and former Islamic extremist Hanif Qadir; our age of migration is discussed by Professor Alexander Betts, Principal Research Fellow at the National Institute of Economic and Social Research Jonathan Portes; while former Chair of the Intelligence and Security Committee Malcolm Rifkind and lawyer Helena Kennedy debate the role of intelligence agencies on the home front.

Derren Brown: Image: Seamus Ryan:L: Nadiya Hussain

 

Food and Lifestyle

There will be culinary stars aplenty with the chance to hear them speak and taste their recipes. Who could resist Afternoon Tea with Great British Bake-Off champion Nadiya Hussain, lunch with the master of Italian cooking Antonio Carluccio, or tapas with Miriam González Durántez. There’s also debate about the ‘clean eating’ movement and talk on bushcraft with Ray Mears.

In style, Fashion Director of The Times Anna Murphy and editor of Harper’s Bazaar Justine Picardie explain why what you wear matters in an illustrated guide to iconic fashion in Ten Frocks that Rocked the World and Vogue Style writer Harriet Quick looks at the history of the shoe.

Meanwhile, a whole generation of Jackie readers will rejoice, as actress Janet Dibley, author Emma Kennedy, and former Jackie editor Nina Myskow celebrate the magazine that defined them.

Psychology

In psychology, The Times takes a look at modern life in their Guide to Modern Manners and Modern Parenting. Carrie Weekes, co-founder of A Natural Undertaking and Barbara Chalmers, founder of The Final Fling discuss how to ‘own’ your send-off, the great explorer Ranulph Fiennes explains how he has dealt with crippling vertigo and much-loved broadcaster Sian Williams talks about her battle with cancer.

Families

The festival marks the birthday celebrations of two literary greats this year with Roald Dahl and Beatrix Potter themed events and to mark 100 years since Roald Dahl’s birth, children can take part in a phizz-whizzing quiz inspired by characters like the BFG, Willy Wonka and Matilda.

Dame Jacqueline Wilson’s legions of loyal fans can hear about her brand new character Clover Moon. There’s interactive drawing and storytelling with current Children’s Laureate Chris Riddell, former Laureate Michael Rosen and illustrator Nick Sharratt: ask Chris Riddell a question and he will live illustrate the answer.

Comedians and writers Julian Clary and David Baddiel will talk about their latest books and Lucy Worsley tells tales of the Tudor Court through the eyes of maid of honour Eliza Rose.

The hugely popular Robin Stevens, author of the Murder Most Unladylike series is here, while YA authors Holly Bourne:What’s a Girl Gotta Do?, Holly Smale:The Geek Girl books and CJ Daugherty:The Night School series discuss the influence of feminism on their writing. There are also special appearances from visiting American authors, David Levithan, Rachel Cohn, Laini Taylor and Sarah J. Maas and for Youtubers and Minecraft fans Dan TDM is here with his graphic novel adventure.

The full Festival line-up can be found here.

Booking for Cheltenham Literature Festival opens to Members at 13:00 on Wednesday, August 31 and to the general public at 13:00 on Wednesday, September 07. ω.

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Go Back 500 Years and Come Back to Now and Show Us What You Have You Found

Parchment diptych with the measurements of Christ’s length and side wound, inserted into a French book of hours: Image: Paisley, Renfrew District Museum and Art Gallery, unnumbered manuscript, fol. 13-14 forming a diptych

 


|| September 26: 2016 || ά. Upcycling may be viewed as a new “green” trend, but an Art Historian at the University of St Andrews has discovered 15th century book owners were way ahead of their time. In a new book published this week, Dr Kathryn Rudy has documented the miniature portraits added into medieval volumes, personalised verses written in the pages, and even curtains sewn into the books, to lend more grandeur to the illuminations.

Her findings reveal book owners were keen to personalise second-hand books in the same way that people today use social media to document memories and memorable events such as commemorating a deceased relative. Centuries ago, medieval books were made by highly specialised scribes, illuminators and book binders with labour-intensive processes using exclusive and sometimes exotic materials, parchment made from dozens or hundreds of skins, inks and paints made from prized minerals, animals and plants. Books were expensive and built to last.

They usually outlived their owners and rather than discard them when they became out-of-date, book owners found ways to update, amend and upcycle books or book parts. By making sometimes extreme adjustments, book owners kept their books fashionable and emotionally relevant.

Dr Rudy, Senior Lecturer in Art History at St Andrews, said: “Most manuscripts made before 1390 were bespoke and made for a particular client, but those made after 1390, especially books of hours, were increasingly made for an open market, in which the producer was not in direct contact with the buyer.

“Increased efficiency led to more generic products, which owners were motivated to personalise. It also led to more blank parchment in the book, for example, the backs of inserted miniatures and the blank ends of textual components. Book buyers of the late fourteenth and throughout the fifteenth century still held onto the old connotations of manuscripts, that they were custom-made luxury items, even when the production had become impersonal.”

The research is documented in a new book, Piety in Pieces: How Medieval Readers Customised their Manuscripts, made possible through Leverhulme Trust funding. The book has been published in a new electronic format Open Book which will make the research more accessible and affordable. The book is available in free digital and inexpensive printed editions here.

Case Study

In the fifteenth century Scotland produced few luxury manuscripts. Wealthy Scots often bought from the Netherlands and France, Scotland’s main trading partners, rather than England. In 1499 James Brown, dean of Aberdeen, bought such a manuscript prayer book from a workshop in the Southern Netherlands, modern-day Belgium.

The manuscript, now kept in the National Library of Scotland in Edinburgh, had a portrait of him kneeling in prayer before an image of the Virgin. He then personalised it by sewing curtains above the images to give them more grandeur and added verses for remembering the books of the bible, and a poem on his mother’s death, into some blank parchment at the end of the book. These changes made the book even more relevant to him. The verses on his mother’s death extend the function of the rest of the manuscript, to do what he could for the salvation of his mother’s soul.
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The Adventure of Perico Pico: Dr Natalia Cabajosa


 

|| September 24: 2016: Year Beta: Day One || ά. Dr Natalia Carbajosa, Puerto de Santa María, Spain, 1971, has a PhD in Shakespearean studies and teaches Academic and Professional English at the University of Cartagena in Spain. She has also tutored on English Literature at the Distance University UNED.

She has published several volumes of poetry, among which Desde una estrella enana 2009 and Tu suerte está en Ispahán 2012 can be highlighted. As a translator, she is the author of translated editions of the works of H.D. Trilogy:Trilogía 2008, Kathleen Raine, Farewell Happy Fields:Adiós, prados felices, in collaboration with Adolfo Gómez Tomé, 2013; and The Use of the Beautiful:Utilidad de la belleza, 2015, Rae Armantrout, Poems: 2004-2014, and Emily Fragos, Hostage:Rehén, 2016, among others.

This presentation is an extract from her children’s book The Adventures of Perico Pico, a bilingual edition, which is due to be published imminently, translated by herself and Jean Gleeson Kennedy, and illustrated by Teresa Sánchez Vivancos.

 

The Adventure of Perico Pico: Dr Natalia Cabajosa

Among all the children who were keen to learn some of Manchonuja’s magic tricks, only Perico Pico fulfilled his wish. The thing is, the others were not completely sure whether they really felt like going into a dark, stinking cabin in the gloomiest part of the forest, and having to be careful with Manchonuja as she stuck her hooked nose into their eyes or scratched them with the hairs on the end of her chin.

“Puh, what a bunch of chickens!”, thought Perico Pico as he headed for the cabin very early on his first day’s apprenticeship. He was carrying a rucksack with some clothes and a toothbrush, because Manchonuja had laid down the condition that he should stay with her for at least a fortnight.
When he arrived, Manchonuja was waiting for him with her typical witch’s coffee.
“Here, drink this, for you’re going to need all your energy”.

Perico Pico gulped it down, without hardly taking one breath, and trying to hide his disgust. Manchonuja pointed to a filthy settee where he could leave his stuff and sleep at night.
“Follow me”, she said, going down the stairs towards her witch’s lab.
When they went into the place where spells were cast, Perico Pico couldn’t stop trembling, half with excitement, and half with fear.

The cellar or lab, whichever you’d like to call it, was a stifling hole, with no light, full of cobwebs and shelves piled with dusty books and jars, like all witches’ dens, you know. Manchonuja brushed away some cobwebs in order to open a cupboard whose door squealed as if somebody had trodden on a cat’s tail.
“Here: uniform, tools…” she mumbled as she searched through the messy inside of the cupboard.
Perico Pico could hardly keep his nervousness at bay, and the waiting seemed endless to him. At last, Manchonuja took an old stained apron out, a feather duster, a cleaning cloth and an ordinary broom (not one for flying), and threw everything at him.

“Uh, it looks like a pigsty here. You’ll start by cleaning all this up, while I go for a walk.
“But…”
“No buts and ands, boy. When you finish, go up to the kitchen and prepare dinner. I have left out a jar of beans for you to make a stew. Oh, and the laundry basket is in the patio, next to the sink. Don’t forget to rinse the clothes properly before hanging them out. Arrivederci!”, she said at last, the cheeky thing, showing off her rudiments of Italian.

Huffing and puffing, Perico Pico started doing his chores, with the terrible suspicion that Manchonuja did not mean to teach him any magic at all that day.
And she didn’t either! Neither did she teach him anything the following day, nor the day after that. Every morning, while Manchonuja went off on a spree, Perico Pico scrubbed the floors, shook out the blankets, swept the fireplace, cleaned the windows, painted the fence… and every evening, exhausted, he fell sound asleep on the filthy settee.

Thus, a week went by. On the first day of the following week, Perico Pico made up his mind. He waited for Manchonuja to take off on her broomstick, removed his apron, and went down into the magic cellar. If that good-for-nothing of a witch wanted a servant for free, he said to himself, he would learn magic on his own account.
Although he had cleaned and tidied up the cellar, it was difficult to decide what to do, where to start. After looking round the shelves for a while, an old tome, almost as big as himself, caught his attention; on its spine you could read: Magic Tricks for Beginners

With great effort, he took it down off the shelf and placed it on the table. He got covered in a cloud of dust when he opened the pages, and it made him sneeze three times. At last, after blowing his nose and drying his eyes, he found the Table of Contents and began to read:
-First trick: turning water into blueberry syrup.
Perico Pico did not find it of much use, so he went on reading:
-Second trick: making small objects disappear.

This could be useful for playing a few good pranks, but even so, he was not quite convinced by it.
-Third trick: learning to fly.
Now that was definitely worth while! In fact, Perico Pico had begged the fairies to teach him to fly many times, but they had always refused; they held that human beings shouldn’t try to attempt to do what they were not meant to do, and that planes had been invented to that end. The fairies could be very pernickety sometimes!

Perico Pico got all the ingredients together for the recipe up very carefully and poured them into a pot that was always simmering over the fire. Fortunately, all the jars that Manchonuja had stored were perfectly labelled. Then, he added to the pot:
-Two quail’s eggs.
-A pinch of blackbird beak zest.
-Chestnut water.
-The tongue of a chameleon.
-Three leaves of nettle ground in a mortar.

How lucky! Everything was there! He brought the mixture to the boil and let it simmer. Later, he poured a little bit into a jar. All he had to do was drink it and, immediately afterwards, utter the following magic words: Aiunnovi Sapa, Pregusteni Zorrr. ω.

The Adventure of Perico Pico: By Dr Natalia Carbajosa: This is Chapter Six: The Sorcerer's Apprentice

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The British Library is on the Trail of the Philosopher's Stone: Way Into the Future Falling on October 20, 2017

Image: Tony Antoniou: BL

|| August 08: 2016 || ά. “I've got to go to the library!” said Hermione Granger of Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets and The British Library is excited to announce a new exhibition about the magic of Harry Potter, set to open at the Library in autumn 2017, and marking the twentieth anniversary of the publication of Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone. The exhibition will open on October 20, 2017, and run until February 28, 2018.

From medieval descriptions of dragons and griffins, to the origins of the philosopher’s stone, the exhibition will take readers on a journey to the heart of the Harry Potter stories. The exhibition will showcase an extraordinary range of wizarding books, manuscripts and objects, and combine centuries-old British Library treasures with original material from Bloomsbury’s and J.K. Rowling’s archives.

Jamie Andrews, Head of Culture and Learning at the British Library, said: “We at the British Library are thrilled to be working with J.K. Rowling and with Bloomsbury to mark the twentieth anniversary of Harry Potter, and to inspire fans with the magic of our own British Library collections.”

More information about the exhibition will be released early in 2017, and tickets will be on sale from spring 2017 at The British Library webstite.

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The 13th Althorp Literary Festival 2016: June 30-July 03

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Image: Althorp Estate

|| June 28: 2016 || ά. The 13th Althorp Literary Festival will take place on Thursday,  June 30-Friday, Saturday and Sunday, July 01-03, 2016 at Althorp House. Taking place over four days, this is the largest Althorp Literary Festival to date.

This year’s line-up includes: Britain’s bestselling non-fiction author, Bill Bryson; screenwriter Andrew Davies – whose most recent triumph was War and Peace; actor Brian Blessed; racehorse trainer Henrietta Knight; Today broadcaster James Naughtie; journalist, presenter and Labour peer Joan Bakewell; television personality and heritage campaigner Loyd Grossman; former Governor of the Bank of England Mervyn King; comedian and columnist Sara Pascoe; historian and television presenter Suzannah Lipscomb; renowned director Sir Richard Eyre; popular Classic FM presenter John Suchet; cricket authority Simon Hughes; investigative journalist and biographer Tom Bower; veteran radio presenter Paul Gambaccini; author and biographer Paula Byrne; and one of Britain's greatest experts on Shakespeare, Sir Jonathan Bate.

The 13th Althorp Literary Festival line-up also features a number of terrific local authors including Sue Bentley, Christine L. Corton, Lord Charles FitzRoy and Damian Collins, MP.

The Althorp Literary Festival is a unique and intimate celebration of the written word. In its first twelve years, the Festival has been privileged to host over 300 novelists, historians, comedians, actors, politicians, sportsmen and television personalities, including Boris Johnson, Alastair Campbell, Jung Chang, Julian Fellowes, Clare Balding, Sebastian Faulks, Helen Fielding, Michael Palin, Darcey Bussell, Sir Tom Stoppard and Twiggy.

"I took as the theme of this year’s Althorp line-up ‘originality’ – only one of the speakers has been to any of my previous literary festivals – and that’s Bill Bryson. I have resisted the temptation to stick with past successes, and have gone for freshness and diversity. It’s a lip-smacking line-up." Charles, Ninth Earl Spencer.

There are at least nine talks taking place on each of the four days with something to suit all interests. Complimentary fringe events include live music, poetry and performance art. There will also be pop-up shops, a variety of food and drink choices, and a spa service.

The Althorp Literary Festival is one of England’s great, summer, celebrations, and it takes place against the backdrop of one of the world’s most remarkable, private, historic homes.

Althorp House was built in 1508, by the Spencers, for the Spencers, and that is how it has remained for over 500 years. It is set in the tranquillity of its walled 550- acre parkland – which is part of the wider 13,000-acre estate – in the heart of beautiful, unspoilt, Northamptonshire countryside. Literature is synonymous with Althorp – part of its history. George John, 2nd Earl Spencer, amassed one of the greatest private libraries in 19th century Europe, amounting to over 43,000 volumes of priceless first editions, sprawling through the house’s grandest rooms.

Tickets to the 13th Althorp Literary Festival will be on sale from Tuesday 5th April, 2016. Tickets cost £17.50 per session (day tickets offer a large discount) and can be purchased online or over the telephone by calling 01604 770107. The telephone booking lines will be open from 9am to 5pm, Monday to Friday.

For further press and event information: contact Samantha Rose, Events Manager, via email, srose@althorp.com or telephone, 01604 770107. ω.

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The Humanion Profile Jemma Wayne: Author of Chains of Sand Who Speaks of the Black and White and of the Grey: Being a Thinker She Seeks to Gather the Fragmented Shades, Shreds and Debris of the Truth That Pays So Much for Everyone Seems to Break It to Fit into Their Viewscape


|| June 23: 2016 || ά. Jemma Wayne graduated from Cambridge University with an academic scholarship in Social and Political Sciences, before studying Broadcast Journalism at the University of Westminster and becoming a journalist and writer. Her first book, After Before was nominated for both the Baileys Prize and the Guardian Not the Booker Prize, and her second novel Chains of Sand is published this summer as one of the first fictional addresses of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. ω.

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The Chatsworth Festival 2016: September 23-25

 

Some of the speakers at the Festival: Clockwise from top left: Architect Amanda Levete, Curator Sir Roy Strong, Artist Wolfgang Buttress, The Duke of Devonshire, ceramicist Emma Bridgewater, curator Maria Balshaw

Julia Peyton Jones

Edmund de Waal

Maria Balshaw

Dan Pearson

|| June 08: 2016 ||  The Chatsworth Festival 2016 has finalised a pact programme that has been announced today that have elements, events and presentations by an array of people and voices involved in the 'art' to be excited about. Chatsworth, set in the Peak District in Derbyshire and home to the Duke and Duchess of Devonshire, announces the return of its annual festival Art Out Loud, which will take place in September 23-25 2016. The festival will see leading lights of the art world – artists, curators and writers, talking about their work, inspirations, and current discussions around art. The Festival events are ticketed and therefore, you are advised to ensure you have got the tickets for the events that you might like to attend. Tickets have gone on sale from today. Readmore

Image: Chatsworth Festival

Chatsworth, set in the Peak District in Derbyshire and home to the Duke and Duchess of Devonshire, announces the return of its annual festival Art Out Loud, which will take place in September 23-25 2016. The festival will see leading lights of the art world – artists, curators and writers – talking about their work, inspirations, and current discussions around art.

The first five names confirmed for the line-up are announced today. Director of Manchester’s recently refurbished Whitworth Art Gallery Maria Balshaw will challenge pre-conceptions about running a northern cultural powerhouse in her talk, ‘Not so Grim Up North’. Dan Pearson will discuss the art of landscape and garden design in his session, entitled ‘Painting with Plants’.
 

Left: Julia Peyton Jones: Image: John Swannell. Right: Maria Balshaw: Image: Johnnie Shand Kydd

Author Peter Frankopan will talk about his book The Silk Roads: A New History of the World, examining how the East has influenced Western art and culture over the centuries. Julia Peyton-Jones, who will soon be stepping down as director of the Serpentine Gallery, will provide a retrospective of her 25 years in charge of the cultural institution. Artist and author Edmund de Waal will share an account of his pilgrimage to the three most important sites in the history of porcelain – China, Dresden and Cornwall – as detailed in his book The White Road.

Now in its second year, Art Out Loud is a stimulating festival of talks that takes place in a marquee on the South Lawn and in Chatsworth’s historic Theatre. This year’s festival features new educational elements: local schools are being invited to join a design workshop at Chatsworth and to attend a talk hosted by a top British artist and one of the country’s leading museum directors. Other family friendly events are planned for the weekend.

Left: Edmund de Waal: Image: Ben McKee. Centre: Peter Frankopan. Right: Dan Pearson: Image: Sir Paul Smith

Local collective Peak District Artisans will hold a selling exhibition as part of the festival, with 30 members selected to exhibit work that complements the themes discussed at Art Out Loud. The eye-catching pieces and live artisanal demonstrations will cover a range of disciplines from watercolours to wrought iron, and pencil drawings to porcelain. The exhibition at Chatsworth marks a fitting way for Peak District Artisans to celebrate its 25th anniversary this year, having been established by Deborah Devonshire in 1991.

Tickets for Art Out Loud will be available from early June. Day Passes will be introduced for Saturday and Sunday, allowing visitors to attend multiple talks of their choice each day with the advance purchase of just one ticket.

All Art Out Loud ticket holders will have access to the Chatsworth garden, Sotheby’s Beyond Limits monumental sculpture exhibition and the Peak District Artisans exhibition.

Other arts-related exhibitions running in conjunction with Art Out Loud at Chatsworth are the photographic exhibition ‘Never a Bore: Deborah Devonshire and Her Set by Cecil Beaton’, and the ‘Grand Tour’ exhibition, part of a celebration of Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire’s cultural history and landscape, in conjunction with Nottingham Contemporary, the Harley Gallery and Derby Museums.

The full programme for Art Out Loud will be announced in June. To receive more information as it is released, join the mailing list at www.chatsworth.org.

The Chatsworth Festival: Art Out Loud
September 23-25, 2016
Chatsworth, Bakewell, Derbyshire, DE45 1PP

Festival Programmes

Friday: September 23
 
Jenny Saville - Beyond the Human Body
In conversation with Dr. Nicholas Cullinan, the contemporary British painter discusses her three decades of work, her enduring interest in old master paintings and her renewed engagement with drawing. (NB. A number of tickets for this talk are reserved for school pupils studying art and history of art. Early booking recommended as availability will be limited).
 
Duke of Devonshire - Viewing the Devonshire Collection through a Dozen Objects
In conversation with journalist Rachel Campbell-Johnston, the Duke discusses the Devonshire Collection at Chatsworth through a detailed examination of a dozen objects that demonstrate how the collection has grown and diversified over 450 years.
 
Deyan Sudjic - Why do we Need a Design Museum?
The director of the Design Museum is joined by Julia Peyton-Jones to discuss the re-design of the London cultural institution, previewing the new galleries and spaces and highlighting some of his favourite collection pieces, ahead of the museum’s opening in November.
 
Emma Bridgewater and Matthew Rice - Why I Own a Factory instead of Editing Novels
Emma Bridgewater and her husband, designer and illustrator Matthew Rice, discuss the twists and turns of setting up their renowned ceramics business - how the company came about, how they came to move their business to Stoke-on-Trent, and the stories behind some of Emma Bridgewater’s most famous patterns.
 
Peter Frankopan - The Silk Roads: their Impact on Western Culture and Art
Best-selling author Peter Frankopan’s talk transforms accepted ideas about the history of Europe and of European art, explaining how the textiles, objects and materials of the Silk Roads region had a profound impact on how visual forms were expressed in the west.
 
Saturday: September 24
 
Sir Roy Strong and Dr. Nicholas Cullinan - The National Gallery Then and Now
In 1967, Sir Roy Strong became the youngest ever director of the National Portrait Gallery at the age of 32 - and set about transforming its stuffy image and increasing visitor numbers. In 2015, Dr. Nicholas Cullinan became Director of the National Portrait Gallery aged 37. Sir Roy and Nicholas as they discuss the Gallery and their careers, then and now.
 
Amanda Levete - Architecture as Collaboration, Craft and Placemaking
Founder of the award-winning architecture and design studio AL_A, Amanda Levete discusses how architects go about designing public places and buildings where people want to spend time - and which make them feel good about life.
 
Maggi Hambling - Touch
One of Britain’s foremost contemporary figurative artists, Maggi Hambling, will talk about the fundamental importance of drawing to her practice, and the challenge of forging a deep connection with the subject being drawn. Maggi Hambling Touch: works on paper opens at the British Museum on 8 September 2016.
 
Maria Balshaw - Not so Grim Up North
Director of the Whitworth Gallery, Maria Balshaw, discusses how art and culture can be bolder and more risk-taking in the north of England, and shares stories from the 21st century northern cultural powerhouse.
 
Edmund de Waal - The White Road
Acclaimed writer and potter Edmund de Waal’s talk is a journey from China to Versailles, through Dresden to the mountains of South Carolina and the hills of Cornwall, to describe the history of porcelain, in a story that spans a thousand years.
 
Simon Thurley - The Set Square and the Spade: House and Garden in England as a Work of Art
Historian and former head of English Heritage, Simon Thurley, considers the house and garden as one of the most brilliant expressions of English artistic achievement and asks how we can restore the relationship between outstanding architecture and stunning landscape today.
 
Dan Pearson - Painting with Plants: the Art of Garden Design
Landscape and garden designer Dan Pearson explains how the artistic principles behind the use of colour and composition can be applied to painting and landscaping, touching on his recent projects, from Japan to Chelsea and Chatsworth.
 
Anna Keay - Living in the Past? Old Buildings, New Lives
Director of the Landmark Trust, Anna Keay, examines the preservation of listed buildings over the past half century and asks how far we should go to resuscitate the past.

Sunday: September 25
 
Martin Brown - How a Horrible Histories Drawing Happens - and a Lot More Besides!
Cartoonist illustrator of the Horrible Histories series, Martin Brown, presents a family-friendly show, full of jokes, facts and drawing. He sets out to prove that everyone - whether big or small - can draw and create art.
 
Dr. Nicholas Cullinan and Per Rumberg - Old Masters Now
Dr. Nicholas Cullinan joins Per Rumberg, Curator at the Royal Academy, to take a look at past, present and future exhibitions and discuss ways in which we can engage with art made centuries ago, making the old relevant now.
 
Julia Peyton Jones - Think the Unthinkable
In conversation with Rachel Campbell-Johnston, Julia Peyton-Jones reflects on her 25 years as director of the Serpentine, how the art world changed out of all recognition in that time, and why we should ‘think the unthinkable’.

Jonathan Warrender - Brushing up Memories and Conclusions: the Life of a Landscape Painter
Jonathan Warrender, artist in residence at Chatsworth, shares the pleasures and challenges of working in a Capability Brown landscape while recording views of the Chatsworth Estate.
 
Hugo Vickers - Malice in Wonderland: Cecil Beaton and his Friends
Biographer Hugo Vickers explores Chatsworth exhibition Never a Bore: Deborah Devonshire and her Set to explain how Cecil Beaton rose through the art of photography to become one of the greatest observers of the twentieth century.
 
Alison Oddey and Chris White - A Gift for Eleonora
An original performance installation that has been adapted to respond to Art Out Loud, this is a rare opportunity to see a live performance in Chatsworth’s Victorian Theatre. Based on the life of the remarkable Eleonora di Toledo (1522-1562), the Renaissance is brought to Chatsworth through the spoken word and contemporary interpretations of period costume and music (with a live saxophonist).

Details of two final speakers, one a sculptor exhibiting at Sotheby’s Beyond Limits exhibition 2016, will be announced at a later date.

About Chatsworth:
Chatsworth, set in the heart of the Peak District, is home to the Duke and Duchess of Devonshire, and has been passed down through sixteen generations of the Cavendish family. As well as its inspiring architecture, landscape and history, Chatsworth also houses the Devonshire Collection, one of Europe’s most significant art collections. Successive generations of the Devonshire family have commissioned leading artists as well as those less well known since the 17th century up until today. The 12th Duke and Duchess, and their son and daughter-in-law, share their predecessors’ enthusiasm for contemporary art. Fine and decorative art acquired over nearly 500 years, is on view throughout the visitor route as well as displayed and used in their private apartments. Family portraits by Lucian Freud and Sir Joshua Reynolds share rooms with works by Sir Anthony Caro, Ai Weiwei and Michael Craig-Martin. Outdoor sculpture by Allen Jones, Barry Flanagan and Richard Long join 18th-century marbles in the garden; Umbrella 2 and High Heel, also by Michael Craig-Martin, are the latest, permanent additions to the garden. Inside the house, the most significant art installation at Chatsworth since the creation of the Sculpture Gallery in 1832, opened to visitors in spring 2014. Jacob van der Beugel represents the Devonshire family’s DNA in ceramic panels on the walls of the North Sketch Gallery, in an unusual and creative take on the traditional portrait. These contemporary commissions embody Chatsworth: personal, forward-looking and enthusiastically shared with visitors.

The Chatsworth House Trust is an independent charity (no 511149) set up by the 11th Duke of Devonshire in 1981, to ensure the long-term survival of Chatsworth House, the art collection, garden, woodlands and park for the long term benefit of the public. The charity promotes the study and appreciation of Chatsworth as a place of historic, architectural and artistic interest and of natural beauty, and encourages the use and enjoyment of Chatsworth by visitors for education and recreation.

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Hay on Wye Festival 2016: May 26- June 05


|| May 18: 2016 || ά. In a year of literary landmarks: Shakespeare, Cervantes, Brontë and Dahl, and on the eve of the EU referendum and US election, Hay Festival 2016: May 26–June 05 brings Nobel Prize winners, novelists, scientists, global leaders, historians, musicians and comedians together in discussions and celebrations across more than 600 events in Hay-on-Wye, Wales.

The programme announced and available in full here, is diverse, pertinent and illuminating, featuring global leaders, thinkers, established talent and rising stars from across disciplines.

Hay Festival Director, Peter Florence, said: “These are the writers and thinkers and entertainers who thrill us this year. These are the women and men who inform the debate about Europe, who are adventuring in new technologies, and who are broadening our minds; and here are the lovers of language who cheer the celebrations of William Shakespeare, the greatest writer who ever lived – the playwright who understood most about the human heart.”

Germane Greer

Malorie Blackman

From stage and screen, Oscar winner Sam Mendes will discuss his film-making; Russell T Davies talks about his latest project alongside actress Maxine Peake, legendary screenwriter Andrew Davies talks about his adaptation of War and Peace; Jojo Moyes previews the new film adaptation of Me Before You; and actor Brian Blessed, travel legend Michael Palin, and Hollywood superstar Tippi Hedren discuss their careers. Plus Letters Live returns with a surprise all-star performance.

William Shakespeare is celebrated across the festival site with events starring leading figures from books, stage and screen. Simon Schama, James Shapiro, Germaine Greer, Gillian Clarke and others discuss his impact, while Howard Jacobson, Jeanette Winterson, and Tracy Chevalier discuss their recent retellings.

The festival’s own commemoration, a special project linked to the 400th anniversary of the death of Miguel de Cervantes, will be unveiled in a special event strand – Lunatics, Lovers and Poets – led by Salman Rushdie, Kamila Shamsie, Valeria Luiselli and Juan Gabriel Vásquez. Outside the festival site, Hay Festival: Talking About Shakespeare is a digital platform sharing ideas on Shakespeare in this anniversary year, with a wider audience.

Kazuo Ishiguro

Lisa Dwan

Laura Marling

Three weeks before the June 23 EU referendum, the festival places a magnifying glass on the main issues, with discussions led by former Labour Prime Minister Gordon Brown; former Greek Finance Minister Yanis Varoufakis; former Bank of England Governor Mervyn King; and former advisor to David Cameron, Steve Hilton. As ever, the festival also incorporates a wider global affairs strand, with the US election, Russian resurgence, and the Middle East looming large, led by panellists including: Nobel

Literature Nobel Laureate Svetlana Alexievich, former deputy head of NATO Richard Shirreff, former head of the CIA and NSA Michael V Hayden, and Iranian human rights lawyer Shirin Ebadi.

Stars from book and screen celebrate the great outdoors, including Kate Humble, Monty Don and Chris Packham, while the past is revisited in talks from Tom Holland, Max Hastings, Jonathan Dimbleby, Philippe Sands and many more. Meanwhile, business leaders including BP CEO John Browne and household name Emma Bridgewater appear alongside a host of big thinkers including philosopher AC Grayling, mental health campaigner Ruby Wax, journalist Caitlin Moran and Everyday Sexism founder Laura Bates.

Laura Bates

Jude Law

Tinariwen

To balance the serious discussions, a rich strand of comedy and music will once again fill festival tents, with internationally acclaimed comedians taking the stage, including Sarah Millican, Marcus Brigstocke, Dara Ó Briain, Sara Pascoe, Isy Suttie, and the Olivier Award-winning improvised musical Showstoppers, plus music headlined by American singer-songwriter Suzanne Vega; English singer-songwriters Billy Bragg and Laura Marling; Scottish superstar K T Tunstall; Indie rockers Turin Brakes; and Sengalese sensation Baaba Maal.

A newly named children’s programme – HAYDAYS – offers a range of activities and events for families and young adults led by some of the biggest names in children’s writing including Julia Donaldson, Jacqueline Wilson, Malorie Blackman, Chris Riddell, Michael Morpurgo, Cressida Cowell, and CBBC’s Sam and Mark, plus YA superstars Frances Hardinge, Holly Smale, Juno Dawson, Patrick Ness, and vlogging sensation Caspar Lee, who will discuss the power of social media and his unexpected life at the heart of it.

Meanwhile, beyond the main stages is a whole host of activities for all ages to discover and enjoy, from the best local food and drink, creative workshops and artists’ exhibitions, to a blockbuster programme of free BBC events and the opportunity to explore the stunning countryside surrounding the festival site.

Hay Festival brings writers and readers together to inspire, examine and entertain at its festivals around the world. Nobel Prize-winners and novelists, scientists and politicians, historians and musicians talk with audiences in a dynamic exchange of ideas. Hay Festival’s global conversation shares the latest thinking in the arts and sciences with curious audiences live, in print and digitally. Hay Festival also runs wide programmes of education work supporting coming generations of writers and culturally hungry audiences of all ages. Join us to imagine the world.

Acclaimed author, actor and writer Stephen Fry is President of the organisation; Peter Florence is Director; and Caroline Michel, CEO of leading literary and talent agency Peters Fraser and Dunlop, is Chair of the festival board.

Established around a kitchen table in 1987, the organisation now reaches a global audience of thousands every year and continues to grow and innovate, building partnerships and initiatives alongside some of the leading bodies in arts and the media, including global partners the BBC, ACW, TATA, British Council and LSE; friends of Hay Festival the Daily Telegraph, Visit Wales, Baillie Gifford, Oxfam, and Good Energy; and international partners Wales Arts International, AC/E, Embassy of Chile, Embassy of Colombia, and the Embassy of Mexico.

Stephen Fry

Peter Florence

Sarah Millican

And William Shakespeare

Four hundred years on from the death of William Shakespeare, the Bard is celebrated across the festival site with events in the adult and family programmes, starring leading figures from books, stage and screen.

On stage and screen, former Dr Who show-runner, Russell T Davies, talks about his passion project – a film adaptation of A Midsummer Night’s Dream – with the actress who plays Titania, Maxine Peake; the Deputy Artistic Director of the Royal Shakespeare Company, Erica Whyman, discusses her current production of A Midsummer Night’s Dream and RSC Artistic Director Gregory Doran discusses Shakespeare’s legacy.

Leading academics give their take on Shakespeare’s influence: Simon Schama examines his myths of England; James Shapiro directs a spotlight on 1606; Germaine Greer talks about the playwright’s poetry, and Gillian Clarke discusses Lear.

Renowned writers offer their commemorations, including the novelists behind the recent Hogarth retellings of Shakespeare, Howard Jacobson:Shylock Is My Name, Jeanette Winterson:The Gap of Time and Tracy Chevalier talking about his influence on them; Stanley Wells introduces his anthology of Shakespeare essays alongside Margaret Drabble, while Don Paterson reads Shakespeare’s sonnets.

To read is to be able to imagine the worlds of words made of nothing but joy of pure words. At the Hay reading.

Do pay a visit to Books

To commemorate the 400th anniversary of the deaths of both Miguel de Cervantes and William Shakespeare, the festival has commissioned six English language and six Hispanic writers to create stories to celebrate both writers and to offer new and intriguing perspectives on them. A special stream of events – Talking about Shakespeare: Lunatics, Lovers and Poets – will showcase their work, including appearances by Salman Rushdie, Kamila Shamsie, Valeria Luiselli, Juan Gabriel Vásquez, Nell Leyshon, Vicente Molina Foix, Yuri Herrera, Marcos Giralt Torrente and Ben Okri.

Outside the festival site, Hay Festival: Talking About Shakespeare is a digital platform sharing ideas on Shakespeare in this anniversary year, with a wider audience.
Fiction

The backbone of the festival remains a rich picking of discussions around the best new fiction from established names and rising stars, including Salman Rushdie: Two Years, Eight Months and Twenty-Eight Nights, Edna O’Brien:The Little Red Chairs, Fay Weldon:Before the War, James Runcie:Sidney Chambers and The Dangers of Temptation, Joanne Harris:Different Class, Rose Tremain:The Gustav Sonata, Graham Swift:Mothering Sunday, Harry Parker:Anatomy of a Soldier, Melvyn Bragg:Now is the Time, Thomas Keneally:Napolean’s Last Island, Valeria Luiselli:The Story of My Teeth, Peter Carey:Amnesia: A Novel, Tahmima Anam:The Bones of Grace, Mark Haddon:The Pier Falls, Jonathan Coe:Number 11, Marina Lewycka:The Lubetkin Legacy, James Runcie:The Grantchester Mysteries, S J Parris:Conspiracies plus BBC security correspondent Frank Gardner, who launches his debut novel Blood and Sand; and Alain de Botton offers his first novel in 20 years:The Course of Love.

A series of unique pairings will also draw crowds, including Irvine Welsh:The Blade Artist in conversation with 2015 Man Booker winner Marlon James:A Brief History of Seven Killings, and David Mitchell:The Bone Clocks in conversation with Sjon:Moonstone, The Boy Who Never Was.

The resurgence of poetry is felt across the programme as Simon Armitage offers his latest work of poetry in translation, Pearl; T S Eliot Prize-winner Sarah Howe discusses her debut Loop of Jade, while spoken word artist and poetry slam champion Hollie McNish, and Roger McGough and LiTTLe MACHiNe perform.

Leading graphic novelists also feature significantly with Simon Grennan discussing his Anthony Trollope adaptation, Dispossession; and Si Spencer and Dix Grim on their award-winning work, Klaxon.

A bicentenary celebration of the birth of Charlotte Brontë is led by Tracy Chevalier, Lionel Shriver, Kirsty Gunn and Joanna Briscoe; while John Crace and John Sutherland re-read her best works; and award-winning biographer Claire Harman looks at her influence today.

Stage and Screen

The vast influence of books on screen comes under the spotlight as legendary screenwriter Andrew Davies discusses his recent adaptation of War and Peace; novelist Jojo Moyes previews the new film based on her best-selling novel, Me Before You, alongside the film’s director Thea Sharrock; and the makers of BBC crime drama Shetland appear with the author of the novels it is based on, Ann Cleeves.

World-renowned directors will join the festival to showcase their latest work, with Director Stephen Frears discussing his new film, Florence, starring Meryl Streep as the tone-deaf singer Florence Foster Jenkins; and Sam Mendes in conversation on his award-winning film-making.

Stars of the stage and screen also attract attention, with Brian Blessed talking about his life in front of and behind the camera; Michael Palin discusses his memoir Travelling to Work; Hollywood actress Tippi Hedren talks about her long acting career and work for endangered Big Cats; plus a surprise al-star cast will return for Letters Live, led in previous years by Benedict Cumberbatch and Jude Law.

UK Today

UK politics and life today comes into focus in a series of events. Former Director of Liberty Shami Chakrabarti discusses whether we could scrap the Human Rights Act. In politics, investigative journalist Tom Bower takes another look at Labour’s longest serving premier, Tony Blair, ahead of the Chilcot report in June, while our place in the wider world is discussed as Oxford Professor of Globalisation Ian Goldin talks to Bronwen Maddox about how we can navigate the new age of discovery we find ourselves in.

Geographers Danny Dorling and Bethan Thomas offer findings from their analysis of UK social change over the past 15 years, while Dame Esther Rantzen reflects on the core work of children’s services and the challenges facing young people today.

Around the World

Three weeks before the June 23 EU referendum, the festival looks at our relationships with our Continental neighbours. Former Labour Prime Minister Gordon Brown sets out his case for Britain in Europe; former Greek Finance Minister Yanis Varoufakis looks at the dramatic narrative of Europe’s economic rise and fall; and a panel of politicians, business leaders and journalists, including Roger

Bootle, Liam Fox, Nick Herbert, Allison Pearson and Roland Rudd weigh up the pros and cons of membership. Minister of State for Trade and Investment Mark Price discusses Britain’s economic and business relationships with the EU. Nik Gowing, Simon Schama, Gillian Tett and special guests close the festival with a special EU debate in which the Hay audience will make their final decision: In or Out.

Russia comes under the microscope as 2015 Nobel Literature Laureate, Svetlana Alexievich, talks about its past and present, while foreign correspondent at the Guardian Luke Harding attempts to reach the truth behind the assassination of Alexander Litvenyenko. Former Deputy Head of NATO Richard Shirreff argues that we are sleepwalking our way into war with Russia, while former BBC Diplomatic Correspondent Bridget Kendall talks about the re-emergence of Russia as a superpower.

In a landmark election year, the US dominates a series of discussions. US intelligence expert and the only person to helm both the CIA and NSA, Michael V Hayden, offers an unprecedented high-level narrative of America’s intelligence wars; President Bill Clinton’s former Defence Secretary, William Perry, discusses his long career, including the creation of the Nuclear Security Project; BBC News anchor Norma Percy looks inside the Obama White House while discussing her latest BBC 2 series, which was eight years in the making; and the race for the White House is spotlighted in a special debate featuring Bronwen Maddox, Jane Mayer, Jim Naughtie and Mark Thompson.

The Middle East is also drawn into discussion, with Iranian human rights lawyer and activist, Shirin Ebadi, talking to Helena Kennedy about her fight for reform inside Iran; frontline investigative journalist James Harkin discusses the Islamic State.

In global economics, former Bank of England Governor Mervyn King analyses the causes of the global financial crisis, and economist, global strategist and presidential adviser Philippa Malmgren, offers a way to navigate the world’s turbulent economy.

Plus, following the signing of the COP21 Agreement at last year’s climate convention in Paris, the Executive Secretary of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, Christiana Figueres, explains how it can become a reality.

Reading away at the Hay

History

As ever, the festival’s historical interest strand offers rich pickings across the ages. Tom Holland looks at the making of England; AC Grayling pinpoints the C17th as the birth of the modern mind in The Age of Genius; Simon Sebag Montefiore and Jung Chang chart the crimes of Stalin and Mao; and Niall Ferguson traces the rise, fall and revival of Henry Kissinger.

On war, journalist and war historian Max Hastings talks about the machinations of the Second World War; Jonathan Dimbleby tackles on the Battle of the Atlantic; Sinclair McKay and Thomas Briggs reveal unknown secrets of Bletchley’s wartime operation and the Enigma; Russian historian Robert Service looks at the end of the Cold War; John France gives an account of the 1187 Battle of Hattin;

James Holland takes us to Burma in 1944; and Hugh Sebag-Montefiore takes us to the Battle of the Somme.

On Germany, two of the world’s greatest historians, former director of the British Museum, Neil MacGregor, and Regius Professor of History at Cambridge University, Richard Evans, discuss Germany and memory. Director and writer David Evans introduces a special screening of his new documentary with Philippe Sands, What Our Fathers Did: A Nazi Legacy, while Sands gives this year’s Eric Hobsbawm Lecture.

Tech

The effect of technology on our working lives is debated with Hillary Clinton’s innovations advisor, Alec Ross, who discusses the industries of the future; father-son duo Richard and Daniel Susskind look at the future of professionals in our digital society; and Cambridge Lecturer in Mechatronics, Fumiya Iida, asks if it’s a good idea that robots can steal our jobs.

The importance of algorithms is debated with Oxford Computer Science Professor, Leslie Goldberg, discussing their limits, while Victorian computing visionary and architect of the world’s first algorithm, Ada Lovelace, is celebrated by Oxford Professor of Computer Science, Ursula Martin.

Plus, Director of the Oxford Internet Institute, Helen Margetts, looks at how social media shape collective action; while Research Professor of Cognitive Science at the University of Sussex, Margaret A Boden, looks at the practical applications of artificial intelligence.

Science and Health

From radiation to ribosomes, a range of prize-winning scientists offers a look at the frontiers of our discovery. Nobel Prize-winning chemist, Venki Ramakrishnan, gives the Royal Society Lecture, on unravelling the ribosome; science writer Kat Arney talks about the language of genes; Hannah Crichtlow explores the depths of the human brain; and Professor Timothy J Jorgensen gives the story of radiation.

The first female winner of The Royal Society’s book prize, Gaia Vince, charts our new geological age: the Athropocene; and Marcus du Sautoy discusses the limits of what we can know, in the John Maddox Lecture.

In Outer Space, Commercial Director of Virgin Galactic Stephen Attenborough talks about the next step in human space exploration; astronomer Martin Rees shares his excitement around recent cosmic discoveries; UCL solar physicist and Kohn Award winner Lucie Green takes us to the centre of the sun; while comedian and science writer Ben Miller searches for life in the wider universe.

In health, Director of the Wellcome Trust Jeremy Farrar debates the future of global health, while, closer to home, philosopher, poet and novelist Raymond Tallis leads a discussion around the NHS. Samuel Johnson Prize-winner Steve Silberman gives the Baillie Gifford Lecture on his study of autism, NeuroTribes; while comedien and mental health campaigner, Ruby Wax, talks about mindfulness as a scientific solution to stress; clinical psychologist Oliver James explores the childhood causes of individuality and Joan Bakewell delivers the Wellcome Book Prize Lecture.

Mark Watson

Tom Moorhouse

Business and Big Ideas

As ever, big thinking dominates the Hay programme. Former BP CEO John Browne explores the rift between big business and society; renowned behavioural economist Richard Thaler looks at the discipline’s growing influence; Financial Times columnist Gillian Tett discusses the catastrophic effect of specialising too deeply (The Silo Effect); American psychologist and MacArthur Fellowship winner Angela Duckworth explains how talent can only take you so far; Steve Hilton returns to discuss his ideas around a world that’s more human; while acclaimed columnist Caitlin Moran offers a manifesto all of her own.

Feminism

Debates around sexism today and pioneering women of the past form a core strand of programming once more, with the founder of the Everyday Sexism Project Laura Bates in discussion with columnist Bryony Gordon around the new wave of feminism, plus Mabel van Oranje, the initiator of Girls Not Brides: The Global Partnership to End Child Marriage and member of the Dutch Royal Family, reflects on lessons learned from two decades of fighting for human rights.

Personal Stories

Showcasing the latest works of memoir and biography, the festival focuses on a range of personal stories that will resonate. Scottish comedien Susan Calman offers her autobiography Cheer Up, Love: Adventures in Depression with the Crab of Hate; Cathy Rentzenbrink talks about a fate worse than death (The Last Act of Love); Erwin James discusses redemption after incarceration (Redeemable); Amy Liptrot gives an account of her escape from alcoholism (The Outrun); and David Aaronovitch gives the annual Christopher Hitchens Lecture, linked to his new memoir, Party Animals: My Family and Other Communists.

Specialist passions come through strongly, too, with Edmund de Waal taking us on a journey from east to west in his history of porcelain, The White Road; while Lars Mytting meditates on the human instinct for survival in discussing his latest work Norwegian Wood.

Art and Design

The worlds of art and design are reflected across the schedule, with Magnum photographer Stuart Franklin talking about the human impulse to document; Emma Bridgewater talking about Pattern & The Secrets of Lasting Design; Red or Dead co-founder Wayne Hemingway taking us on a journey through fashion; and graphic designer Peter Chadwick discussing brutalist architecture.

Great Outdoors

Hay’s proximity to, and innate love of, the great British outdoors is reflected across programming with a range of events starring familiar faces from book and screen. Monty Don looks at C18th gardens; Kate Humble talks about the extraordinary partnership between humans and dogs; Chris Packham talks about his coming of age memoir, Fingers in the Sparkle Jar; Horatio Clare discusses the near extinction of the curlew; historian Thomas Pakenham shares his profound love of trees; environmentalist Tony Juniper looks at the state of the planet; and local farmer and award-winning nature writer, John Lewis-Stempel returns to Hay with The Running Hare: The Secret Life of Farmland.

At the Hay: Catching up

The festival opens on Thursday, May 26 with its annual sustainability platform: the Hay on Earth Forum. Programmed by Andy Fryers, this year’s programme covers a swathe of sustainability topics from Fair Tax to Re-wilding, Permaculture to the importance of artisan crafts, with representatives Minette Batters, NFU Deputy President; Julia Aglionby, Executive Director of the Foundation for Common Land; and Sophie Wynne-Jones, trustee of the Wales Wild Land Foundation.

Music and Comedy

To balance the serious discussions, a rich strand of comedy will once again fill festival tents with internationally acclaimed comedians. These include Dara Ó Briain, Sarah Millican, Marcus Brigstocke, Sara Pascoe, Isy Suttie, Jess Robinson, Shazia Mirza, Mark Steel, and the Olivier Award-winning improvised musical Showstoppers.

The spoken word, applause and laughter are not the only sounds to be found on site as the festival’s music events showcases a diverse array of performances. Global talent headlines the wider programming, with American singer songwriter Suzanne Vega; English singer-songwriters Billy Bragg and Laura Marling; Scottish superstar K T Tunstall; Indie rockers Turin Brakes; Sengalese sensation Baaba Maal; Brazilian singer Flavia Coelho and Wales-India collaboration Ghazalaw.

Music takes place throughout the day with BBC Radio 3 lunchtime recitals returning, featuring performances from the Sitkovetsky Duo – Alexander Sitkovetsky:violin and Wu Quian:piano; pianist Pavel Kolesnikov; trombonist and pianist Peter Moore and James Baillieu; The Cremona Quartet and guitarist Morgan Szymanski; before the Welsh legends Bryn Terfel and Rebecca Evans give the closing concert.

Hay Festival 2015: Sasha McVeigh

About Hay Festival: Hay Festival brings writers and readers together to inspire, examine and entertain at its festivals around the world. Nobel Prize-winners and novelists, scientists and politicians, historians and musicians talk with audiences in a dynamic exchange of ideas. Hay Festival’s global conversation shares the latest thinking in the arts and sciences with curious audiences live, in print and digitally. Hay Festival also runs wide programmes of education work supporting coming generations of writers and culturally hungry audiences of all ages. Join us to imagine the world. Acclaimed author, actor and writer Stephen Fry is President of the organisation; Peter Florence is Director; and Caroline Michel, CEO of leading literary and talent agency Peters Fraser and Dunlop, is Chair of the festival board. Established around a kitchen table in 1987, the organisation now reaches a global audience of thousands every year and continues to grow and innovate, building partnerships and initiatives alongside some of the leading bodies in arts and the media, including global partners the BBC, ACW, TATA, British Council and LSE; friends of Hay Festival the Daily Telegraph, Visit Wales, Baillie Gifford, Oxfam, and Good Energy; and international partners Wales Arts International, AC/E, Embassy of Chile, Embassy of Colombia, and the Embassy of Mexico. Hay Festival Wales takes place from May 26–5 June 05, 2016 in the beautiful setting of the Wye Valley. In May 2017, Hay Festival will celebrate its 30th anniversary. ω.

Hay Festival Global Calendar

Hay Festival Wales, UK: May 26-5 June 05, 2016
Hay Festival Kells, Ireland: June  23-26, 2016
Hay Festival Queretaro, Mexico: September 01-04, 2016
Hay Festival Segovia, Spain: September 22-25, 2016
Hay Festival Winter Weekend in Wales, UK: November 26-27, 2016
Hay Festival Arequipa, Peru: December 08-11, 2016
Hay Festival Cartagena, Colombia: January 26-29, 2017

Images: Hay on Wye Festival: one of the images, of Peter Florence, is credited to Keith Morris. However, The Great Gatsby image is not Hay Festival's

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Meg Rosoff is Awarded the 2016 Astrid Lindgren Memorial Award

Image: The News Market

|| May 26: 2016 || ά. Author Meg Rosoff was born in in Boston, United States in 1956. She has lived and worked in London for many years. The jury's citation reads: Meg Rosoff's young adult novels speak to the emotions as well as the intellect. In sparkling prose, she writes about the search for meaning and identity in a peculiar and bizarre world. Her brave and humorous stories are one-of-a-kind. She leaves no reader unmoved.

Meg Rosoff made her authorial debut in 2004 with the dystopian YA novel How I Live now, which became an immediate success. Since then she has written six more YA novels, several picture books, and a novel for adults. Her collected body of work is richly varied and profoundly affecting for readers of all ages.

Rosoff writes about young people in the borderlands between childhood and adult life who face difficult trials in their quests to find themselves. At times they are pushed to the brink of the unbearable and beyond. Her protagonists battle questions of identity and sexuality and are thrown involuntarily into chaotic situations. Like Astrid Lindgren, Rosoff empathizes completely with young people and is utterly loyal to them. The adult world, when it appears, remains on the periphery. She uses concrete, vibrant language, whether she is describing a landscape, a piece of clothing, or the groceries in the pantry. She infuses darkness with humour to produce stylistic masterpieces.

In What I was:2007, questions of body, identity, and gender, the confusions of falling in love, and the desire and sexuality of the young all come to a head as the narrator sets out to find himself and choose a path different from the one laid out for him by the adult world.

At times, as in Just in Case:2006, reality and fantasy almost merge, so that we are hard-pressed to say what is "really" happening. In There is no Dog:2011, things get truly crazy when a hormonal teen is given the job of the great Creator.

Meg Rosoff is the recipient of numerous prizes, including Guardian Children's Fiction Prize, Carnegie Medal and Deutsche Jugendliteraturpreis. Her books have been translated into more than 20 languages and she became Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature in 2014.

The Astrid Lindgren Memorial Award will be presented in a ceremony at the Stockholm Concert Hall on May 30, 2016. ω.

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Cardiff University at the Hay on Wye Festival with the Story of the Discovery of Einstein's Gravitational Waves: May 26-June 05

|| May 24: 2016: Cardiff University News || ά. The story behind one of the biggest breakthroughs in physics for 100 years is being told as part of the University’s line up at this year’s Hay Festival. Professor Bangalore Sathyaprakash and Dr Patrick Sutton explain the University’s major role in the discovery of gravitational waves last year and consider the possibility of further revelations.

Other University experts will look at topics as diverse as the threat from objects in space, tax avoidance, air pollution, Roald Dahl, the tiny citizens inside our bodies and establishing a digital literary atlas of Wales. The Hay on Wye Festival 2016 runs in the mid Wales town from Thursday, May 26 to Sunday, June 05. Gravitational waves, predicted by Albert Einstein in his famous Theory of General Relativity 100 years ago, made international headlines last September. Hundreds of scientists around the world were involved in the research with Cardiff University playing a vital role examining data.

Professor Sathyaprakash said: “Gravitational wave observations provide a new tool to understand stupendously energetic phenomena in the Universe such as colliding neutron stars and black holes, collapsing stars and supernovae and flaring and rapidly spinning neutron stars. They can help us gain deeper insights into extremes of physics.”

Germane Greer

Malorie Blackman

Professor Sathyaprakash said Cardiff University scientists were now looking at the remaining data and hopeful of further revelations. “We are currently analysing the remaining three months of data from the first observing run,” he said.

“Based on the rates we estimated with the first detection, there is a better than 80% chance that the remaining data will contain at least one more binary black hole merger signal. We expect to release the results in the coming month or two.”

Professor Sathyaprakash and Dr Sutton, from the School of Physics & Astronomy, will appear at 20:30 on Thursday 2 June as part of the Cardiff Series of Cardiff University talks at the festival.

These include Dr Simone Cuff, from the School of Medicine, who is examining the role of bacteria in our bodies, from whether bacteria can protect against cancer to the value of eating bio-live yoghurt. “A lot of people are really negative about bacteria. Yes, some can make you sick but some others are really important in keeping you well,” she said.

Kazuo Ishiguro

Lisa Dwan

Laura Marling


“Recent insights have shown how they help you digest your food, prevent 'bad bacteria' from coming in and making you ill, and can manufacture vitamins for us that our bodies can't make for themselves.”

Dr Cuff’s talk takes place at 20:30 on Tuesday, May 31. A ground-breaking insight into the place of Wales in the imagination of Roald Dahl will be revealed by Professor Damian Walford Davies, of the School of English, Communication and Philosophy. He will discuss his landmark new book, Roald Dahl: Wales of the Unexpected, which explores the author through a new lens – the country of his birth and early life – with contributions that examine the presence of Wales in Dahl’s work.

The talk takes place on Thursday, June 02, at 17:30 and is one of a number of events involving the University that celebrate the world-famous author in his centenary year. The threat of objects from outer space is the basis of Dr Paul Roche’s talk as he examines whether we’re likely to go the same way as the dinosaurs.

Astronomers regularly discover huge lumps of rock and ice hurtling past Earth but if some of them were to actually hit us, the consequences could be terrifying. However it’s not all bad news. "We're becoming increasingly aware of the potential threat posed by space debris, both natural and man-made, but also the possible economic benefits that might come from mining asteroids,” added Dr Roche, of the School of Physics & Astronomy.

His talk is on Friday, June 03 at 19:00.

Dr Kelly BéruBé, School of Biosciences and Reader in Biosciences at The Lung and Particle Research Group, discusses the serious health problems that research suggests is caused by lungs being exposed to airborne particles in everyday life. She will share the latest findings during her talk at 20:30 on Saturday, May 28.

Dr BéruBé is also delivering a separate talk as part of a Welsh Government-funded pilot event in which researchers present 20-minute lectures to students aged 16 to 25 years old. She will discuss the recycling of medical waste tissues as part of the festival’s 2016 theme of sustainability.

Laura Bates

Jude Law

Tinariwen

Dr Joe O'Mahoney is considering the subject of tax avoidance, a practice at the forefront of recent political and economic news, during a debate at 14:30 on Thursday, May 26.

Dr O’Mahoney, of Cardiff Business School, and guests, will explore how tax evasion works, what can be done about it, and local forms of resistance to these practices. The establishment of a digital literary atlas of Wales and its borderlands is the subject of a talk by Dr Jon Anderson, from the School of Planning and Geography, on Friday, May 27 at 14:30.

This new literary geography is based on the assumption that novels and stories cannot be confined by the covers of a book, but become part of the lived experience of the world around us through the reader’s imagination.  ω.

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The Writing Process: Masterclasses with Book Aid International


||April 09, 2016|| Authors Sally Green, Kerry Hudson, Sally Gardner and Paul Cornell will be running an exciting series of one-off masterclasses with Writers & Artists and Book Aid International.

24th, 26th May, 1st, 2nd June: 6:30pm to 8:30pm: Bloomsbury Publishing, London

After the success of last year’s inaugural run of masterclasses (starring Matt Haig, Rowan Coleman, Helen Walsh and Piers Torday), Writers & Artists will once again join forces with library charity Book Aid International to offer authors developing their craft an opportunity to learn from the best, with each masterclass offering insight into a different aspect of the writing process.

Crucially, half of the revenue from each ticket sold will be donated to Book Aid International , a charity that provides up to one million brand new books to libraries in Africa each year, as well as supporting libraries through projects and training.

Booking: tickets for each masterclass are £35 and can be booked here or by calling 0207 631 5985.

Discount: To attend all four masterclasses call 0207 631 5985 to secure a special price of £120.

Contact information: For further information about this series of events or Writers & Artists in general, please contact James Rennoldson (james.rennoldson@bloomsbury.com). For further information about Book Aid International, please contact Jessica Faulkner (Jessica.faulkner@bookaid.org)

Speaker profiles

Sally Green started writing in 2010 and hasn’t stopped since. Half Bad was her ground-breaking first novel. It won the prestigious title of 'Best Book for Teens' in the Waterstones Children's Book Prize and broke the world record for most foreign language rights sold ahead of publication. It was followed by Half Wild. The recently released Half Lost is her last novel in the Half Life trilogy.

Kerry Hudson was born in Aberdeen. Her first novel, Tony Hogan Bought Me An Ice-Cream Float Before He Stole My Ma was published in 2012 by Chatto & Windus and was the winner of the Scottish First Book Award while also being shortlisted for the Southbank Sky Arts Literature Award, Guardian First Book Award, Green Carnation Prize, Author’s Club First Novel Prize and the Polari First Book Award. Kerry’s second novel, Thirst was published in 2014 by Chatto & Windus won France’s most prestigious award for foreign fiction, the Prix Femina and was shortlisted for the Green Carnation Prize.

Sally Gardner is an award-winning novelist from London. Her books have been translated into 22 languages and have sold more than one million copies in the UK. Her historical novel, I, Coriander, won the Smarties Children's Book Prize in 2005. Two thrillers both set at the time of the French Revolution, The Red Necklace and The Silver Blade, were shortlisted for the Guardian Children's Fiction Prize in 2009. Her YA novel, The Double Shadow, was published in 2011 to critical acclaim. Stories for middle readers include Lucy Willow and the popular Magical Children series. She has also written and illustrated picture books including The Fairy Catalogue, The Glass Heart and The Book of Princesses. Sally Gardner continues to be an avid spokesperson for dyslexia, working to change the way it is perceived by society.

Paul Cornell has been Hugo-nominated for his work in TV, comics and prose, and is a BSFA award-winner for short fiction. His Shadow Police series are set in a slantwise version of our reality and book three in the series Who Killed Sherlock Holmes will be published in May. He has also written some of Doctor Who’s best-loved episodes for the BBC, and has more recently written for the Sherlock-inspired TV show Elementary, starring Jonny Lee Miller and Lucy Liu. He lives in Gloucestershire.

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England The Oxford Literary Festival Opens on Its 20th Year: April 02-10

England The 13th Althorp Literary Festival 2016: June 30-July 03

The British Academy Ariosto  the Orlando Furioso and English Culture Conference: 1516-2016: April 28-29

 April 28-29, 2016, Thursday-Friday
9.30am - 5.00pm
Venue: The British Academy
10-11 Carlton House Terrace
London SW1Y 5AH

 

Convenors: Professor Jane Everson, Royal Holloway University of London
Professor Andrew Hiscock, Bangor University
Dr Stefano Jossa, Royal Holloway University of London

April 2016 marks the fifth centenary of the publication of the first edition of Ariosto’s Orlando Furioso. Translated into English in the 1590s by Sir John Harington, godson of Elizabeth I, the influence of Ariosto’s poem can be traced in literature, music and the visual arts, from Spenser and Milton to modern media adaptations.

To celebrate this landmark centenary, and assess the impact of the poem on English culture over 500 years, a team of international scholars will discuss Ariosto’s poem through a consideration of editions and translations; critical reception; rewritings and adaptations in different media, in particular opera.

Speakers include:
Professor Albert Russell Ascoli, University of California, Berkeley
Professor Lina Bolzoni FBA, Scuola Normale di Pisa
Professor Helen Cooper FBA, University of Cambridge
Dr Luca Degl’Innocenti, University of Leeds
Dr Marco Dorigatti, University of Oxford
Professor Nicola Gardini, University of Oxford
Associate Professor Tobias Gregory, Catholic University of America, Washington
Professor Daniel Javitch, New York University
Professor Dilwyn Knox, University College London
Professor Dennis Looney, MLA/University of Pittsburgh
Dr Ita Mac Carthy, University of Birmingham
Professor Peter Mack FBA, University of Warwick
Dr Maureen McCue, Bangor University
Professor Martin McLaughlin, University of Oxford
Dr Susan Oliver, University of Essex
Associate Professor Eleonora Stoppino, University of Illinois
Professor Nigel Vincent FBA, The University of Manchester

If any student, post-doctoral or independent scholars would like to be considered for a bursary to attend this conference, please consult the following Webpage

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 Out of the Woods (Backyard of Eden)
Sam Jones, Eton College

1st Place Winner of Windsor Festival Youth Creative Schools Competition 2015

Carried from The Humanion Profile Celebration of Windsor Festival Youth Creative Schools Competition 2015
 

Adam stood up slowly, like a baby learning to walk for the first time, and craned his neck around to the left and then the right. There was a lonely sun hanging against the sky, which pained Adam’s eyes to stare at. The light become darker after moments and suddenly the surroundings that encompassed Adam become visible. Sturdy trees towered above Adam resembling in colour the same surface that wrapped around his bare feet. The living towers of trees that shaped the bower where he was could crush him if they fell, but Adam saw that they were just as still as the sun above.

Adam moved towards the trees clumsily, occasionally stepping on one foot with the other foot and the other foot with one foot, stumbling on rocks and thorns that prickled the path underfoot. His feet could withstand the blunt rocks but the cunning thorns pierced his skin and caused streaks of red to emanate from within his foot. When his eyes were released from their painful squinting, he raised them to acknowledge the depth of the forest. He failed to make out what was past the trees yet, but seemed certain that that was where he had to go.

Adam leaned on his shoulder against the rough skin of a tree. Alternating between trees every few steps, he balanced himself with the help of the structures. His senses were developing radically. A few moments after opening his eyes, he could feel the substance under his feet and see his surroundings. Now he could hear his breathing pattern when he swayed from one tree to another and a dull thud when his shoulders hammered onto the bark of the trees. Adam tried to find other sounds in the forest by using his neck to angle the side of his head.

Adam noticed that there were fewer trees to help him now as he came towards the edge of the forest. Instead a vast relief of earth dressed with grass took over from the forest. His feet were softened on the grass and the thorns became vaguely detectable. He was satisfied that he had progressed to the end of the forest. A warm glow held him in suspense as he held his ground between the forest and the exit. There was something strangely seductive in seeing the clearing. Past the edge of the woods lay a field. A naked and bare field just lay in front of him luring him closer. Closer to the centre of the field. Closer to another.

Eve lay on the earth, her back arched so that only her shoulders and lower body came into contact with the dirt. She made no effort to awaken or stand up, but instead embedded herself into the earth with her eyelids resolutely shut. Eve was situated in a meadow filled with grass and wild flowers. The plants were offering themselves to the animals of the meadow that encompassed Eve as food. As the feasting deer or hyena would bend their necks to the ground, the plants would swing towards their mouths, leaning in for a kiss before they were devoured. Eve could sense the presence of the animals surrounding her as she lay still. There was no reason for her to change her slumberous state.

Adam stared towards the centre of the field attempting to glimpse at what was attracting his whole body. His view seemed to be blocked by creatures of similar animation to himself in the field. The life that he saw in the creatures was remarkable compared to the trees. These living creatures would move in the same fashion as he did, by searching for a place to go and then go to that place; and they listened in the same fashion. The creatures would hold their heads high, bend their necks slightly to a certain direction and then wait. Majestically they waited.

Adam strode into the field that was covered with grass. Although he was near to the creatures, he refrained from touching them as he saw in them a sense of divinity. As if he was dirty and they clean. He pushed on towards the magnet that pulled him in. The creatures seemed to be more densely packed as he continued in the same direction. They not only crowded, but they leaned in around a patch of dirt. A sixth sense told him to push past the creatures, to show he had power over them. Eve knew something had changed around her. She could not remember feeling like this. The warmth on her eyelids from the sun became warmer and intrinsically deeper in her body.

Adam marched past the animals as they parted to give way, like a bride coming down the wedding aisle or a king to his coronation.
Eve tempted by the attraction, decided it was time. She kneeled upright and dared to open her eyes.
Adam and Eve.

*

Satan sat silently in a Tree surreptitiously staring out into the meadow at the couple. His legs dangled off the branch casually. When he had caught sight of the new man, he could not help but be fascinated by his clumsy gait. Like Satan, two legs supported his torso. Though they appeared sturdy, baby deer had better balance. This man had not been created a long time ago. Satan watched the man stumble into the field and past the animals that pitifully let him pass, moving to either side.

Satan did not feel pity for the man as the animals did. He saw no reason why he should. He himself never had trouble tromping around fields, especially not the meadows. A slick swittness came naturally to Satan’s body. As a child, he had been able to creep past any animal undetected, stuck to the shadows. Now he had mastered his secrecy: his ability to slink into the darkness and be lost in the light.

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